15 November 1600

Procedure: preamble

The parliament of the most excellent prince James VI, most illustrious king of Scots, held in Edinburgh on 15 November in the year of the Lord 1600, by our said supreme lord the king, himself being present, with all the estates of his realm, together with Francis [Hay], earl of Erroll, the constable, George [Keith], earl Marischal, and Daniel Graham, sheriff depute of Edinburgh, and David Lindsay, dempster.

  1. NAS, PA2/16, f.2r. Back
  2. NAS, PA2/16, f.3r-7r. Back
  3. 'Ditty' written in margin, in contemporary hand. Back
  4. APS interpolation. Back
  5. 'Parthie' in mss. Back
  6. A contemporary comment in the margin refers to the 'ditty' against Alexander Ruthven. Back
  7. APS interpolation. Back
  8. 'Colin' written in superscript above 'Patrick', the latter name having been crossed out. All modifications written in contemporary hand. Back
  9. NAS, PA2/16, f.7r-11v. Back
  10. This must be the battering ram referred to in the second Latin summons at 1600/11/8 above. Back
  11. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, apparently so called because it was designed to be worn concealed under the outer clothes. Back
  12. Defined in DSL as a sleeve consisting of or reinforced by plate-armour. Back
  13. Word unclear. Back
  14. The following last 9 lines of NAS, PA2/16, f.8v are difficult to read due to smudging. Back
  15. Defined in DSL as a kind of close-fitting metal defensive headpiece, a metal skull-cap, commonly worn under a bonnet or other fabric covering. Common in the 16th century. Back
  16. At the bottom of NAS, PA2/16, f.9v there is a dark mark on the left of the folio that obscures the contents. Back
  17. Sections of text in NAS, PA2/16, f.10r-v are obscured by blotting. Back
  18. Sic. 'Hay' in 1600/11/8 above. Back
  19. Some this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  20. Some of this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  21. The last 12 lines of NAS PA2/16, f.11r (the following two and a half paragraphs) are obscured by a large blot. Back
  22. 'Alexander' scored out in APS. Back
  23. NAS, PA2/16, f.11v-12r.
    Text of act obscured by large blots.
    Back
  24. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r. Some of text obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  25. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  26. APS interpolation. Back
  27. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r-v. Much of this act is obscured by a blot in the folio. Back
  28. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  29. NAS, PA2/16, f.12v-13v. Back
  30. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  31. Word unclear. Back
  32. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  33. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  34. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  35. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  36. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v-15r. Back
  37. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  38. NAS, PA2/16, f.15r-v. Back
  39. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  40. NAS, PA2/16, f.16r-v. Back
  41. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  42. Possibly Spoutwells, Tayside. Back
  43. Blank spaces denote 2 deleted words, which are illegible. Back
  44. NAS, PA2/16, f.16v-17v. Bottom right hand corner of f.17r. is torn off, and consequently the left hand side of f.17v. Back
  45. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  46. 'and that the' superscript in contemporary hand. Back
  47. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  48. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  49. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  50. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  51. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  52. NAS, PA2/16, f.17v-19r. Back
  53. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  54. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  55. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  56. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  57. Word unclear. Back
  58. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  59. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  60. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  61. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  62. This act is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/68. Back
  63. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Mss returns to usual hand. Back
  64. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  65. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  66. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  67. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  68. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  69. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v-20r. Back
  70. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  71. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r. Back
  72. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  73. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r-v. Back
  74. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  75. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  76. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  77. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  78. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  79. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  80. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  81. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  82. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  83. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  84. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  85. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  86. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  87. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  88. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  89. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  90. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  91. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  92. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  93. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r-v. Back
  94. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v. Back
  95. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  96. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v-22r. Back
  97. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  98. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r. Back
  99. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  100. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r-v. Back
  101. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  102. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v. Back
  103. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  104. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v-23r. Back
  105. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  106. Followed by a partly illegible deleted word, perhaps 'estate'? Back
  107. NAS, PA2/16, f.23r-v. Back
  108. 'P' printed in margin beside heading. Back
  109. NAS, PA2/16, f.23v-24r. Back
  110. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  111. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r. Back
  112. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  113. Uncertain meaning. Back
  114. Defined in DSL as 'The name of a water-fowl, wintering in Orkney and Shetland, and variously described as a variety of the teal, the pochard and the widgeon'. Back
  115. According to DSL, 'Origin and precise application obscure: the name of some (apparently aquatic) bird ... the guillemot or the razorbill, ? from the cries'. Back
  116. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r-v. Back
  117. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  118. NAS, PA2/16, f.24v-25r. Back
  119. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  120. NAS, PA2/16, f.25r-v. Back
  121. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  122. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  123. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  124. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  125. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  126. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, with or without sleeves, usually of leather lined or padded, and in the 16th century sometimes iron-plated or faced with mail. Back
  127. NAS, PA2/16, f.26r-27r. Back
  128. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  129. 'March' crossed out. Back
  130. NAS, PA2/16, f.27r-v. Back
  131. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  132. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v. Back
  133. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  134. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v-28r. Back
  135. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  136. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  137. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  138. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  139. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  140. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v. Back
  141. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  142. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v-29r. Back
  143. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  144. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  145. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  146. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  147. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  148. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  149. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  150. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r-v. Back
  151. 'V' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  152. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v. Back
  153. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  154. NAS, PA2/16, f.29v. Back
  155. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  156. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v-30r. Back
  157. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  158. NAS, PA2/16, f.30r-32r. Back
  159. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  160. The text of this act, not including the title heading, is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/22. Back
  161. NAS, PA2/16, f.32r-34v. Back
  162. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  163. 'portioner' scored out and replaced with 'feu farmer'. Back
  164. Inserted in superscript. Back
  165. Inserted in superscript. Back
  166. Followed by a deleted and illegible word. Back
  167. NAS, PA2/16, f.34v-35r. Back
  168. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  169. 'never' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  170. 'out' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  171. NAS, PA2/16, f.35v - blank folio page. Back
Judicial proceedings: summons of treason

The which day Master Thomas Hamilton of Drumcairnie, advocate to our sovereign lord, produced in presence of the king's majesty and whole estates of parliament, likewise he did diverse [times] of before, a summons of treason raised and pursued by our said sovereign lord and his highness's advocate and justice against William Ruthven, brother and apparent heir to the late John [Ruthven], earl of Gowrie and Master Alexander Ruthven, his brother, and his tutors and curators, if he has any, and all others having or pretending to have interest in the matter of treason underwritten, to have answered to the points of the said summons and to the crimes of treason and lese-majesty contained therein; and also the said advocate produced in presence of the king's majesty and estates summons raised by them against Alexander and Harry Ruthven, sons to the late Alexander Ruthven of Freeland, Patrick Eviott, brother to Colin Eviott of Balhousie, and Hugh Moncreiffe, brother to William Moncreiffe of that Ilk, to have likewise answered to the points of another summons of treason regarding the enterprising of the slaughter of our sovereign lord at Perth upon 5 August last; the which two summonses, reasons and causes therein contained, being first read in presence of the king's majesty and in presence of the lords of articles, they found both the same summonses relevant; and thereafter this instant day, both the said summonses of treason being read in presence of the king's majesty and whole estates and the said William Ruthven, his tutors and curators and all others having or pretending to have interest, the said Alexander and Harry Ruthven, Patrick Eviott and Hugh Moncreiffe being thrice called at the tolbooth window and none of them compearing, the said whole estates found both the said summonses, reasons and causes therein contained relevant and therefore they admitted the same to the said advocate's probation.

And immediately thereafter the said Master Thomas Hamilton of Drumcairnie, advocate to our sovereign, for proving of the points of both the said summonses of treason, produced the letter of horning duly executed and endorsed against the said Alexander and Harry Ruthven, Hugh Moncreiffe and Patrick Eviott, and that they were denounced rebels and put to the horn for the crimes of treason therein contained, and repeated the whole depositions of the witnesses examined before the lords of articles and the depositions of the late Master Thomas Cranston and George Craigengelt, and their execution to the death for the foresaid crime of treason; and lastly, the said advocate repeated the notoriety of the deed of the said treason, together with the whole circumstances of the said matter, and renounced further probation for proving of the points of both the said summonses of treason and desired the said process to be advised; and thereupon the said advocate asked instruments.

The which day the said Master Thomas Hamilton of Drumcairnie, advocate to our sovereign lord, after that he had repeated and produced all his probations to the said whole estates which he would use for proving of the points of the said summonses of treason raised and pursued at the instance of our said sovereign lord and his highness's justice against the said William Ruthven, brother and apparent heir to the said late John, earl of Gowrie and Alexander Ruthven, his brother, his tutors and curators and all others having or pretending to have interest in the matter of treason underwritten, whereby they were summoned to have compeared before our said sovereign lord and his estates of parliament at a certain day bygone, with continuation of days, to have answered to the points and crimes of treason and lese-majesty contained in the said summons; of the which summons the tenor follows:

James, by the grace of God, king of Scots, gives greetings to our beloved lyon king of arms, Marchmont, Islay, Ross, Rothesay, Albany and Snowdon, heralds, Robert Stewart, David Bryson, Alexander Douglas and James Chalmers, macers, Ormond, Bute, Unicorn and Carrick, pursuivants, and messengers, and whichever, jointly and severally, of our sheriffs specially constituted in that part. We mandate and instruct you to summon lawfully and peremptorily before witnesses William Ruthven, brother and heir apparent or successor of the late John, earl of Gowrie and the late Master Alexander Ruthven, his brother, in person if you are able conveniently to have his personal presence, otherwise at his dwelling places; if indeed he has been outwith our kingdom, that you summon the said William Ruthven and, all and singly, his tutors and curators, if he has any, for his interest, and also, all and singly, others who have or claim an interest, by public proclamation at the market crosses of our burghs of Edinburgh, Haddington, Perth and other necessary places, on notice of sixty days, in such a way that a summons of this kind could reasonably reach their ears and notice - that they should compear before us or our justice on 4 November next in our parliament held at Edinburgh on 1 November following, at the time of dealing with cases, with continuation of days, in order to answer to us or our justice in the foresaid parliament. For hearing and seeing, on the basis of the foregoing, it is decided and decreed, by us and by the decreet of the three estates of our realm, that the said late John, earl of Gowrie and the late Master Alexander Ruthven, his brother, have committed the crime of lese-majesty in their lifetimes, for the reason that, rejecting all fear of God and respect for king and reverence for the laws, and forgetful of our benevolence, who when they were condemned on account of their father's crimes and reduced by exile, infamy and poverty, were elevated by us to great wealth and position; nevertheless, displaying great hatred towards us, and repaying our incredible benevolence with unheard of ingratitude, in July past and at the beginning of August they plotted our betrayal, death and murder, and so that they might follow through their criminal and nefarious plans, the said late John, earl of Gowrie on 5 August this year sent his brother the late Master Alexander Ruthven to Falkland in the very early morning, in order to persuade us that he (unknown to the said earl, his brother) had discovered a huge amount of gold found by a discreet man, and had entrusted the treasure and its finder to custody secretly with all skill until he could declare everything to us as part of our jurisdiction, and hoped that we would be mindful of such a service to us and would load him with a share of the gold and every other favour, and that this would be expedient for the avoidance of suspicion, so that without any escort, and the accustomed crowd of domestics forbidden to follow, we should set out for Perth with him, so that having brought us into his power, as he intended, he might the more easily slay us; and acting the part allocated to him in this tragedy, the said late Master Alexander, with incredible cunning and confidence, with his very sweet address, expression and words responding obsequiously to our benevolence, respect and humble trust, easily persuaded us as he wished, and we, not suspecting that we were under any deception or danger, and accompanied by very few people (and those unarmed) hurried towards Perth, unprepared for the ambush he was leading us to. The earl meanwhile had been warned, first by Andrew Henderson and secondly by Andrew Ruthven (who had both been sent ahead by the said Master Alexander) that we were approaching - bereft of mercenary arms and everything else necessary for our defence - and eventually he was informed by Master Alexander himself, and, concealing his execrable and most crafty conspiracy, advanced to meet us outside the town, and treasonably led us within his walls and house which were identified for the detestable crime. There, he detained us for some time in a secluded bedroom until he could prepare everything necessary for the murder, on the pretence of a meal. With the said late Master Alexander, his brother, and the said Andrew Henderson, whom he had ordered to arm himself with a breastplate and helmet, he came in and ordered forcefully that he should carry out whatever the said Master Alexander ordered, and when he enquired out of curiosity what Andrew wished to order, the door was barred and he left him until they should return to perpetrate the crime. When things were thus arranged, the said late Master Alexander easily enticed us to the said bedroom, affirming that he would there carry out his grand promises, and so that indeed the earl could entirely snatch away all resource and hope of help from us, he spread through familiars of his a rumour that we had suddenly departed at the postern gate, with the said earl and Master Thomas Cranston, his servant, improperly asserting that it was true, to our most beloved kinsmen Ludovic [Stewart], earl of Lennox, John [Erskine], earl of Mar and a few others of our domestics who happened to be there. As a result, our earls, so deceived, spurred on their horses and burst out of the town to go to follow us to Falkland, to where the said earl was affirming that we had hastened. Meanwhile, the said late Master Alexander, barring many doors behind him, led us eventually to that room in which, as we said, he had placed the said Andrew Henderson, armed, to perpetrate the most dastardly crime. Then, thinking the time had come, he covered his head and rushed at us, following this through with hideous clamour and threatened us with immediate death by pressing a dagger to our throat. We resisted as best an unarmed person could, and tried to persuade him to desist from the foul, detestable and treasonable crime, undertaken without any just cause or hope of a good future, and that he should return to saner counsels, with the promise of pardon for the attempted treason if he should accept it. By small stages we repressed the rapid fury of the man to the extent that he replied that he would consult the earl about what he wanted to do with us. Leaving us prisoner in the said bedroom, barring the door behind him, and soon returning, he declared that we should die instantly, and our hands be bound, so that he might the more easily kill us, tied up. The said Andrew Henderson having been called to his assistance, when he noticed that we were ready to die rather than bear such shame, and resisting, he tried to draw his sword, preparing treasonably to kill us. We, relying on no arms and no companions but only on the spirit of almighty God, began a strong resistance, and holding his hands tightly, after a long struggle, against his will opened the bedroom window which looked on to the main square of Perth, and noticing our loyal kinsmen Ludovic, lord Lennox and John, earl of Mar who, by chance, were waiting for their horses so that they could follow us, we called them to our aid against the horrible treason and force brought to bear on our life. When they, concerned about our safety rather than their own and neglecting the risk, ran forward, could not reach the said bedroom, as so many doors had been barred by the said Master Alexander on purpose, by the wonderful mercy of God Almighty, our most loyal young servant John Ramsay climbed up by another approach and finding open another door by which the said Andrew Henderson had fled in terror, horrified by the crime which had been undertaken, went in, and seeing force being threatened against our life by the said late Master Alexander, exerted himself greatly and, having inflicted several wounds on the said Master Alexander, threw him out of the bedroom with our help. Now the said late John, earl of Gowrie, when he saw a few of our domestics who happened to be there preparing to bring help to us, abandoning all pretence, decided to perpetrate the planned crime on us by his own hand and bring about our death forthwith. Armed with two drawn swords, and accompanied by 100 or so associates, who had all furnished themselves with swords, lances and other arms, he burst from the road into the yard of his house and rushed to the bedroom in which he knew that we had been shut, and treasonably attacked the said John Ramsay, Lord Thomas Erskine [of Gogar] and Hugh Herries, a doctor, and all of proven loyalty towards us who by chance ran to our aid and were striving to offer their lives for our safety and keep the said earl from the approach to the said bedroom in which we then were. He fiercely repelled them, accompanied as he was by the said Master Thomas Cranston, Hugh Moncreiffe, Alexander and Henry Ruthven, Patrick Eviott and many other domestics and kinsmen of his, and entered by force the said bedroom in which our most noble and sacred person then was - our loyal servants, fighting with the greatest force, having been repulsed - and pursuing us most monstrously and treasonably almost overwhelmed our most loyal servants, who were wounded with many blows. He did not desist from the detestable, fierce and pertinacious execution of his treason until he fell, wounded by our said most loyal servants, before the monstrous breath of his body abandoned its home, as [the source of] the planning and execution of detestable, nefarious and horrendous treason. Hence the said late John, earl of Gowrie and the late Master Alexander Ruthven, his brother, committed the crime of lese-majesty against us and our royal authority and in open violation of all laws. Accordingly the said William Ruthven, brother and heir apparent and successor of the said late John, earl of Gowrie and the late Master Alexander, his brother, and all the tutors and curators of the said William, if he has any, for his interest, and all others who have an interest or claim - it is decided and declared by us and by the decreet of the three estates of our realm that the late John, earl of Gowrie and the late Master Alexander, his brother, have committed the forementioned crimes of lese-majesty in their lifetimes, for sight and hearing. Thus it is decreed that the name, memory and dignity of the said John, earl of Gowrie and of the late master Alexander Ruthven, his brother, are and shall be annulled, and that their arms and insignia are deleted from the book of arms and nobility and cancelled. Thus their descendants are unfit and unable henceforth in perpetuity to enjoy and possess, or in any way to claim honours, dignities, successions and possessions, and all their goods, both movable and immovable, rights, titles, expectation of succession and anything else in our kingdom, and also all their goods, lands, rents, offices, honours, dignities, successions and all expectation of succession and apparence, rights, titles, possessions and other rights and goods, movable and immovable, and everything else which related to the said John, earl of Gowrie and Master Alexander Ruthven, his brother, or could relate or pertain by any right, title, expectation of succession, possession or in any way, are confiscated and devolve to us, pertain to us and henceforth remain in our possession in perpetuity. It is intimated to the said William Ruthven, heir apparent or successor of the foresaid, his said tutors and curators, if he has any, and all others who have or claim an interest, whether they have compeared on the said day and in the said place, with continuation of days, or not, either we or our justice shall proceed in regard to the foregoing, in line with justice. Further, you are to cite Master John Moncrieff, advocate, Alexander Blair, younger, of Balthayock, George Hay of Netherton, prior of Charterhouse, Robert Graham of Thornick, John Graham of Balgowan, Andrew Hay, bailie of Perth, Alexander Peebles, burgess of the same, John Murray of Arbeny, William Robertson, notary in Perth, Gilbert Richardson of the same place, William Rhind, from the same, David Rhind, from the same, John Rintoul of the same, George Forrest of the same, Thomas Burrell of the same, Henry Leys of the same, and Robert Christie, janitor of the late earl of Gowrie, Ludovic, duke of Lennox, John, earl of Mar, Patrick [Leslie], commendator of Lindores, John Graham of Urquhill, Lord Thomas Erskine of Gogar, Lord John Ramsay, Lord Hugh Herries, Sir Robert Galbraith, Sir Robert Brown, Sir James Bogg, Sir James Liddell, Sir John Bogg in the ale cellar, and Master Peter Hay to compear before us or our justice on the said day and in the said place, with continuation of days, to demonstrate loyal testimony in the foresaid case, under pain of the law. Also, you shall hand over the said letter, duly executed and endorsed, to their bearer. Also you who have had writs served on you in person are to be on the said day in the said place, in the presence of ourselves or our judge, bearing with you written proof of your summons, or witnesses themselves. We give authority to you, and to whomsoever of you, our sheriffs in this regard, jointly and severally. Given under testimony of our great seal, at Edinburgh on 26 August in the year of the Lord 1600, and in the thirty-fourth year of our reign.

Follows the executions of the foresaid summons upon 28 August 1600: I, John Blindseil, Islay herald, one of the sheriffs in that part within constituted, passed at command of these our sovereign lord's letters and summons of treason to the dwelling house of Alexander Adamson in Edinburgh, in the late Master Thomas MacLean's close, where William Ruthven, brother and apparent heir or successor to the late John, earl of Gowrie, and the late Master Alexander Ruthven, his brother, made residence, and likewise to the castle of Dirleton, where the said William resorted and made sometime residence with Dame Dorothy Stewart, countess of Gowrie, his mother, because I could not apprehend him personally; and at every one of the said dwelling houses respectively, with my displayed coat of arms and sound of trumpet, after I had knocked six several knocks at every one of the said dwelling houses respectively, by virtue of the said letters in his highness's name and authority, I summoned, warned and charged the said William Ruthven, brother and apparent heir and successor foresaid, and his tutors and curators, if he had any, for their interest, to compear before our sovereign lord and his justice at Edinburgh upon 4 November next in the hour of cause, with continuation of days, in the parliament to be begun and held by our said sovereign lord and three estates of this realm at Edinburgh upon 1 November next, with continuation of days, to answer to our sovereign lord and his justice in the said parliament and to hear and see it be found, declared and discerned by decreet of our said sovereign lord and three estates of parliament that the said late John, earl of Gowrie and the late Master Alexander Ruthven, his brother, committed in their lifetimes the crimes of treason within libelled; and therefore, the said William Ruthven, brother and apparent heir and successor foresaid, and his tutors and curators, if he has any, for their interest, to hear and see it found and discerned by decreet of parliament the name, memory and dignity of the said late John, earl of Gowrie and the late Master Alexander Ruthven, his brother, to be abolished and extinguished and their arms deleted and cancelled out of the books of nobility and arms so that their posterity shall be secluded and declared unworthy and incapable of all offices, honours, dignities, successions, possessions, goods and gear moveable and immoveable, rights, titles, hope and appearance of succession and other rights whatsoever within this realm and altogether unable to hold, enjoy or possess the same or any of them in any time coming; and all their goods, lands, rents, offices, benefices, honours, dignities, successions and hope and appearance of successions, rights, titles, possessions and other rights, goods and gear moveable or immoveable and others whatsoever which belonged to the said late John, earl of Gowrie or the late Master Alexander Ruthven, his brother, or in any way might have pertained to them, to be escheat and confiscated to our said sovereign lord, devolved in his highness's person and to appertain to his highness and remain in property with him forever, with certification as is contained within, according to the tenor of the said summons in all points. Whereof I affixed an authentic copy at every one of the said dwelling places respectively after I had knocked six knocks thereat, as said is, before the witnesses William Ramsay, one of his majesty's trumpeters, Robert Elder, messenger in Edinburgh, Thomas Wallis and William Baxter, postmasters in Edinburgh, with diverse others; and for the more verification of the premise to this my execution, subscribed with my hand, my signet is affixed. It is thus written below, John Blindseil, Islay herald. Upon 28 August 1600, I, the said John Blindseil, Islay herald, one of the sheriffs in that part within constituted, passed at command of these our sovereign lord's letters to the market crosses of Edinburgh, Haddington and shore and pier of Leith respectively, head burghs of the shires where the said William Ruthven, brother and apparent heir and successor foresaid, made his residence; and likewise, upon 30 August and year of God foresaid, I, the said John Blindseil, passed at command foresaid to the market crosses of Perth, Scone and Kinross respectively, head burghs of the shires where the said late John, earl of Gowrie and the late Master Alexander Ruthven, his brother, made their residence in their lifetimes, and at every one of the said market crosses respectively, with displayed coat of arms and sound of trumpet, at command of the said letters, by open proclamation thereof, lawfully and peremptorily summoned, warned and charged the said William Ruthven, brother and apparent heir and successor to the said late John, earl of Gowrie and the late Master Alexander Ruthven, his brother, and the said William's tutors and curators, if he had any, and all others having or pretending to have interest in the action of treason and forfeiture underwritten, upon the premonition of 60 days' warning because the said William was suspected to be out of the country, to compear before our sovereign lord and his justice at Edinburgh upon 4 November next, in the hour of cause, with continuation of days, in the parliament to be begun and held by our said sovereign lord and three estates of his realm at Edinburgh upon 1 November next, with continuation of days, to answer to our said sovereign lord and his justice in the said parliament and to hear and see it found, declared and discerned by decreet of our said sovereign lord and three estates of parliament that the said late John, earl of Gowrie and the late Master Alexander Ruthven, his brother, committed in their lifetimes the crimes of treason libelled within; and therefore, the said William Ruthven, brother and apparent heir and successor foresaid, and his tutors and curators, if he has any, for their interest, to hear and see it be found and declared by decreet of parliament the name, memory and dignity of the said late John, earl of Gowrie and the late Master Alexander Ruthven, his brother, to be abolished and extinguished, and their arms to be deleted and cancelled out of the books of nobility and arms so that their posterity shall be secluded and declared unworthy and incapable of all offices, honours, dignities, successions, possessions, goods and gear moveable and immoveable, rights, titles, hope and appearance of succession and other rights whatsoever within this realm, and altogether unable to hold, enjoy or possess the same or any of them in any time coming and appearance of succession and other rights whatsoever and all their goods, lands, rents, offices, benefices, honours, dignities, successions and hope and appearance of succession, rights, titles and possessions and other rights and goods and gear moveable or immoveable, and others whatsoever which belonged to the said late John, earl of Gowrie or the late Master Alexander Ruthven, his brother, or in any way might have pertained to them, to be escheat and confiscated to our said sovereign lord, devolved in his highness's person and to pertain to his highness and remain with him in property forever, with certification as is within contained according to the tenor of the said letters in all points; whereof I affixed an authentic copy upon every one of the said market crosses, shore and pier of Leith respectively, before these witnesses respectively, William Ramsay, one of his majesty's trumpeters, William Forsyth and Robert Elder, messengers, Thomas Wallis and William Baxter, postmasters, witnesses to my executions at the market cross of Edinburgh, shore and pier of Leith and market cross of Haddington respectively; and the said William Ramsay, trumpeter, Robert Gray and John Elder, messengers, Thomas Wallis and David Young, postmasters in Edinburgh, witnesses to my executions in Perth, Scone and Kinross with diverse others. And for the more verification to this my execution, subscribed with my hand, my signet is affixed. It is thus written below, John Blindseil, with my hand.

The which summons, with the executions and endorsements thereof respectively foresaid, being this instant day read in presence of his majesty and whole estates of parliament, first in Latin and thereafter in Scots, and the said William Ruthven, his tutors and curators and all others having or pretending to have interest, being many times called of new at the tolbooth window of the said burgh of Edinburgh to have compeared and answered to the said summons and reasons contained therein, and he not compearing to have defended in the said matter and to have answered to the said summons, the said Master Thomas Hamilton of Drumcairnie, advocate to our sovereign lord, desired the said estates' declaration if the reason of the said summons was relevant against the said William Ruthven; which estates, all in one voice, found the same relevant against the said William. Therefore, the said advocate of new, for verifying of the said reason contained in the said summons of treason, produced and repeated the said letter of horning executed and registered against the said William Ruthven, the whole depositions of the witnesses examined before the lords of articles, with the depositions of the said late Master Thomas Cranston and George Craigengelt, their executions to the death for the same crimes, the notoriety of the said fact of treason and whole circumstances of the said matter, and also repeated the whole other probations repeated by him of before in the said matter this instant day and desired the said estates of parliament to advise the probations foresaid led and deduced in the said matter and to pronounce their sentence of parliament therein according to the same probations and their consciences. And thereafter the whole writs and probations being read, seen and considered by the whole estates of parliament in presence of the king's majesty and they therewith being ripely advised, the said lords and estates of parliament find, decree and declare that the said late John, earl of Gowrie and Master Alexander Ruthven, his bother, committed and did open and manifest treason against our said sovereign lord in all points, articles and manner contained in the said summons; and therefore it was given for doom by the mouth of David Lindsay, dempster of parliament, in manner and form as follows: This court of parliament shows for law that the said late John, earl of Gowrie and the late Master Alexander Ruthven, his brother, committed the foresaid crime of treason and lese-majesty in their lifetimes against our sovereign lord and his authorities royal in manner at length contained in the said summons, and therefore decrees and declares the name, memory and dignity of the said late John, earl of Gowrie and the late Master Alexander Ruthven, his brother, to be extinguished and their arms to be cancelled and deleted out of the books of arms and nobility so that their posterity shall be unable and incapable in all time coming to hold, possess or enjoy any offices, honours, dignities, successions, possessions and all goods moveable and immoveable, rights, titles, hope of succession and others whatsoever within this realm; and all goods, lands, rents, offices, benefices, honours, dignities, hope and appearance of succession, rights, titles, possessions and other goods and gear moveable and immoveable, and others whatsoever which in any way pertained to the said late John, earl of Gowrie and the late Master Alexander Ruthven, his brother, or which by any right, title, hope of succession, possession or any other manner of way might have belonged and pertained to them, to be confiscated, devolved in our sovereign lord and to appertain to his highness and in all time coming remain in property with his majesty forever. And further, his majesty and estates foresaid, in detestation of the said horrible, unnatural and vile treason attempted by the said late John, sometime earl of Gowrie and the late Master Alexander Ruthven against his highness's own life, decree, statute and ordain that the dead bodies of the said traitors shall be carried upon Monday next to the market cross of Edinburgh, and there to be hung, quartered and drawn in presence of the whole people, and thereafter the heads and quarters of their carcases to be affixed upon the most patent parts and places of the burghs of Edinburgh, Perth, Dundee and Stirling. And this I give for doom.

The which day the said Master Thomas Hamilton of Drumcairnie, advocate to our sovereign lord, after that he had repeated and produced all his probations to the said whole estates which he would use for proving of the foresaid summons of treason, raised and pursued at the instance of our said sovereign lord and his highness's justice against the said Alexander and Harry Ruthven, sons to the late Alexander Ruthven of Freeland, Patrick Eviott and Hugh Moncreiffe, whereby they were summoned to have compeared before our said sovereign lord and his estates of parliament at a certain day bygone, with continuation of days, to have answered to the points and crimes of treason and lese-majesty contained in the said summons, of the which summons the tenor follows:

James, by the grace of God, king of Scots, gives greetings to our beloved lyon king of arms, Islay, Albany, Ross, Rothesay, Snowdon and Marchmont, heralds, Robert Stewart, David Bryson, Alexander Douglas and James Chalmers, macers, Ormond, Bute, Unicorn and Carrick, pursuivants, and messengers, and whichever, jointly and severally, of our sheriffs specially constituted in that part. We mandate and instruct you to summon lawfully and peremptorily before witnesses Alexander Ruthven and Henry Ruthven, legitimate sons of the late Alexander Ruthven of Freeland, Hugh Moncreiffe, brother of William Moncreiffe of that Ilk, Patrick Eviott, brother of Colin Eviott of Balhousie, as conspirators, perpetrators and concealers of the following crimes of lese-majesty, in person if you are able conveniently to have their personal presence, otherwise at their dwelling places and by public proclamation at the market crosses of our burghs of Edinburgh, Perth, Haddington and other necessary places if they stay or live outwith our realm or have no fixed abode, at the said market crosses and other necessary places on notice of sixty days, in such a way that a summons of this kind could reasonably reach their ears and notice - that they should compear before us or our justice on 4 November next in our parliament to be held at Edinburgh on 1 November following, at the time of dealing with cases, with continuation of days, in order to answer to us or our justice in the foresaid parliament, regarding the following treasonable crimes, that is to say the said persons and any of them for their treasonable art and part, plotting and aid, and their nefarious and execrable conspiracy, plotting and perpetration of the most horrendous and savage treason carried out against our most noble and sacred person and life, by the said persons and the late John, earl of Gowrie, the late Master Alexander Ruthven, his brother, the late Master Thomas Cranston and George Craigengelt, his servants, and their other accomplices in their name, and by his causation, instruction, assistance and advice, on 5 August this year, committed and perpetrated in the following fashion. For when the said late John, earl of Gowrie and the said late Master Alexander Ruthven, his brother, loaded with innumerable benefits out of our outstanding benevolence conspired, with unheard of and incredible ingratitude, with a view to our death, and the said earl had sent his late brother to Falkland to us on 5 August, so that having raised the expectation of outstanding advantage he could entice us to Perth, having acquired as travelling companions Andrew Henderson and Andrew Ruthven, who, on Alexander's orders, were to warn him most swiftly regarding our response to him, and the said late Master Alexander acted out so cunningly and in such an underhand way the part in the tragedy which he had undertaken, so that he drew us, free of any feeling of suspicion, easily to his opinion and, our accustomed band of companions having been prevented from following, brought us with him to Perth, having in the meantime sent ahead the said Andrew Henderson to warn of our approach. The earl, having ordered the said Andrew to arm himself with breastplate, helmet and sword, awaited the arrival of Andrew Ruthven, and having been informed by him that we were approaching, gave no sign by his expression or his words that he knew anything such, began to provide for us in the accustomed fashion. Eventually having been warned by Master Alexander Ruthven himself that we were at the town gate, he came out to meet us and, leading us into his house - identified for a treasonable deed - detained us a while on the pretext of a meal, until he called the said Andrew Henderson with his said late brother to the secluded bedroom, and there ordered the said Andrew to carry out seduluously whatever the said Master Alexander should order him, and suddenly returning to us invited the few of our familiars who had followed us to a meal, then when it was finished to the garden some distance away from that part of the building, with the intention that with no witnesses the said late Master Alexander who, pretending that he was willing to provide what he had promised had attracted us to the said bedroom, by knowing the name of our familiars, would be able the more safely, without any noise and with no impediment, end our life; and when the said earl, so that he might deprive us of any hope of help, spread a false rumour by the late Master Robert Cranston, his servant, regarding our sudden departure, our familiars, influenced by the earl affirming on his oath that it was true, and believing it, rushed headlong into the road so that they could follow us at top speed on horseback. In the meantime the said Master Alexander, thinking that everything had succeeded as he wished and that the time had come for perpetrating the deed, bolting many doors behind him, and leading us to the seclusion of the said bedroom, and the said Andrew Henderson, who was armed, approached, the said Master Alexander fiercely and treasonably rushed at us, and slashing with most foul and false cries, put a dagger to our throat and threatened us with imminent death. We, deprived of any companions, arms and all other human aid, and relying only on the help of the divine power, restrained - with most serious words and, if he were to desist and return to saner counsels, the promise of immunity for his treason - the fury of that most evil man, to the extent that when he said he would consult his brother as to what they should decide regarding us, and having previously extorted an oath from us that we would remain prisoner and silent until his return in the said room, he left, bolting behind him the door and closing us in, and after a very short delay returned, and declared that we had to die instantly, and when he strove treasonably to bind our hands so that might finish us off with less trouble when tied up, and we strenuously resisted, he began to draw his sword with his right hand, and with his left prevented us from speaking and obstructed our throat; we, however, strengthened by the help of Almighty God and struggling forcefully, against his will reached a window which looked on to the main square of the town, and noticing there our beloved kinsmen Ludovic, earl of Lennox and John, earl of Mar, who by chance were there, waiting for horses so that they could follow us, we called them to bring us help against the horrendous treason and imminent death. Struck by the enormity of this unexpected treason, when they heard that help needed to be brought to us to enable us to get down very quickly, so many doors having been deliberately closed by the late Master Alexander in vain, they ran forward, and undoubtedly led by the spirit of God our young familiar John Ramsay climbed in another way and entered by another door of the said bedroom which the said Andrew Henderson, astonished by the horrid nature of the crime, had recently opened in order to make his escape from there, and noticing the said late Master Alexander bearing down on us determinedly he inflicted several wounds on him with our help, and nearly drove him out of the room, when the said earl, seeing that the conspiracy had been detected by our shout, and what his brother was not able to do he rushed to complete by his own hand and by his desperate and treasonable intention. Drawing the swords he carried, he rushed from the road into the yard of his house accompanied by 100 or so armed accomplices and, in the presence of the late Master Robert Cranston, the said late earl and the said Alexander and Henry Ruthven, Hugh Moncreiffe, Patrick Eviott and other accomplices of theirs, burst straight into the bedroom in which they knew we had formerly been shut in. With no time to draw breath or for our domestics to look after anyone, they most savagely attacked the said John Ramsay, Lord Thomas Erskine and Hugh Herries, a doctor, who by chance were the only ones of our people who ran up and tried to keep the said traitors from the approach to the bedroom, and when they had been driven back with extreme force they forcibly entered the bedroom most rapaciously seeking to kill our said most loyal servants who were fighting most bravely for our safety, and almost overwhelmed them by inflicting many wounds, until when the said earl had been stabbed and the said late Master Thomas Cranston, Hugh Moncreiffe and Patrick Eviott had been wounded several times and had been driven from the bedroom, they were forced to flee to the yard. There, gathering a huge crowd of all desperate men, they blocked all the approaches to the building, and posting guards on all sides treasonably surrounded us in a siege, and brought a battering ram to smash the doors, and bringing gunpowder they asked how they could rip from its foundations, lift into the air and destroy the building we were besieged in, and treasonably kill us, our said kinsmen and other loyal subjects besieged with us by overwhelming us with fire and ruin. They threatened the cross, nooses and all most foul modes of death to all of those who were defending the building with us, and with our wounded persevered during the siege with their treasonable plan almost to death, until as the gathering of our loyal subjects to us increased, with everyone running to our aid, against their foul expectation, the conspirators were gradually forced to surrender. Thus, the said persons and any of them have committed the crime of lese-majesty against us, our royal authority and laws. Accordingly it is decided and declared by us and by the decreet of the three estates of our realm that as conspirators, traitors, executors of treason and concealers of the foresaid crimes, the said Alexander Ruthven, Henry Ruthven, his brother, Hugh Moncreiffe and Patrick Eviott and any of them respectively have committed the forementioned crimes of lese-majesty, for sight and hearing. Also for the forementioned and very many other rebellions, transgressions and treasonable crimes impiously and nefariously perpetrated by them respectively against us, our realm and our royal authority, they should present and show themselves on the said day in the said place, with continuation of days, in obedience to the law. Further, they should await and subject themselves to our justice and that of our parliament in this regard, following the laws of our realm. The said persons, conspirators, traitors and concealers of the preceding crimes respectively, and any of them, for hearing and seeing, on the basis of the foregoing, it is decided and decreed, by us and by the decreet of the three estates of our realm, that they have incurred the charge of lese-majesty. For that reason, their persons undergo the penalty of treason and the ultimate punishment prescribed by the laws of our realm, and all their goods, movable and immovable, both lands, offices and benefices, and other things relating to them or in any way capable of pertaining to them, are confiscated by us in perpetuity, and remain with us as property. Also, their descendants are unfit and unable henceforth in perpetuity to obtain and possess honours, dignities, offices, benefices, successions and all their goods, both movable and immovable in our kingdom. Further, it is intimated to the foresaid conspirators and to whomsoever of them that they must answer these charges and obey the law, whether they have compeared on the said day and in the said place, with continuation of days, or not, either we or our justice shall proceed in regard to the foregoing, in line with justice. Further, you are to cite Master John Moncrieff, advocate, Alexander Blair, younger, of Balthayock, George Hay of Netherton, Master Peter Hay, Robert Graham of Thornick, John Graham of Balgowan, John Murray of Arbanie, Andrew Hay, bailie of Perth, Alexander Peebles, William Robertson, Gilbert Richardson,William Rhind, David Rhind, John Rintoul, George Forrest, Thomas Burrell, Henry Leys of the same, and Robert Christie, janitor of the said late earl, Ludovic, duke of Lennox, John, earl of Mar, Patrick, commendator of Lindores, John Graham of Urquhill, Lord Thomas Erskine, Lord John Ramsay, Lord Hugh Herries, Sir Robert Galbraith, Sir Robert Brown, Sir James Bogg, Sir James Liddell, Sir John Bogg in the ale cellar, and Master Peter Hay, to compear before us or our justice on the said day and in the said place, with continuation of days, to demonstrate loyal testimony in the foresaid case, under pain of the law. Also, you shall hand over the said letter, duly executed and endorsed, to their bearer. Also you who have served writs in person are to be on the said day in the said place, in the presence of ourselves or our judge, bearing with you written proof of your summons in respect of the foregoing, or witnesses themselves. We give authority to you, and to whomsoever of you, our sheriffs in this regard, jointly and severally. Given under testimony of our great seal, at Edinburgh on 26 August in the year of the Lord 1600, and in the thirty-fourth year of our reign.

Follows the executions of the foresaid summons upon 28 August 1600: I, John Blindseil, Islay herald, one of the sheriffs in that part within constituted, passed at command of these our sovereign lord's letters and summons of treason to the market crosses of Edinburgh, Haddington and shore and pier of Leith respectively; and upon 30 August I passed to the market crosses of the burghs of Perth, Scone and Kinross, head burghs of the shire where Alexander and Harry Ruthven, sons to the late Alexander Ruthven of Freeland, Hugh Moncreiffe, brother to William Moncreiffe of that Ilk, and Patrick Eviott, brother [to Colin] Eviott of Balhousie, sometimes made their residence; and there, with sound of trumpet and displayed coat of arms, and by proclaiming of these our sovereign lord's letters at every one of the said market crosses and shore and pier of Leith respectively, with displayed coat of arms and sound of trumpet as said is, I lawfully and peremptorily summoned, warned and charged the said Alexander and Harry Ruthven, Hugh Moncreiffe and Patrick Eviott upon 60 days' warning because some of them were suspected to be out of the country, to compear before our sovereign lord and his justice at Edinburgh upon 4 November next in the hour of cause, with continuation of days, in the parliament to be held and begun by his majesty and estates of this realm at Edinburgh, 1 November next, to answer at the instance of our said sovereign lord and his justice in the said parliament and to hear and see it be found and declared by decreet and sentence of our said sovereign lord and his estates foresaid that the said persons and every one of them have committed the crimes of treason and lese-majesty within mentioned and are art and part thereof; and therefore they, and every one of them, to be discerned by decreet foresaid to have incurred the pains of treason in their bodies, lands, possessions, goods and gear, memory and posterity, with certification as is within contained, according to the tenor of the said letters in all points; whereof I affixed authentic copies upon every one of the said market crosses and shore and pier of Leith respectively before these witnesses, William Ramsay, one of his majesty's trumpeters, William Forsyth, Robert Elder and John Gray, messengers, Thomas Wallis and William Baxter and David Young, postmasters in Edinburgh, with diverse others; and for the better verification of the premises to this my executions and endorsement, subscribed with my hand, my signet is affixed. It is thus written below, John Blindseil, Islay herald. Upon 30 August 1600, I, John Blindseil, Islay herald, one of the sheriffs in that part within constituted, passed at command of these our sovereign lord's letters to the dwelling house of the late John, earl of Gowrie in Perth, and to the dwelling house and chambers respectively of the said Alexander and Harry Ruthven, Hugh Moncreiffe and Patrick Eviott within the said burgh of Perth, and there at the said late Earl of Gowrie, their master's dwelling house, with whom they, and every one of them, being his servants, made their ordinary residence, and likewise every one of their said dwelling houses and chambers in Perth; with sound of trumpet and displayed coat of arms, I lawfully and peremptorily summoned, warned and charged the said Alexander and Harry Ruthven, Hugh Moncreiffe and Patrick Eviott at these said dwelling houses, after I had knocked six several knocks at the principal gate and door of every one of them respectively, to compear before our sovereign lord and his justice at Edinburgh upon 4 November next, in the hour of cause, with continuation of days, in the parliament to be held and begun by his majesty and estates of this realm at Edinburgh upon 1 November next, to answer at the instance of our said sovereign lord and his justice in the said parliament, and to hear and see it be found and declared by decreet and sentence of our said sovereign lord and his estates foresaid that the said persons and every one of them have committed the crimes of treason and lese-majesty within mentioned and are art and part thereof; and therefore, they, and every one of them, to be declared to have incurred the pains of treason in their bodies, lands, possessions, goods, gear, memory and posterity, with certification as is within mentioned according to the tenor of the said letters in all points; whereof I affixed an authentic copy upon every one of the said dwelling places respectively where every one of the said persons remained and for every one of them before these witnesses, William Ramsay, one of his majesty's trumpeters, John Gray and Robert Elder, messenger, Thomas Wallis and David Young, postmasters in Edinburgh, with diverse others; and for the more verification of the premises to this my execution, subscribed with my hand, my signet is affixed. It is thus written below, John Blindseil, Islay herald.

The which summons, with the executions and endorsements thereof respectively foresaid, being this instant day read in presence of his majesty and whole estates of parliament, first in Latin and thereafter in Scots, and the said Alexander and Harry Ruthven, Hugh Moncreiffe and Patrick Eviott being many times called of new at the tolbooth window of the said burgh of Edinburgh to have compeared and answered to the said summons and reason contained therein, and they nor any of them compearing to have defended in the said matter and to have answered to the said summons, the said Master Thomas Hamilton of Drumcairnie, advocate to our sovereign lord, desired the said estates' declaration if the reason of the said summons was relevant against the said Alexander and Harry Ruthven, Hugh Moncreiffe and Patrick Eviott and every one of them; which estates, all in one voice, found the same relevant against the said Alexander and Harry Ruthven, Hugh Moncreiffe and Patrick Eviott and each one of them. Therefore the said advocate of new, for verifying of the said reason contained in the said summons of treason, produced and repeated the said letters of horning executed and registered against the said Alexander and Harry Ruthven, Hugh Moncreiffe and Patrick Eviott, the whole depositions of the witnesses examined before the lords of articles, with the depositions of the said late Master Thomas Cranston and George Craigengelt, their execution to the death for the same crimes, the notoriety of the said fact of treason and whole circumstances of the said matter and also repeated the whole other probations repeated by him of before in the said matter this instant day, and desired the said estates of parliament to advise the probations foresaid led and deduced in the said matter and to pronounce their sentence of parliament therein according to the same probations and their consciences. And thereafter the whole writs and probations being read, seen and considered by the whole estates of parliament in presence of the king's majesty, and they therewith being ripely advised, the said lords and estates of parliament find, decree and declare that the said Alexander and Harry Ruthven, Hugh Moncreiffe and Patrick Eviott, and each one of them, committed and did open and manifest treason against our said sovereign lord in all points, articles and manner contained in the said summons; and therefore it was given for doom by the mouth of David Lindsay, dempster of parliament, in manner and form as follows: This court of parliament shows for law that the said Alexander Ruthven, Harry Ruthven, his brother, sons lawful to the late Alexander Ruthven of Freeland, Hugh Moncreiffe, brother to William Moncreiffe of that Ilk, and Patrick Eviott, brother to ColinEviott of Balhousie, committed the crimes of treason and lese-majesty against our sovereign lord and his authority royal in manner at length contained in the said summons; and therefore decrees and declares their persons to underlie the pains of treason and lese-majesty and last punishment prescribed by the laws of this realm and all their goods moveable and immoveable, as well heritages as offices, benefices and others whatsoever pertaining to them, or which might in any way belong or appertain to them, to be confiscated to his majesty and to remain with his highness in property forever and their posterity to be now and in all time coming incapable and unable to hold and possess within this realm any honours, dignities, offices, benefices, successions or other goods or gear, moveable or immoveable. And this I give for doom.

  1. NAS, PA2/16, f.2r. Back
  2. NAS, PA2/16, f.3r-7r. Back
  3. 'Ditty' written in margin, in contemporary hand. Back
  4. APS interpolation. Back
  5. 'Parthie' in mss. Back
  6. A contemporary comment in the margin refers to the 'ditty' against Alexander Ruthven. Back
  7. APS interpolation. Back
  8. 'Colin' written in superscript above 'Patrick', the latter name having been crossed out. All modifications written in contemporary hand. Back
  9. NAS, PA2/16, f.7r-11v. Back
  10. This must be the battering ram referred to in the second Latin summons at 1600/11/8 above. Back
  11. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, apparently so called because it was designed to be worn concealed under the outer clothes. Back
  12. Defined in DSL as a sleeve consisting of or reinforced by plate-armour. Back
  13. Word unclear. Back
  14. The following last 9 lines of NAS, PA2/16, f.8v are difficult to read due to smudging. Back
  15. Defined in DSL as a kind of close-fitting metal defensive headpiece, a metal skull-cap, commonly worn under a bonnet or other fabric covering. Common in the 16th century. Back
  16. At the bottom of NAS, PA2/16, f.9v there is a dark mark on the left of the folio that obscures the contents. Back
  17. Sections of text in NAS, PA2/16, f.10r-v are obscured by blotting. Back
  18. Sic. 'Hay' in 1600/11/8 above. Back
  19. Some this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  20. Some of this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  21. The last 12 lines of NAS PA2/16, f.11r (the following two and a half paragraphs) are obscured by a large blot. Back
  22. 'Alexander' scored out in APS. Back
  23. NAS, PA2/16, f.11v-12r.
    Text of act obscured by large blots.
    Back
  24. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r. Some of text obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  25. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  26. APS interpolation. Back
  27. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r-v. Much of this act is obscured by a blot in the folio. Back
  28. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  29. NAS, PA2/16, f.12v-13v. Back
  30. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  31. Word unclear. Back
  32. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  33. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  34. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  35. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  36. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v-15r. Back
  37. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  38. NAS, PA2/16, f.15r-v. Back
  39. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  40. NAS, PA2/16, f.16r-v. Back
  41. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  42. Possibly Spoutwells, Tayside. Back
  43. Blank spaces denote 2 deleted words, which are illegible. Back
  44. NAS, PA2/16, f.16v-17v. Bottom right hand corner of f.17r. is torn off, and consequently the left hand side of f.17v. Back
  45. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  46. 'and that the' superscript in contemporary hand. Back
  47. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  48. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  49. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  50. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  51. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  52. NAS, PA2/16, f.17v-19r. Back
  53. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  54. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  55. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  56. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  57. Word unclear. Back
  58. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  59. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  60. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  61. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  62. This act is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/68. Back
  63. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Mss returns to usual hand. Back
  64. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  65. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  66. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  67. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  68. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  69. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v-20r. Back
  70. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  71. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r. Back
  72. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  73. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r-v. Back
  74. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  75. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  76. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  77. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  78. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  79. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  80. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  81. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  82. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  83. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  84. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  85. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  86. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  87. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  88. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  89. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  90. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  91. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  92. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  93. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r-v. Back
  94. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v. Back
  95. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  96. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v-22r. Back
  97. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  98. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r. Back
  99. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  100. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r-v. Back
  101. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  102. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v. Back
  103. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  104. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v-23r. Back
  105. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  106. Followed by a partly illegible deleted word, perhaps 'estate'? Back
  107. NAS, PA2/16, f.23r-v. Back
  108. 'P' printed in margin beside heading. Back
  109. NAS, PA2/16, f.23v-24r. Back
  110. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  111. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r. Back
  112. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  113. Uncertain meaning. Back
  114. Defined in DSL as 'The name of a water-fowl, wintering in Orkney and Shetland, and variously described as a variety of the teal, the pochard and the widgeon'. Back
  115. According to DSL, 'Origin and precise application obscure: the name of some (apparently aquatic) bird ... the guillemot or the razorbill, ? from the cries'. Back
  116. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r-v. Back
  117. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  118. NAS, PA2/16, f.24v-25r. Back
  119. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  120. NAS, PA2/16, f.25r-v. Back
  121. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  122. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  123. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  124. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  125. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  126. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, with or without sleeves, usually of leather lined or padded, and in the 16th century sometimes iron-plated or faced with mail. Back
  127. NAS, PA2/16, f.26r-27r. Back
  128. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  129. 'March' crossed out. Back
  130. NAS, PA2/16, f.27r-v. Back
  131. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  132. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v. Back
  133. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  134. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v-28r. Back
  135. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  136. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  137. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  138. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  139. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  140. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v. Back
  141. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  142. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v-29r. Back
  143. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  144. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  145. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  146. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  147. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  148. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  149. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  150. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r-v. Back
  151. 'V' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  152. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v. Back
  153. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  154. NAS, PA2/16, f.29v. Back
  155. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  156. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v-30r. Back
  157. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  158. NAS, PA2/16, f.30r-32r. Back
  159. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  160. The text of this act, not including the title heading, is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/22. Back
  161. NAS, PA2/16, f.32r-34v. Back
  162. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  163. 'portioner' scored out and replaced with 'feu farmer'. Back
  164. Inserted in superscript. Back
  165. Inserted in superscript. Back
  166. Followed by a deleted and illegible word. Back
  167. NAS, PA2/16, f.34v-35r. Back
  168. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  169. 'never' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  170. 'out' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  171. NAS, PA2/16, f.35v - blank folio page. Back
Judicial proceedings: witness depositions

Follows the depositions of the witnesses examined in presence of the lords of articles for proving of the said two summonses of treason:

[Ludovic Stewart], duke of Lennox, sworn and examined, testifies that upon 5 August last, this witness, for the time being in Falkland in company with his majesty, he saw Master Alexander Ruthven speaking with his grace beside the stables between 6 o'clock and 7 o'clock in the morning; and shortly thereafter his majesty, passing to the hunting of the buck and having slain one in the park of Falkland, his highness spoke to the witness desiring him to accompany his majesty to Perth to speak with [John Ruthven], earl of Gowrie; and immediately thereafter this witness sent his servant for another horse and for a sword and mounted on horse-back and followed his grace; and as this witness overtook his grace, Master Alexander Ruthven was speaking with his majesty and shortly after the witness's coming to the king his highness rode apart and spoke with this witness saying, 'You cannot guess what errand I am riding for; I am going to get a hoard in Perth and Master Alexander Ruthven has informed me that he has found a man that has a pitcher full of coined gold of great sorts'. And in the meantime his highness enquired at this witness of what humour he thought Master Alexander Ruthven to be of, who answered that he knew nothing of him but an honest discreet gentleman. And after that his highness had declared to this witness the whole circumstances of the man who had the said gold, the place where it was found, where it was kept, this witness answered, 'I like not that (sir) for that is not likely'. And they riding beside the bridge of Earn, his majesty told to this witness that Master Alexander desired him to keep that matter of the hoard close secret and to take nobody with him. And than his highness, both at that time and thereafter in Perth, within the Earl of Gowrie's hall, said to this witness, 'Pay attention when I pass with Master Alexander Ruthven and follow me'. And as his majesty was within a mile to Perth, after that Master Alexander had come a certain space with his highness, he rode away and galloped to Perth before the rest of the company towards his brother's lodging, of purpose, as the witness believes, to advertise the Earl of Gowrie of his majesty's coming there. And, as his majesty was within two pair of boot lengths to the town of Perth, the Earl of Gowrie, accompanied with diverse persons, all on foot, met his highness in the Inch and saluted him, and immediately thereafter his majesty, accompanied with this witness, [John Erskine], earl of Mar, [Patrick Leslie of Pitcairlie, commendator of] Lindores, [James Drummond, commendator of] Inchaffray, Sir Thomas Erskine [of Gogar], [John Graham], laird of Urquhill, James Erskine, William Stewart, Sir Hugh Herries, Sir John Ramsay, John Murray, John Hamilton of the Grange and John Graham of Balgowan, passed altogether in the Earl of Gowrie's hall, the said Earl of Gowrie and Master Alexander Ruthven being both present with them, and after their entry his majesty cried for a drink, which was long of coming and it was an hour next after his first coming before his majesty got his dinner. And the time that his majesty got his dessert the Earl of Gowrie came to this witness and to the Earl of Mar and remaining persons foresaid, and desired them to dine, which they did in the hall; and when they had almost dined, the Earl of Gowrie came from his majesty's chamber to the hall and called for wine and said that he was directed from his majesty's chamber to drink his toast to my lord duke and rest of the company, which he did. And immediately after the toasting cup had passed about this witness rose from table to have awaited upon his majesty, according to his former direction, and then the Earl of Gowrie said to this witness that his majesty was gone up quietly on some quiet errand. And next the said Earl of Gowrie cried for the key of his yard and passed in company with this witness to the yard, accompanied with Lindores and Sir Hugh Herries and certain others, and shortly after their being in the yard Master Thomas Cranston came down to the yard crying the king's majesty is mounted on horse-back, and riding through the Inch. And then the Earl of Gowrie cried 'Horse, horse', and the said Master Thomas Cranston answered to him 'Your horse is in Scone', which the Earl of Gowrie pretended not to hear but cried 'Yes, horse, horse'. And the witness and the Earl of Gowrie came out of the yard through the hall to the close and came to the outer gate and this witness enquired at the porter if the king was forth, who answered that he was assured that his majesty was not out of the place. Then the Earl of Gowrie said, 'I am sure he is forth; always stay my lord duke and I shall go up and get your lordship the verity and certainty thereof'. And the said Earl of Gowrie passed up and immediately came down again to the close and he affirmed to this witness that the king's majesty was forth at the back gate and away, whereupon this witness, the Earl of Gowrie and Mar and whole company passed forth at the fore-gate of the lodging and stood before the same gate upon the high-gate, and as they were standing there advising where to seek the king, at once and in this meantime this witness heard a voice and said to the Earl of Mar, 'This is the king's voice that cries! Be where he will?' and so they all looked up to the lodging. They saw his majesty looking out of the window missing his hat, his face being red and a hand gripping his cheek and mouth, and the king cried, 'I am murdered, treason, my lord Mar, help, help!' And immediately this witness, the Earl of Mar and their company ran up the stair to the gallery chamber where his majesty was to have relieved him, and as they passed up they found the door of the chamber fast, and seeing a ladder standing beside they bashed at the door with the ladder and the rungs of the ladder broke, and next they sent for hammers and notwithstanding long forcing with hammers they got not entry at the said chamber until after the Earl of Gowrie and his brother were both slain. That Robbie Brown passed about by the back door and came to his majesty and assured his highness that it was my lord duke and the Earl of Mar that were breaking down the chamber door and then the hammer was given through the hole of the door of the chamber and they within broke the doors and gave them entry. And at their first entry they saw the Earl of Gowrie lying dead in the chamber, Master Alexander Ruthven being slain and taken down the stair before their entry. And at their first entry within the said chamber where the king's majesty was, the witness saw sundry halberts and swords striking under the door of the chamber and sides thereof by reason the same was no close door, and knew none of the strikers except Alexander Ruthven, one of the defenders, who desired to speak with this witness through the door and enquired at him, 'For God's sake, my lord, tell me how my lord Gowrie does'. To whom this witness answered, 'He is well', and the said witness bade the said Alexander to go his way and that he was a fool and that he would get little thanks for that labour. And in this meantime, as they were continuing in striking with halberts under the door, big John Murray, servant to Tullibardine, was struck through the leg, and as soon as the said Alexander Ruthven had heard the said lord duke speak, he and his whole accomplices passed from the foresaid door and made no more troubling thereafter thereat and passed down to the close and stood there. And saw none of the remaining defenders present at the doing of the violent turns that day except by report but the said Alexander Ruthven, but says that he saw Hugh Moncreiffe, Harry and Alexander Ruthven and Patrick Eviott with the Earl of Gowrie at the king's dinner that day and of before, and thereafter looking over the chamber window he saw George Craigengelt and Alexander Ruthven and diverse others of the Earl of Gowrie's servants whom this witness knew not standing in arms within the close, and also saw other persons carrying a timber beam from the town to the close of the Earl of Gowrie's lodging, and declares that there abode sundry persons within the said close and in the high street before the said earl's lodging crying and making tumult for the space of two hours and more next after the death of the said Earl of Gowrie and his brother. It is thus written below, Lennox.

[John Erskine], earl of Mar, sworn and examined, testifies according to [Ludovic Stewart], lord duke of Lennox's deposition in all things substantial, except his lordship saw not Master Alexander Ruthven in Falkland until about 10 o'clock the day libelled, shortly before the slaying of buck, and also overtook not his majesty that day until his majesty was near the bridge of Earn, and that after their dinner my lord Mar passed not to the yard in company with [John Ruthven], earl of Gowrie but passed to chamber where the king dined and saw nothing of the timber beam.

Andrew Henderson, chamberlain of Scone, sworn, testifies that he is of the age of 38 years, declares that upon Monday at night, 4 August last, this witness being after supper in company with [John Ruthven], earl of Gowrie and Master Alexander Ruthven within my lord's own chamber, the Earl of Gowrie enquired at this witness what he had to do tomorrow, to whom this witness answered that he had to ride to Ruthven to speak with the tenants. Then the Earl of Gowrie answered, 'Delay that journey. You must ride to Falkland in company with my brother, Master Alexander, and take Andrew Ruthven with you, and that you be ready to ride by 4 o'clock in the morning and haste you back with answer as my brother directs you, by writing or otherwise, and let Andrew Ruthven remain with my brother'. And the morning after, 4 o'clock in the morning, they rode all three together to Falkland, and coming to Falkland they dismounted at John Balfour's house, and seeing that Colonel Edmond was there they lodged in one Law's house and the master sent this witness about 7 o'clock in the morning to see what the king's majesty was doing. And as he was within the palace he saw the king's majesty coming forth the mid-close, booted, and then he returned back again to the master and said to him, 'Haste you, the king's majesty is coming forth'. And immediately the master followed his majesty and spoke with his majesty opposite the royal stables and the king laid his hand on his shoulder and clapped him, where they spoke together by the space of a quarter of an hour. And thereafter the master directed this witness to ride to Perth in haste as he lost the Lord Gowrie's honour and his, and advertise his lordship that his majesty will be there with a few number immediately and cause make his dinner ready. Then this witness answered, 'Shall I ride presently?' The master answered 'No, but stay a while and follow the king and me until I speak with his majesty again'. And as his majesty was riding through the gap of the park wall, the master spoke to his majesty and immediately thereafter the master bade this witness to pass to Perth with all possible diligence according to his former direction. And at this witness's coming to Perth, which was shortly after 10 o'clock in the morning, he entered in the Lord Gowrie's chamber where he saw his lord speak with George Hay and Master Peter Hay, and as soon as my lord Gowrie saw this witness he came aside to this witness and enquired secretly what word he had brought from his brother and if he had brought a letter. This witness answered that he had brought no letter. 'What answer' (then said he) 'have you to me?' This witness answered then the master, his brother, bade tell his lordship that the king's majesty would be there at once and bade haste his dinner. Then the earl desired this witness to follow his lordship to the cabinet and enquired at him how his majesty had taken with his brother. He answered that he was well taken with and when he did his courtesy the king laid his hand upon his shoulder. The earl enquired what number of persons was with the king at the hunting, who answered that he knew not well but that there were sundry of his own with him and some Englishmen, and then the earl enquired what noblemen were with him: he answered, 'None but my lord duke'. And thereafter this witness passed to his own house in the town and took off his boots and returned to the earl within an hour, and as soon as the earl saw him in his chamber he called upon this witness and bade him put on his secret and plate sleeves. The witness enquired 'To what effect?' The earl answered, 'I have a highland man to take in the Shoegate'. And then this witness passed to his own house and put on his secret and plate sleeves, came back again to the Earl of Gowrie's house and about quarter to one the earl command this witness, 'Take up my dinner'. And this witness passed and took up the first service by reason George Craigengelt was sick. And at once the said earl passed to his dinner accompanied with Master John Moncrieff, laird of Pittencrieff, Master James Drummond and Alexander Peebles, baron of Findowie, and shortly after the first service was set down, my lord sitting at the table with the foresaid company, Andrew Ruthven came in from the master and rounded to the earl but heard not what he said. And shortly thereafter this witness, passing down to take up the second service, Master Alexander Ruthven and William Blair came in to the hall, my lord sitting at his dinner. And as soon as my lord saw them, he and his whole company rose from the table and then this witness, hearing my lord on foot, bade this witness send for his steel bonnet and gauntlet, believing that my lord was going to take the said highland man. And as the witness perceived my lord passing to the Inch, and not to the Shoegate, he sent home his steel bonnet and cast his gauntlet in the [...] pantry, and thereafter followed the earl to the Inch, where he saw the said earl meet his majesty, [Ludovic Stewart], duke [of Lennox] and [John Erskine], earl of Mar and come in altogether to the earl's house. And after his majesty had come to the earl's lodging, the Master of Ruthven enquired at this witness where the key of the gallery chamber was; who answered that he handled not the said key since the earl came in Scotland. Then the master bade this witness speak to Master William Rhind to give to him the said key, and the master passed up towards the gallery, Master William Rhind followed him and gave to him the said key and thereafter, immediately after his majesty's sitting down to his dinner, Master Thomas Cranston came to this witness and bade him go to the Earl of Gowrie, which this witness did. And the Earl of Gowrie in the outer chamber, where the king dined, spoke to this witness secretly and bade him pass up to the gallery to his brother. So he passed up and the earl followed him and they being all three together in the gallery chamber, whereof he had the key from Master William Rhind, the earl said to this witness, 'Stay still with my brother and do anything he bids you'. Then this witness turned to the master and enquired, 'What will you do with me, sir?' Then the master spoke to my lord, 'Let Andrew Henryson go in to the round of the chamber and I will lock him in and take the key with me', where this witness abided half an hour or thereby, locked by himself, having his secret, plate sleeves, sword and dagger with him and lacking his steel bonnet. And all this time this witness, fearing some evil to be done, sat upon his knees and prayed to God. And about the end of the half hour Master Alexander opened the door of the round and entered first within the same, having the king's majesty by the arm, and put on his hat on his head, drew forth this Andrew Henderson, witness, his dagger and said to the king, having the drawn dagger in his hand, 'Sir, you may be my prisoner, remember on my father's death'. And as he held the dagger to his majesty's breast this witness threw the same out of Master Alexander's hands and the time that the master held the dagger to his majesty's breast the king was beginning to speak. The master said, 'Hold your tongue, sir, or by Christ you shall die'. Then his majesty answered, 'Master Alexander, you and I were very great together and as touching your father's death, man, I was but a minor; my council might have done anything they pleased. And further, man, albeit you deprive me of my life you will not be king of Scotland, for I have both sons and daughters and there are men [in] this town and friends that will not leave it unrevenged'. Then Master Alexander answered, swearing with a great oath that it was neither his life nor blood that he craved. And the king said, 'What does it matter, albeit you take off your hat'. And then Master Alexander took off his hat and the king said 'What is it you crave man, and you crave not my life?'; who answered, 'Sir, it is but a promise'. The king answered, 'What promise?' The said Master Alexander answered, 'Sir, my lord my brother will tell you'. The king said 'Fetch hither your brother,' and next the said Master Alexander said to the king, 'Sir, you will not cry nor open the window until I come again', and the king promised so to do. Then Master Alexander passed forth and locked the door of the round and passed not from the door as he believes. In the meantime, the king entered in conference with this witness: 'How came you in here man?' And this witness answered, 'As God lives I am shut in here in the same way as a dog'. His majesty answered, 'Will my lord Gowrie do me any evil man?' This witness answered, 'I vow to God, sir, I shall die first'. And then the king bade this witness open the window, and he opened the window that looked to the Spey tower. The king answered, 'Fie, the wrong window man', and thereafter this witness passed to the other window nearest his majesty, to open the same. Before he got to the window Master Alexander opened the door and came in again and said to his majesty, 'By God, sir, there is no remedy', and then he rushed to the king and got him by both the hands, having a garter in his hands. Then the king answered, 'I am a free prince man, I will not be bound'. So his majesty cast loose his left hand from Master Alexander and at that same time this witness drew away the garter from Master Alexander, and his majesty leapt free from the said Master Alexander, and the said Master Alexander followed his majesty and, with his left hand about his majesty's neck, put his right fist in his majesty's mouth, so his majesty struggled to be free from him. This witness put his hand out of his majesty's mouth and thereafter the witness put his left hand over his majesty's left shoulder and pulled up the board of the window to which the said Master Alexander had thrust his majesty's head and shoulders and with the force of the drawing up of the window it pressed his majesty's body about his right side to the window, at the which time his majesty cried forth, 'Treason treason!' So the master said to this witness, 'Is there no help with thee? Woe worth thee, thou will cause us all die?' So trembling the master put his hand on the guard of his own sword and immediately the king's majesty put his hand on the master's hands and prevented him from drawing of his sword. And this way, they both being clasped together, came out of the cabinet to the chamber. And in the meantime this witness threw about the key then standing in the door of the head of the turnpike which entered to the chamber and opened the door thereof to eschew himself and to let his majesty's servants in. And as soon as he opened the door, John Ramsay came in at the same door with a hawk in his hand and passed to the king's majesty and went about him and drew his dagger, and as he saw him take aim with the dagger this witness passed forth at the said door and passed down the turnpike. It is thus written below, Henderson. And as the witness passed through the close and came to the fore-gate, the witness saw the Earl of Gowrie standing before the gate accompanied with diverse persons, of whom he remembers none, but remembers well that the Earl had this witness's knapscall on his head and two swords drawn in his hand. And immediately thereafter the witness passed to his own lodging, where he remained until the king passed out of the town, and then the witness passed to the bridge and walked up and down by the space of an hour and returned not again to the earl's lodging that night. And the time of his entry to his house that night this witness's wife enquired at this witness what trouble was within the place, to whom he answered, 'Well is me of one thing, that if I had not been there the king had been twice stabbed this night, but woe is me for the thing that is fallen out'. And this witness, being demanded by Master John Moncrieff after his returning from Falkland, 'Where have you been with your boots on?', answered he had been two or three miles beyond Earn and dared not tell him the verity by reason the Earl of Gowrie had discharged him to tell the errand he send him to anybody. And further, this witness declares that when he saw the Earl of Gowrie standing with his drawn swords before the gate, this witness spoke not to the earl, neither yet the earl to him at that time, but he passed to his own house. It is thus written below, Andrew Henderson.

[James Drummond], abbot of Inchaffray, sworn and examined, testifies that upon 5 August last, this witness being in Falkland, about 7 o'clock in the morning he met Master Alexander Ruthven accompanied with Andrew Ruthven and at that time only saluted the said Master Alexander, without any conference further at that time. And at that time he saw the said Master Alexander enter in conference with his majesty upon the green, between the stables and the park, which conference enduring for the space of a quarter of an hour, and the said Master Alexander accompanied his majesty until they came to the meadow. And at his returning from his majesty, this witness desired Master Alexander to breakfast with him by reason his own could not be so soon prepared, to whom Master Alexander answered he might not delay by reason his majesty had commanded him to await upon him. And as this witness passed to Falkland, leaving Master Alexander behind him, he met his horse with his man coming from Falkland to him. And then this witness, after he had breakfasted in Falkland, he took his journey the high way to Inchaffray, and the witness being but a mile north of Strathmiglo, his majesty, accompanied with [Ludovic Stewart], my lord duke [of Lennox], [Patrick Leslie of Pitcairlie, commendator of] Lindores, [John Graham], laird of Urquhill, John Hamilton of the Grange, Finlay Taylor and Master Alexander Ruthven, came by this witness riding the high way to Perth. Then immediately this witness mounted on horseback and accompanied his majesty to Perth where he saw [John Ruthven], earl of Gowrie meet his majesty in the Inch and passed in company with his majesty and his noblemen and servants to the Earl of Gowrie's lodging where they dined altogether. And after dinner, this witness being in the chamber at the north end of the hall, word passed through the hall that his majesty was passed away and riding towards Falkland. And then this witness, in company with [John Erskine, earl of] Mar and remainder present for the time, passed to the close and from that to the high street; and the Earl of Gowrie being present with them desired them to stay until he returned and advertised them of the verity thereof. And immediately the Earl of Gowrie passed up the stair and returned back and certified the witness and his colleagues of his majesty's departure. Then the lord duke, this witness and remainder cried for their horses to follow the king, then, as they were standing upon the high street, they heard a cry and a voice and the duke first declared, 'I am assured that is his majesty's voice, be where he will himself?' And immediately thereafter this witness saw his majesty looking out at a window of the round, lacking his hat and his face red, crying, 'Fie, help, my lord Mar, treason, treason! I am murdered'. And at that same instant by his judgement his majesty was pulled violently in at the same window and immediately thereafter this witness passed in haste up with the Earl of Mar and my lord duke to the chamber within the gallery where he saw, heard and did in all things according to the duke's deposition. It is thus written below, Inchaffray.

[Patrick Leslie of Pitcairlie], abbot of Lindores, sworn and examined, testifies according to the lord duke of Lennox in all things, adding that after dinner when word was of his majesty's departure towards Falkland and that they had altogether come down to the porter and had enquired at him if the king's majesty was gone forth, the porter answered he was not passed forth and [John Ruthven], earl of Gowrie affirmed that he was passed forth at the back gate. And the porter said to the Earl of Gowrie, 'That cannot be, my lord, because I have the key of the back gate'. And after that his majesty had cried out of the window of the round, 'Treason, treason!', and this witness saw James Erskine immediately lay hands upon the Earl of Gowrie upon the high street and immediately Sir Thomas Erskine [of Gogar] gripped the Earl of Gowrie, 'Fie, traitor, this is your deed, thou shall die'. Then the Earl of Gowrie answered, 'I know nothing in the matter'. Then instantly the Earl of Gowrie's men surrounded the said Sir Thomas Erskine and James Erskine from the Earl of Gowrie, who at once ran the space of half a pair of boot lengths from them towards [Duncan Campbell of] Glenorchy's house and drew forth his two swords and cried, 'I will either be at my own house or die by the gate'. And immediately thereafter the said earl, accompanied with 30 persons or thereby, passed within the said place where his majesty was for the time and shortly thereafter the witness, as appeared to him, saw a multitude of people carrying a timber beam towards the place. It is thus written below, Lindores.

Sir Thomas Erskine [of Gogar], of the age of 36 years, sworn, testifies according to [James Drummond], lord Inchaffray and [Patrick Leslie], lord Lindores, adding that immediately after this witness heard his majesty cry out of the window of the round, 'Fie, help, I am betrayed, they are murdering me', he ran with diligence towards the place to have helped his majesty. And before his entry, seeing [John Ruthven], earl of Gowrie, this witness and his brother gripped him by the neck and said to him, 'Traitor, this is your deed'. Which earl answered, 'What is the matter? I know nothing'. Immediately the earl's servants severed him from this witness and his brother and then this witness entered within the close. He assembled with Sir Hugh Herries, who demanded of the witness what the matter meant; and in the meantime the witness heard Sir John Ramsay crying out at the turnpike head, 'Fie, Sir Thomas, come up this turnpike directly to the head'. And as this witness had passed up five steps of the turnpike he saw and met with Master Alexander Ruthven, bloodied in two parts of his body, namely, in his face and in his neck. And immediately this witness cried to Sir Hugh Herries and others that were with him, 'Fie, this is the traitor, strike him'. And immediately he was struck by them and fell and as he was fallen he turned his face and cried, 'Alas, I had no wit of it', this witness being standing above him in the turnpike. Thereafter, this witness passed to the head of the turnpike and entered within the chamber at the end of the gallery where the king and Sir John Ramsay were there alone present. And at the first meeting, this witness said to his majesty, 'I thought your majesty would have accredited more to me than to have commanded me to await your majesty at the door if you thought it not fit to have taken me with you'. Whereupon his majesty answered to the witness, 'Alas, the traitor deceived me in that as he did in the leave, for I commanded him expressly to bring you to me, which he promised to me to do, and returned back as I thought to fetch you, but he did nothing but shut the door'. Shortly thereafter Sir Hugh Herries followed this witness in to the chamber and George Wilson, servant to James Erskine, and immediately thereafter Master Thomas Cranston, with his sword drawn in his hand, entered within the said chamber and the Earl of Gowrie followed him within the same chamber with a drawn sword in every one of his hands and a knapscall on his head, who struck at this witness and his colleagues a certain space, likewise they defended them and struck again. And that same time the said witness was hurt in the right hand by Master Thomas Cranston. And this witness heard my lord Gowrie speak some words at his entry but understands them not. And lastly, Sir John Ramsay gave the Earl of Gowrie a deadly strike and then the earl leant him to his sword and the witness saw a man hold him up, whom he knew not, and as soon as the earl fell to the ground Master Thomas Cranston and the remainder who accompanied him departed and passed down the turnpike. And the witness remembers that at that time there were more persons in the chamber with the Earl of Gowrie by Master Thomas Cranston but knew none of them, except he believes that a black man that was there in company within the chamber was Hugh Moncreiffe, brother to [William Moncreiffe], laird of Moncreiffe, but the witness knows not well whether or not it was Hugh Moncreiffe. It is thus written below, Sir Thomas Erskine.

Sir John Ramsay, of the age of 23 years or thereby, sworn, testifies that immediately after he had dined the day libelled in [John Ruthven], earl of Gowrie's house, he took his majesty's hawk from John Murray to the effect the said John might have dined. And the witness, missing his majesty and assembling with [John Moncrieff], laird of Pittencrieff in the Earl of Gowrie's hall, and demanding of Pittencrieff where his majesty was, the said laird first convoyed the witness to the chamber where his majesty dined, thereafter to the yard, hoping that his majesty had been there. And missing his majesty in the yard, the said laird convoyed the witness up to a fair gallery where this witness was never before, where, having remained a certain space beholding the gallery, they came both down to the close where they met with Master Thomas Cranston in the middle of the close, who said to them that his majesty was away upon horseback at the Inch. Whereupon this witness and Pittencrieff separated and the witness passed out of the gate to his stable to have got his horse. And being standing at the stable door, he heard his majesty cry, knew his highness's voice but understood not what he spoke. Whereupon he immediately came within the close and finding a turnpike door open he entered within the same and ran up the turnpike until he came to the door upon the head thereof, and hearing a struggle and din of men's feet he ran with his whole force at the door of the turnpike head, which enters to the chamber at the end of the gallery. The witness having in the meantime his hawk on his hand and having battered down the door, he saw his majesty and Master Alexander Ruthven in each other's arms, struggling and wrestling together, his majesty having Master Alexander's head under his arm and Master Alexander, being almost on his knees, had his hand upon his majesty's face and mouth. And his majesty, seeing the witness said, 'Fie, strike him low because he has a secret doublet upon him', whereupon the witness cast the hawk from him and drew his dagger wherewith he struck the said Master Alexander. And immediately after he was struck his majesty thrust him down the stair whereat this witness had entered. Thereafter this witness proceeded to a window and looking out thereat and seeing Sir Thomas Erskine [of Gogar], the witness, cried, 'Sir Thomas, come up this turnpike directly to the head'. In the meantime his majesty put his foot upon the hawk's leash and held her a long time until the witness came and took her up again. And then Sir Thomas Erskine entered, and in the rest testifies according to Sir Thomas Erskine in all points. And further says that when this witness entered first within the chamber he saw a man standing behind his majesty's back whom he in no way knew nor remembers not what apparelling he had on, but after that this witness had struck Master Alexander he saw that man no more. It is thus written below, Sir John Ramsay.

John Graham of Urquhill, sworn and examined, testifies according to [Ludovic Stewart], lord duke of Lennox and [John Erskine], earl of Mar in all things providing the same source of knowledge, adding that this witness, the time that he was at dinner in the hall with my lord duke and Earl of Mar, he saw the king and Master Alexander Ruthven pass through the hall, up the turnpike towards the gallery, and as this witness, John Hamilton and others were following, Master Alexander cried, 'Back gentlemen, stay, for so it is his highness's will'.

John Graham of Balgowan, of the age of 50 years or thereby, married, testifies according to [Ludovic Stewart], lord duke [of Lennox] in all things, adding that this witness, the day libelled, after the death of [John Ruthven], earl of Gowrie and his brother and hearing his majesty report that Master Alexander pressed to have bound his highness's hands with a garter, this witness found a garter at the side of the round door among the coarse grass. And immediately thereafter this witness presented the same garter to his highness and at the sight thereof his majesty said that the same was the garter wherewith Master Alexander pressed to have bound his hands. And then Sir Thomas Erskine [of Gogar] grabbed the same garter and said that he would keep it, which he has yet in keeping. It is thus written below, J. Graham of Balgowan.

I, Master John Moncrieff, testifies as follows after: namely, that day I was still present with [John Ruthven], my lord Gowrie to the time I heard his majesty cry 'Treason!' and saw him put his arm forth at the window of the round, and then left him, for I conceived in my heart that it was a plain treason conspired against his majesty and was induced hereto in respect of the presumptions following: First, I saw the king's majesty and the late Master Alexander Ruthven, my lord's brother, go forth at the hall door alone, whereas his majesty had no weapons and Master Alexander had a sword. Next, I saw his majesty come in quiet and sober manner to the town, through which apparently he would have no evil purpose in his mind. Item, the said Master Alexander riding to Falkland in the morning was obscured from me and my brother Hugh, where he was, and I having enquired of my brother Hugh where he was riding to he knew nothing thereof, so that neither he nor I could get trial of the same. Item, I, having enquired at Andrew Henderson himself, who rode to Falkland with the master and returned two hours before him deceived me and answered that he had been two or three miles above the town, and also the said Andrew had another doublet on him than he used commonly and was more buxom, and, as appeared, might have contained a secret. Item, that day being the council day of the town, my lord excused himself in respect of his affairs. Item, I, having pressed him to subscribe a confirmation of a lady, first refused in respect foresaid, always passed it thereafter. Item, my lord delayed longer from his dinner than he used and albeit Andrew Ruthven who was with the master came and rounded to my lord at the table, he pretended to be unaware of all things to the time the said Master Alexander came himself, and then rose from the table and met his majesty. Item, my lord obscured altogether that he knew the coming of any man until the master came. Item, Master Thomas Cranston was the first that I heard cry, 'The king's majesty is away'. Item, after [Ludovic Stewart], my lord duke [of Lennox] and [John Erskine], my lord Mar and his majesty's servants were in the close, my lord Gowrie came back again to the hall saying the king was away, so that, as I thought, he would have each man thinking so; and I thought his majesty was not received with that sincere entertainment as became. Item, after his majesty's riding away, my brother Hugh came to my house and I enquiring of him what he thought of these matters, answered before God so far as I can perceive, 'I believe it shall become evident to be a plain treason on my lord's part'. And I enquiring at him if he knew anything thereof, answered he knew nothing but he and Harry Ruthven, after all things were ended, fell in conference regarding this and he thought things were likely. Lastly, Andrew Henderson's letter moves me most of all, and upon my salvation and condemnation I know no further in this matter nor yet can remember of any other circumstance or presumption might have induced me to conceive the former treason which I apprehended in manner foresaid. It is thus written below, Master John Moncrieff.

I, Andrew Ray, one of the bailies of the burgh of Perth, by this deposition testify upon my conscience and in the sight of God as I shall answer to him in the great day, that upon 5 August 1600, I, being in the late [John Ruthven], earl of Gowrie's lodging when his majesty was there, saw his majesty after his dinner, accompanied with [Alexander Ruthven], master of Gowrie, rise from the table and go out of the chamber where he had dined, but to what place I know not, being beholding the said late Earl of Gowrie's entertainment of the noblemen in drinking of his majesty's health to them, which his majesty before his rising from the table had commanded him to do. And that after that the lords, namely [Ludovic Stewart], my lord duke [of Lennox], [John Erskine], my lord Mar, [Patrick Leslie], lord Lindores and [James Drummond], lord Inchaffray, with sundry of his majesty's gentlemen and servants, accompanied with the Earl of Gowrie in person, a short space after dinner had missed his majesty and enquired where he should be. They went to the fore-gate and enquired at the porter if he saw the king go forth at the fore-gate and heard the porter answer that his majesty was not gone forth that way. Also that the Earl of Gowrie said to the porter, 'You lie, knave, he is forth'. And the porter replied that he should give his head in case his majesty were forth. Yet upon the Earl of Gowrie's assurance that his majesty was forth to the Inch, the lords rushed out in haste at the fore-gate and enquiring where the king was, I, being with them, I saw one force up the long mullioned window in the north side of the turret upon the high gate, but who forced it up I know not. And further saw clearly his majesty, bare-headed, thrust forth his head and arm at the foresaid window and heard his majesty crying loudly, 'Fie, treason, treason, and murder, help Earl of Mar!' Whereupon I, being very aghast and wonderfully astonished at that cruel and terrible sight and pitiful and woeful cry, I not knowing what the matter meant but perceiving his majesty in extreme and great danger, ran with all possible diligence through the streets, crying loudly, 'Fie, treason, treason against the king, for God's sake all honest men haste and relieve the king!', and commanded to ring the common bell that all men might come in haste to his majesty's relief. And then I returned with all possible diligence with a great number of the people with me and came afore the foresaid turret and window where I saw his majesty first cry out. And than I cried out, 'How is the king?' But my lord duke and my lord Mar answered, 'The king is well (praise be God)'. Then I cried again up to his majesty and showed his majesty that the bailies and township had come there in all haste to supply and relieve his majesty and therefore besought his majesty to command what was his majesty's will and best to be done. And then his majesty beckoned forth his hand to me and to the people, commanding me to cause the people to retire to their lodging, which commandment I at once obeyed and commanded all manner of men to retire themselves to their lodgings, and likewise passed to the market cross and by open proclamation commanded in his highness's name that all men should retire to their lodgings under the pain of treason; who obeyed immediately after my charge. And this I testify to be of verity by the faith and truth of my body so far as I justly can remember. I, witness of the which, I have subscribed this deposition with my hand at Perth, 13 October 1600, before these witnesses: Master Patrick Galloway, minister to his majesty, James Drummond of Letchill, Oliver Young, Constantine Mallice, Thomas Johnstone, bailies, Henry Elder, clerk, Robert Anderson, Andrew Arnott and William Jack, burgesses of Perth. It is thus written below, Andrew Ray, bailie, with my hand, Master Patrick Galloway, witness, James Drummond, witness, Oliver Young, bailie, witness, Thomas Johnstone, bailie, witness, Robert Anderson, witness, Andrew Arnott, witness, William Jack, witness, Henry Elder, scribe, witness.

Robert Christie, porter to the late John [Ruthven], earl of Gowrie, of the age of 30 years, single, testifies that he was porter to the Earl of Gowrie on 5 August libelled, likewise he was by the space of five weeks of before. And shortly after the dinner this witness saw [Ludovic Stewart], my lord duke [of Lennox], [John Erskine], earl of Mar and the Earl of Gowrie come to the close and my lord duke enquired at this witness if his majesty was passed out of the close. The witness answered that he was not forth. Then the Lord Mar said, 'Friend, tell me the verity if his majesty be forth or not'. And he answered, 'In truth he is not forth'. The Earl of Gowrie, looking with an angry countenance, said, 'Thou lied, he is forth at the back gate and through the Inch'. Then this witness answered, 'That cannot be, my lord, for I have the key of the back gate and of all the gates of the place'. Thereafter this witness heard and saw his majesty looking out of the window of the round and crying, 'Treason, treason, fie, help, help, my lord Mar!' And at once my lord duke and Earl of Mar and others ran up the great turnpike to the gallery and thereafter the Lord Gowrie came from the high street within the close having a steel bonnet on his head and a drawn sword in each hand, accompanied with Alexander and Harry Ruthven, Patrick Eviott and Hugh Moncreiffe and Master Thomas Cranston, all having drawn swords in their hands, and passed altogether with my lord up the old turnpike, but what was done within the house and place thereafter knows not but by report. Neither saw he any timber beam brought to the place by any of the town and knows no more in the matter. It is thus written below, Robert Christie.

Alexander Blair, younger, of Balthayock, sworn and examined, testifies according to that immediately preceding except that he saw not [John Ruthven], my lord Gowrie pass with his company and drawn swords up the turnpike but saw Alexander and Harry Ruthven and Hugh Moncreiffe come down the little turnpike where they and my lord had ascended, the said three persons having drawn swords in their hands, but saw not Patrick Eviott there. And this witness says that after the tumult was risen and this witness pressed to enter within the place he was a little prevented by them in the place but they yielded together and the witness got entry. Likewise he saw a timber beam brought in from the town and set up at the wall of the close but who brought the same in he knows not. It is thus written below, A. Blair, apparent heir of Balthayock.

George Hay, prior of Charterhouse, of the age of 28 years or thereby, married, testifies according to [Ludovic Stewart], lord duke of Lennox in all things after his majesty's entry in Perth the day libelled, adding that that same day, the witness having concerns in Perth with [John Ruthven], earl of Gowrie and speaking with him in his own place, he saw Andrew Henderson come in booted from Falkland and heard the said Lord Gowrie enquire of the said Andrew who was with his majesty in Falkland. And thereafter the said earl took the said Andrew Henderson to the cabinet and after a certain space the earl, coming to the chamber, he gave this witness his dispatch saying that he had to do that day and might not await on his errand and bade him come any other day.

Master Peter Hay, of the age of 30 years or thereby, married, testifies according to George Hay in all things the witness immediately preceding.

Robert Graham of Thornick, sworn and examined, testifies according to [Ludovic Stewart], duke of Lennox after that his majesty entered in Perth.

Oliver Young, bailie in Perth, sworn and examined, testifies that the day libelled this witness was in [John Ruthven], earl of Gowrie's lodging where he saw the king dine and after dinner saw the king's majesty and Master Alexander Ruthven pass alone through the hall and up the turnpike. And immediately thereafter this witness passed to his own lodging in the town where he abided until the cry and tumult rose. And immediately this witness ran to the place libelled, his majesty cried out at the window and commanded this witness by name to prevent the tumult of the people. The which this witness obeyed and did and saw Hugh Moncreiffe coming out of the place with his face being bloody, and Harry Ruthven, one of the defenders, at the mouth of the Wattergait with a drawn sword in his hand and knows no more in the matter.

James Drummond of Pitcairn, sworn and examined, testifies according to that immediately preceding in all things, adding that as this witness, immediately after the cry rose, coming to the place libelled, he met upon the high street Alexander Ruthven, one of the defenders, having a drawn sword in his hand and crying 'Fire and powder', and knows no more in the matter.

William Rhind, butcher in Perth, of the age of 30 years or thereby, married, testifies that he saw within the close of Perth, after the affray rose, Patrick Eviott and Hugh Moncreiffe, both bleeding, having drawn swords in their hands.

Henry Leys, burgess of Perth, sworn and examined, testifies according to James Drummond and William Rhind, but he saw not Patrick Eviott there.

George Wilson, servant to James Erskine, of the age of 24 years or thereby, single, testifies according to Sir Thomas Erskine [of Gogar] in all things, by reason this witness was in company with the said Sir Thomas after the first time that he and James Erskine, his brother, had gripped [John Ruthven], earl of Gowrie and was separated from him by his servants. And immediately thereafter this witness accompanied the said Sir Thomas Erskine up to the turnpike into the chamber where his majesty was, where he saw as the said Sir Thomas has testified in all things.

David Rhind, butcher in Perth, sworn and examined, testifies according to James Drummond and heard Alexander Ruthven cry for powder but saw not Patrick Eviott.

Gilbert Richardson in Perth, of the age of 24 years or thereby, single, testifies according to James Drummond in all things and David Rhind.

John Murray of Arbany, of the age of 58 years or thereby, married, testifies the day libelled the witness came to Perth after dinner where he heard his majesty crying out at the window of the round, 'Fie, treason, my lord Mar, help!' Immediately thereafter [John Erskine], my lord Mar and [Ludovic Stewart], duke [of Lennox] ran up the broad turnpike and the witness followed them in the close where he saw [John Ruthven], lord Gowrie, having a steel bonnet on his head and two drawn swords, one in each hand, and saw the said earl pass up the turnpike accompanied with certain of his servants, having drawn swords in their hands, of whom he knew none.

Thomas Burrell, burgess of Perth, sworn and examined, testifies according to James Drummond, adding that the time of the affray this witness, entering within the close of the place libelled, he saw standing in the close with drawn swords in their hands Alexander and Harry Ruthven and Hugh Moncreiffe, bleeding in his face. And at that same time this witness saw Master Thomas Cranston come down the black turnpike and he took out of his hand his sword and heard the said Alexander Ruthven cry for fire and powder, and saw not Patrick Eviott there.

Alexander George Forrest, tailor in Perth, of the age of 40 years or thereby, married, testifies the day libelled he saw George Craigengelt and Walter Cruickshank, lackey, standing in the yard with drawn swords.

William Robertson, notary in Perth, of the age of 34 years or thereby, married, testifies the day libelled, this witness being within the close of the place libelled, he saw [John Ruthven], lord Gowrie standing in the close accompanied with seven or eight persons of whom he knew none, the said earl then having a steel bonnet on his head and a drawn sword in each hand, at the which sight this witness, being afraid, passed out of the place and knows no more in the matter.

Robert Galbraith, servant to the king's majesty, of the age of 30 years, testifies according to [Ludovic Stewart], lord duke of Lennox in all things by reason this witness all that day was in company with his majesty, and after that his majesty had cried out at the window, 'Treason!', this witness followed the duke and [John Erskine], earl of Mar up the turnpike and testifies as they have testified.

Robert Brown, servant to the king's majesty, testifies according to that immediately preceding in all points because this witness the time libelled accompanied John Hamilton to fetch the hammers up to the gallery. And this witness passed up the little black turnpike and at his first entry within the chamber he saw [John Ruthven], earl of Gowrie lying dead, there being at that time in company with his majesty Sir Thomas Erskine [of Gogar], Sir Hugh Herries, Sir John Ramsay and George Wilson.

James Bogg, porter to his majesty, sworn and examined, testifies that he saw the king's majesty and Master Alexander Ruthven pass through the hall to the chamber and saw that day George Craigengelt with a drawn sword in his hand, accompanied with certain rascals, and in all other things testifies according to [Ludovic Stewart], lord duke [of Lennox] and [John Erskine], earl of Mar in all things.

John Bogg, servant to the king's majesty in the ale cellar, sworn and examined, testifies according to James Bogg.

Alexander Peebles, burgess of Perth, of the age of 30 years or thereby, married, testifies the day libelled, this witness being within his own house opposite [John Ruthven], earl of Gowrie's lodging, as soon as his mother heard the common bell ring she locked the door and held him in all the time. And saw at that time the Earl of Gowrie enter in at the gate with two drawn swords, one in each hand, and a lackey put a steel bonnet on his head. And a certain space thereafter the witness saw Hugh Moncreiffe come out of the place with a bloody head and Patrick Eviott's man likewise bleeding. And also saw Patrick Eviott come out of the gate but remembers not if he had a sword in his hand, and saw Alexander Ruthven also come forth with a sword drawn in his hand. It is thus written below, Alexander Peebles.

  1. NAS, PA2/16, f.2r. Back
  2. NAS, PA2/16, f.3r-7r. Back
  3. 'Ditty' written in margin, in contemporary hand. Back
  4. APS interpolation. Back
  5. 'Parthie' in mss. Back
  6. A contemporary comment in the margin refers to the 'ditty' against Alexander Ruthven. Back
  7. APS interpolation. Back
  8. 'Colin' written in superscript above 'Patrick', the latter name having been crossed out. All modifications written in contemporary hand. Back
  9. NAS, PA2/16, f.7r-11v. Back
  10. This must be the battering ram referred to in the second Latin summons at 1600/11/8 above. Back
  11. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, apparently so called because it was designed to be worn concealed under the outer clothes. Back
  12. Defined in DSL as a sleeve consisting of or reinforced by plate-armour. Back
  13. Word unclear. Back
  14. The following last 9 lines of NAS, PA2/16, f.8v are difficult to read due to smudging. Back
  15. Defined in DSL as a kind of close-fitting metal defensive headpiece, a metal skull-cap, commonly worn under a bonnet or other fabric covering. Common in the 16th century. Back
  16. At the bottom of NAS, PA2/16, f.9v there is a dark mark on the left of the folio that obscures the contents. Back
  17. Sections of text in NAS, PA2/16, f.10r-v are obscured by blotting. Back
  18. Sic. 'Hay' in 1600/11/8 above. Back
  19. Some this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  20. Some of this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  21. The last 12 lines of NAS PA2/16, f.11r (the following two and a half paragraphs) are obscured by a large blot. Back
  22. 'Alexander' scored out in APS. Back
  23. NAS, PA2/16, f.11v-12r.
    Text of act obscured by large blots.
    Back
  24. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r. Some of text obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  25. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  26. APS interpolation. Back
  27. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r-v. Much of this act is obscured by a blot in the folio. Back
  28. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  29. NAS, PA2/16, f.12v-13v. Back
  30. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  31. Word unclear. Back
  32. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  33. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  34. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  35. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  36. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v-15r. Back
  37. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  38. NAS, PA2/16, f.15r-v. Back
  39. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  40. NAS, PA2/16, f.16r-v. Back
  41. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  42. Possibly Spoutwells, Tayside. Back
  43. Blank spaces denote 2 deleted words, which are illegible. Back
  44. NAS, PA2/16, f.16v-17v. Bottom right hand corner of f.17r. is torn off, and consequently the left hand side of f.17v. Back
  45. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  46. 'and that the' superscript in contemporary hand. Back
  47. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  48. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  49. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  50. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  51. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  52. NAS, PA2/16, f.17v-19r. Back
  53. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  54. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  55. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  56. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  57. Word unclear. Back
  58. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  59. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  60. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  61. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  62. This act is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/68. Back
  63. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Mss returns to usual hand. Back
  64. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  65. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  66. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  67. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  68. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  69. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v-20r. Back
  70. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  71. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r. Back
  72. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  73. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r-v. Back
  74. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  75. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  76. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  77. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  78. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  79. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  80. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  81. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  82. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  83. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  84. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  85. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  86. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  87. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  88. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  89. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  90. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  91. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  92. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  93. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r-v. Back
  94. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v. Back
  95. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  96. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v-22r. Back
  97. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  98. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r. Back
  99. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  100. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r-v. Back
  101. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  102. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v. Back
  103. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  104. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v-23r. Back
  105. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  106. Followed by a partly illegible deleted word, perhaps 'estate'? Back
  107. NAS, PA2/16, f.23r-v. Back
  108. 'P' printed in margin beside heading. Back
  109. NAS, PA2/16, f.23v-24r. Back
  110. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  111. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r. Back
  112. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  113. Uncertain meaning. Back
  114. Defined in DSL as 'The name of a water-fowl, wintering in Orkney and Shetland, and variously described as a variety of the teal, the pochard and the widgeon'. Back
  115. According to DSL, 'Origin and precise application obscure: the name of some (apparently aquatic) bird ... the guillemot or the razorbill, ? from the cries'. Back
  116. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r-v. Back
  117. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  118. NAS, PA2/16, f.24v-25r. Back
  119. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  120. NAS, PA2/16, f.25r-v. Back
  121. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  122. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  123. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  124. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  125. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  126. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, with or without sleeves, usually of leather lined or padded, and in the 16th century sometimes iron-plated or faced with mail. Back
  127. NAS, PA2/16, f.26r-27r. Back
  128. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  129. 'March' crossed out. Back
  130. NAS, PA2/16, f.27r-v. Back
  131. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  132. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v. Back
  133. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  134. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v-28r. Back
  135. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  136. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  137. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  138. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  139. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  140. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v. Back
  141. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  142. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v-29r. Back
  143. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  144. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  145. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  146. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  147. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  148. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  149. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  150. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r-v. Back
  151. 'V' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  152. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v. Back
  153. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  154. NAS, PA2/16, f.29v. Back
  155. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  156. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v-30r. Back
  157. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  158. NAS, PA2/16, f.30r-32r. Back
  159. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  160. The text of this act, not including the title heading, is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/22. Back
  161. NAS, PA2/16, f.32r-34v. Back
  162. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  163. 'portioner' scored out and replaced with 'feu farmer'. Back
  164. Inserted in superscript. Back
  165. Inserted in superscript. Back
  166. Followed by a deleted and illegible word. Back
  167. NAS, PA2/16, f.34v-35r. Back
  168. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  169. 'never' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  170. 'out' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  171. NAS, PA2/16, f.35v - blank folio page. Back
Legislation: private acts
Act regarding the disinheriting and inability of the brother and posterity of [John Ruthven], earl of Gowrie

Our sovereign lord and estates of this realm, understanding the obstinate malice of treasonable rebels takes so deep root in the hearts of their perverted posterity that the mercy, favour and clemency of their native princes graciously extended to them cannot expel their natural inclination to treasonable cruelty and ingratitude, but by the contrary furnishes to them convenient occasions of desperate revenges against the prince for the lawful and condign punishment of their treasonable forbearers according to their demerits, as the horrible treason lately attempted against his highness's most noble person by the late John, earl of Gowrie and the late Master Alexander Ruthven, his brother, following the footsteps of William [Ruthven], earl of Gowrie, their father, whose manifold treasons his majesty had pardoned and remitted to them and his remaining posterity and restored them to the integrity of their same and estate manifestly declared; for remedy whereof, and to the effect that the severity of punishment may terrify and divert such malicious and wicked persons as by favourable and clement means cannot be restrained from attempting of so detestable and treasonable enterprises, our said sovereign lord, with advice and consent of the whole estates of this present parliament, statutes and ordains that the apparent heirs and successors of the said late John, earl of Gowrie and the late Master Alexander Ruthven, his brother, and their whole brothers, either lawful or natural procreated of the said late William, earl of Gowrie, and the whole remaining posterity, heirs and successors of the said late John, earl of Gowrie and Master Alexander Ruthven, his brother, are and in all time coming shall be unable and incapable to enjoy, hold or possess any honours, dignities, offices, benefices, lands, heritages, rooms, possessions, goods, gear, successions or other rights or commodities whatsoever within this realm, and that our said sovereign lord and his successors by the right of his crown shall have full and undoubted right to all and whatsoever lands, heritages, offices, benefices, tacks, steadings, rooms, possessions, goods, gear, successions, hope and appearance of succession and other goods, rights or titles whatsoever which either appertained or in any way might have belonged or hereafter may befall or appertain to the said late John, earl of Gowrie and the late Master Alexander Ruthven or to any other of their brothers, their heirs, posterity or successors foresaid through the rebellion and memory of the said persons or inability of their brothers, posterity or others respectively foresaid, to the which persons above-written and every one of them our sovereign lord and his successors foresaid shall now and in all time coming succeed and to all such others of his highness's lieges whom they or any of them, their brothers or posterity might have succeeded to in any time bygone or to come; and that the said brethren of the said late John, earl of Gowrie and Master Alexander Ruthven and their posterity shall in all time coming be banished and expelled out of this realm and whole bounds of his highness's dominions under the pains of death, to be executed without delay upon any of them that shall contravene the same. And to the effect that the exemplary punishment of the foresaid treason and constant observation and execution of the premises may be a terror to all posterity ever to attempt the like, our said sovereign lord and estates foresaid statute and ordain that whatsoever advocate, clerk, writer or other of his highness's subjects of whatsoever estate or degree give counsel, advice, help or assistance to form, write, devise or propose any pardon, remission, rehabilitation or restitution of the posterity of the said rebels and traitors or reduction of the forfeiture of the memory of the said traitors and their posterity or assist them relating thereto directly or indirectly in judgement or outwith or shall presume to make suit, request or supplication to our sovereign lord or his successors in their favour, being tried and lawfully convicted of any of the said points, shall incur the pains of treason in their bodies, lands and goods notwithstanding of whatsoever warrant to be purchased relating thereto of the princes for the time, with consent of parliament or otherwise, which shall be no impediment to the said princes or their successor to cause challenge, accuse, convict and punish the said persons or their posterity for that, as for an unpardonable treason, notwithstanding of the warrants foresaid, in granting whereof the said princes for the time and their successors shall be reputed minors and have perpetual privilege and liberty of revocation thereof and punishing the purchasers and users of the same in manner foresaid.

  1. NAS, PA2/16, f.2r. Back
  2. NAS, PA2/16, f.3r-7r. Back
  3. 'Ditty' written in margin, in contemporary hand. Back
  4. APS interpolation. Back
  5. 'Parthie' in mss. Back
  6. A contemporary comment in the margin refers to the 'ditty' against Alexander Ruthven. Back
  7. APS interpolation. Back
  8. 'Colin' written in superscript above 'Patrick', the latter name having been crossed out. All modifications written in contemporary hand. Back
  9. NAS, PA2/16, f.7r-11v. Back
  10. This must be the battering ram referred to in the second Latin summons at 1600/11/8 above. Back
  11. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, apparently so called because it was designed to be worn concealed under the outer clothes. Back
  12. Defined in DSL as a sleeve consisting of or reinforced by plate-armour. Back
  13. Word unclear. Back
  14. The following last 9 lines of NAS, PA2/16, f.8v are difficult to read due to smudging. Back
  15. Defined in DSL as a kind of close-fitting metal defensive headpiece, a metal skull-cap, commonly worn under a bonnet or other fabric covering. Common in the 16th century. Back
  16. At the bottom of NAS, PA2/16, f.9v there is a dark mark on the left of the folio that obscures the contents. Back
  17. Sections of text in NAS, PA2/16, f.10r-v are obscured by blotting. Back
  18. Sic. 'Hay' in 1600/11/8 above. Back
  19. Some this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  20. Some of this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  21. The last 12 lines of NAS PA2/16, f.11r (the following two and a half paragraphs) are obscured by a large blot. Back
  22. 'Alexander' scored out in APS. Back
  23. NAS, PA2/16, f.11v-12r.
    Text of act obscured by large blots.
    Back
  24. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r. Some of text obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  25. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  26. APS interpolation. Back
  27. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r-v. Much of this act is obscured by a blot in the folio. Back
  28. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  29. NAS, PA2/16, f.12v-13v. Back
  30. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  31. Word unclear. Back
  32. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  33. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  34. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  35. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  36. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v-15r. Back
  37. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  38. NAS, PA2/16, f.15r-v. Back
  39. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  40. NAS, PA2/16, f.16r-v. Back
  41. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  42. Possibly Spoutwells, Tayside. Back
  43. Blank spaces denote 2 deleted words, which are illegible. Back
  44. NAS, PA2/16, f.16v-17v. Bottom right hand corner of f.17r. is torn off, and consequently the left hand side of f.17v. Back
  45. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  46. 'and that the' superscript in contemporary hand. Back
  47. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  48. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  49. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  50. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  51. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  52. NAS, PA2/16, f.17v-19r. Back
  53. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  54. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  55. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  56. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  57. Word unclear. Back
  58. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  59. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  60. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  61. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  62. This act is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/68. Back
  63. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Mss returns to usual hand. Back
  64. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  65. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  66. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  67. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  68. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  69. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v-20r. Back
  70. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  71. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r. Back
  72. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  73. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r-v. Back
  74. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  75. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  76. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  77. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  78. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  79. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  80. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  81. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  82. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  83. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  84. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  85. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  86. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  87. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  88. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  89. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  90. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  91. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  92. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  93. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r-v. Back
  94. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v. Back
  95. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  96. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v-22r. Back
  97. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  98. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r. Back
  99. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  100. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r-v. Back
  101. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  102. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v. Back
  103. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  104. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v-23r. Back
  105. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  106. Followed by a partly illegible deleted word, perhaps 'estate'? Back
  107. NAS, PA2/16, f.23r-v. Back
  108. 'P' printed in margin beside heading. Back
  109. NAS, PA2/16, f.23v-24r. Back
  110. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  111. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r. Back
  112. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  113. Uncertain meaning. Back
  114. Defined in DSL as 'The name of a water-fowl, wintering in Orkney and Shetland, and variously described as a variety of the teal, the pochard and the widgeon'. Back
  115. According to DSL, 'Origin and precise application obscure: the name of some (apparently aquatic) bird ... the guillemot or the razorbill, ? from the cries'. Back
  116. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r-v. Back
  117. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  118. NAS, PA2/16, f.24v-25r. Back
  119. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  120. NAS, PA2/16, f.25r-v. Back
  121. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  122. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  123. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  124. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  125. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  126. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, with or without sleeves, usually of leather lined or padded, and in the 16th century sometimes iron-plated or faced with mail. Back
  127. NAS, PA2/16, f.26r-27r. Back
  128. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  129. 'March' crossed out. Back
  130. NAS, PA2/16, f.27r-v. Back
  131. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  132. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v. Back
  133. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  134. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v-28r. Back
  135. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  136. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  137. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  138. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  139. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  140. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v. Back
  141. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  142. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v-29r. Back
  143. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  144. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  145. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  146. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  147. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  148. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  149. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  150. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r-v. Back
  151. 'V' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  152. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v. Back
  153. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  154. NAS, PA2/16, f.29v. Back
  155. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  156. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v-30r. Back
  157. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  158. NAS, PA2/16, f.30r-32r. Back
  159. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  160. The text of this act, not including the title heading, is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/22. Back
  161. NAS, PA2/16, f.32r-34v. Back
  162. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  163. 'portioner' scored out and replaced with 'feu farmer'. Back
  164. Inserted in superscript. Back
  165. Inserted in superscript. Back
  166. Followed by a deleted and illegible word. Back
  167. NAS, PA2/16, f.34v-35r. Back
  168. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  169. 'never' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  170. 'out' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  171. NAS, PA2/16, f.35v - blank folio page. Back
Act abolishing the surname of Ruthven

Forasmuch as the surname of Ruthven has been so naturally bent these many years bygone to attempt most high and horrible treasons against his majesty and his most noble progenitors that his majesty is thereby brought in vehement suspicion of their whole race and of his natural clemency, being careful that the infamy justly inflicted to the guilty shall not disgrace such of his subjects as are innocent of the said treasons, for extinguishing of the memory of the treasonable committers of the crimes foresaid and removing of the blot that with the surname might follow such of his highness's lieges as have not been participant of the said crimes, his majesty, with advice and consent of the estates of this present parliament, statutes and ordains that the surname of Ruthven shall now and in all time coming be extinguished and abolished for ever, and that such of his highness's subjects bearing the said surname in time past as are free and innocent of the said crimes of treason attempted against his majesty and his predecessors in manner foresaid shall be held and astricted to renounce the said surname of Ruthven, and never to use the same in any time coming, and to take to themselves, their bairns and posterity any other honest and undisgraced surname between now and Whitsunday [31 May] next, whereby they, their bairns and posterity shall be called in all time coming, and to use the same in all contracts, bonds, pacts, infeftments, writs, securities, proclamations of banns, subscribing of letters, speeches, conferences and other occasions whatsoever under the pain of banishment during the king's pleasure to be executed against them and every one of them with all [rigour] and extremity as often and so often as they or any of them does in the contrary; and ordain the name of the barony and place of Ruthven to be changed and called in all time coming the place and barony of Huntingtower. And to the effect that the foresaid odious fact may abide and remain manifest to the posterity, the said estates ordain the round of the said lodging in Perth within the which his majesty's murder was treasonably attempted to be demolished and razed to the ground and a monument to be erected in the place thereof containing inscription of the danger wherein his majesty was and form of the same conspiracy and manner of his highness's delivery.

  1. NAS, PA2/16, f.2r. Back
  2. NAS, PA2/16, f.3r-7r. Back
  3. 'Ditty' written in margin, in contemporary hand. Back
  4. APS interpolation. Back
  5. 'Parthie' in mss. Back
  6. A contemporary comment in the margin refers to the 'ditty' against Alexander Ruthven. Back
  7. APS interpolation. Back
  8. 'Colin' written in superscript above 'Patrick', the latter name having been crossed out. All modifications written in contemporary hand. Back
  9. NAS, PA2/16, f.7r-11v. Back
  10. This must be the battering ram referred to in the second Latin summons at 1600/11/8 above. Back
  11. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, apparently so called because it was designed to be worn concealed under the outer clothes. Back
  12. Defined in DSL as a sleeve consisting of or reinforced by plate-armour. Back
  13. Word unclear. Back
  14. The following last 9 lines of NAS, PA2/16, f.8v are difficult to read due to smudging. Back
  15. Defined in DSL as a kind of close-fitting metal defensive headpiece, a metal skull-cap, commonly worn under a bonnet or other fabric covering. Common in the 16th century. Back
  16. At the bottom of NAS, PA2/16, f.9v there is a dark mark on the left of the folio that obscures the contents. Back
  17. Sections of text in NAS, PA2/16, f.10r-v are obscured by blotting. Back
  18. Sic. 'Hay' in 1600/11/8 above. Back
  19. Some this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  20. Some of this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  21. The last 12 lines of NAS PA2/16, f.11r (the following two and a half paragraphs) are obscured by a large blot. Back
  22. 'Alexander' scored out in APS. Back
  23. NAS, PA2/16, f.11v-12r.
    Text of act obscured by large blots.
    Back
  24. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r. Some of text obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  25. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  26. APS interpolation. Back
  27. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r-v. Much of this act is obscured by a blot in the folio. Back
  28. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  29. NAS, PA2/16, f.12v-13v. Back
  30. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  31. Word unclear. Back
  32. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  33. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  34. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  35. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  36. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v-15r. Back
  37. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  38. NAS, PA2/16, f.15r-v. Back
  39. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  40. NAS, PA2/16, f.16r-v. Back
  41. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  42. Possibly Spoutwells, Tayside. Back
  43. Blank spaces denote 2 deleted words, which are illegible. Back
  44. NAS, PA2/16, f.16v-17v. Bottom right hand corner of f.17r. is torn off, and consequently the left hand side of f.17v. Back
  45. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  46. 'and that the' superscript in contemporary hand. Back
  47. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  48. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  49. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  50. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  51. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  52. NAS, PA2/16, f.17v-19r. Back
  53. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  54. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  55. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  56. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  57. Word unclear. Back
  58. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  59. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  60. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  61. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  62. This act is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/68. Back
  63. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Mss returns to usual hand. Back
  64. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  65. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  66. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  67. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  68. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  69. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v-20r. Back
  70. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  71. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r. Back
  72. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  73. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r-v. Back
  74. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  75. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  76. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  77. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  78. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  79. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  80. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  81. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  82. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  83. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  84. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  85. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  86. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  87. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  88. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  89. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  90. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  91. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  92. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  93. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r-v. Back
  94. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v. Back
  95. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  96. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v-22r. Back
  97. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  98. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r. Back
  99. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  100. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r-v. Back
  101. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  102. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v. Back
  103. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  104. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v-23r. Back
  105. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  106. Followed by a partly illegible deleted word, perhaps 'estate'? Back
  107. NAS, PA2/16, f.23r-v. Back
  108. 'P' printed in margin beside heading. Back
  109. NAS, PA2/16, f.23v-24r. Back
  110. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  111. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r. Back
  112. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  113. Uncertain meaning. Back
  114. Defined in DSL as 'The name of a water-fowl, wintering in Orkney and Shetland, and variously described as a variety of the teal, the pochard and the widgeon'. Back
  115. According to DSL, 'Origin and precise application obscure: the name of some (apparently aquatic) bird ... the guillemot or the razorbill, ? from the cries'. Back
  116. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r-v. Back
  117. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  118. NAS, PA2/16, f.24v-25r. Back
  119. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  120. NAS, PA2/16, f.25r-v. Back
  121. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  122. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  123. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  124. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  125. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  126. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, with or without sleeves, usually of leather lined or padded, and in the 16th century sometimes iron-plated or faced with mail. Back
  127. NAS, PA2/16, f.26r-27r. Back
  128. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  129. 'March' crossed out. Back
  130. NAS, PA2/16, f.27r-v. Back
  131. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  132. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v. Back
  133. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  134. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v-28r. Back
  135. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  136. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  137. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  138. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  139. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  140. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v. Back
  141. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  142. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v-29r. Back
  143. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  144. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  145. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  146. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  147. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  148. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  149. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  150. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r-v. Back
  151. 'V' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  152. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v. Back
  153. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  154. NAS, PA2/16, f.29v. Back
  155. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  156. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v-30r. Back
  157. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  158. NAS, PA2/16, f.30r-32r. Back
  159. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  160. The text of this act, not including the title heading, is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/22. Back
  161. NAS, PA2/16, f.32r-34v. Back
  162. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  163. 'portioner' scored out and replaced with 'feu farmer'. Back
  164. Inserted in superscript. Back
  165. Inserted in superscript. Back
  166. Followed by a deleted and illegible word. Back
  167. NAS, PA2/16, f.34v-35r. Back
  168. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  169. 'never' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  170. 'out' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  171. NAS, PA2/16, f.35v - blank folio page. Back
Legislation
The 5 August appointed yearly for solemn thanksgiving in all time coming

Forasmuch as the whole estates of this realm, acknowledging that singular benefit, grace and favour of God bestowed upon them by his miraculous and extraordinary delivery of their most gracious sovereign from the horrible and detestable murder and parricide attempted against his majesty's most noble person by the late John [Ruthven], earl of Gowrie and the late Master Alexander Ruthven, his brother, upon 5 August last, and that it becomes them with most humble and thankful hearts to give unfeigned and daily praise to their merciful God for the safety of every one of themselves and of the whole body of this commonwealth preserved from wrack and utter confusion by the miraculous and bountiful deliverance of his majesty from the said treason in manner foresaid; therefore our sovereign lord, with advice and consent of the whole estates, statutes and ordains that in all times and ages to come 5 August shall yearly be appointed and kept in all the presbyteries and parishes within this realm and bounds of his whole dominions for public preachings, prayers and solemn thanksgiving to God for his great mercy and favour granted to this realm and every member thereof by his majesty's gracious and miraculous preservation as said is upon the said day, and a perpetual monument of their most humble, hearty and unfeigned thanks to God for the same; and that all work, labour and other occupations which may in any sort distract the people from the said godly exercises and thanksgiving yearly upon the day foresaid shall be forborne and abstained from and that all judges, civil and ecclesiastical, shall cause the same to be universally observed, every one of them within the bounds of their own jurisdiction, and see the contraveners thereof punished according to the quality of their transgression.

  1. NAS, PA2/16, f.2r. Back
  2. NAS, PA2/16, f.3r-7r. Back
  3. 'Ditty' written in margin, in contemporary hand. Back
  4. APS interpolation. Back
  5. 'Parthie' in mss. Back
  6. A contemporary comment in the margin refers to the 'ditty' against Alexander Ruthven. Back
  7. APS interpolation. Back
  8. 'Colin' written in superscript above 'Patrick', the latter name having been crossed out. All modifications written in contemporary hand. Back
  9. NAS, PA2/16, f.7r-11v. Back
  10. This must be the battering ram referred to in the second Latin summons at 1600/11/8 above. Back
  11. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, apparently so called because it was designed to be worn concealed under the outer clothes. Back
  12. Defined in DSL as a sleeve consisting of or reinforced by plate-armour. Back
  13. Word unclear. Back
  14. The following last 9 lines of NAS, PA2/16, f.8v are difficult to read due to smudging. Back
  15. Defined in DSL as a kind of close-fitting metal defensive headpiece, a metal skull-cap, commonly worn under a bonnet or other fabric covering. Common in the 16th century. Back
  16. At the bottom of NAS, PA2/16, f.9v there is a dark mark on the left of the folio that obscures the contents. Back
  17. Sections of text in NAS, PA2/16, f.10r-v are obscured by blotting. Back
  18. Sic. 'Hay' in 1600/11/8 above. Back
  19. Some this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  20. Some of this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  21. The last 12 lines of NAS PA2/16, f.11r (the following two and a half paragraphs) are obscured by a large blot. Back
  22. 'Alexander' scored out in APS. Back
  23. NAS, PA2/16, f.11v-12r.
    Text of act obscured by large blots.
    Back
  24. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r. Some of text obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  25. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  26. APS interpolation. Back
  27. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r-v. Much of this act is obscured by a blot in the folio. Back
  28. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  29. NAS, PA2/16, f.12v-13v. Back
  30. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  31. Word unclear. Back
  32. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  33. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  34. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  35. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  36. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v-15r. Back
  37. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  38. NAS, PA2/16, f.15r-v. Back
  39. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  40. NAS, PA2/16, f.16r-v. Back
  41. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  42. Possibly Spoutwells, Tayside. Back
  43. Blank spaces denote 2 deleted words, which are illegible. Back
  44. NAS, PA2/16, f.16v-17v. Bottom right hand corner of f.17r. is torn off, and consequently the left hand side of f.17v. Back
  45. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  46. 'and that the' superscript in contemporary hand. Back
  47. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  48. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  49. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  50. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  51. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  52. NAS, PA2/16, f.17v-19r. Back
  53. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  54. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  55. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  56. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  57. Word unclear. Back
  58. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  59. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  60. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  61. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  62. This act is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/68. Back
  63. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Mss returns to usual hand. Back
  64. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  65. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  66. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  67. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  68. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  69. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v-20r. Back
  70. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  71. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r. Back
  72. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  73. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r-v. Back
  74. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  75. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  76. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  77. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  78. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  79. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  80. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  81. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  82. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  83. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  84. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  85. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  86. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  87. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  88. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  89. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  90. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  91. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  92. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  93. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r-v. Back
  94. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v. Back
  95. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  96. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v-22r. Back
  97. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  98. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r. Back
  99. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  100. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r-v. Back
  101. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  102. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v. Back
  103. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  104. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v-23r. Back
  105. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  106. Followed by a partly illegible deleted word, perhaps 'estate'? Back
  107. NAS, PA2/16, f.23r-v. Back
  108. 'P' printed in margin beside heading. Back
  109. NAS, PA2/16, f.23v-24r. Back
  110. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  111. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r. Back
  112. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  113. Uncertain meaning. Back
  114. Defined in DSL as 'The name of a water-fowl, wintering in Orkney and Shetland, and variously described as a variety of the teal, the pochard and the widgeon'. Back
  115. According to DSL, 'Origin and precise application obscure: the name of some (apparently aquatic) bird ... the guillemot or the razorbill, ? from the cries'. Back
  116. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r-v. Back
  117. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  118. NAS, PA2/16, f.24v-25r. Back
  119. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  120. NAS, PA2/16, f.25r-v. Back
  121. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  122. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  123. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  124. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  125. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  126. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, with or without sleeves, usually of leather lined or padded, and in the 16th century sometimes iron-plated or faced with mail. Back
  127. NAS, PA2/16, f.26r-27r. Back
  128. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  129. 'March' crossed out. Back
  130. NAS, PA2/16, f.27r-v. Back
  131. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  132. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v. Back
  133. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  134. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v-28r. Back
  135. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  136. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  137. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  138. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  139. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  140. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v. Back
  141. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  142. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v-29r. Back
  143. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  144. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  145. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  146. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  147. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  148. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  149. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  150. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r-v. Back
  151. 'V' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  152. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v. Back
  153. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  154. NAS, PA2/16, f.29v. Back
  155. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  156. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v-30r. Back
  157. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  158. NAS, PA2/16, f.30r-32r. Back
  159. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  160. The text of this act, not including the title heading, is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/22. Back
  161. NAS, PA2/16, f.32r-34v. Back
  162. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  163. 'portioner' scored out and replaced with 'feu farmer'. Back
  164. Inserted in superscript. Back
  165. Inserted in superscript. Back
  166. Followed by a deleted and illegible word. Back
  167. NAS, PA2/16, f.34v-35r. Back
  168. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  169. 'never' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  170. 'out' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  171. NAS, PA2/16, f.35v - blank folio page. Back
Act of annexation of the forfeited lands and others to the crown

Forasmuch as it is clearly understood by the king's majesty and estates of this realm that the augmentation of the patrimony and revenues of the crown thereof not only serves for the advancing and maintenance of his highness's honour and royal estate but also relieves greatly his subjects of diverse charges and heavy burdens, therefore our said sovereign lord, following the commendable example of his most noble progenitors, with advice and consent of his majesty's estates, unites, annexes and incorporates to his highness's crown, therewith to remain perpetually and inseparably in all time coming, the lands, lordships, baronies, abbacy and others underwritten which may neither be given in freehold, fee or otherwise, to any person of whatsoever estate or degree without advice, decreet and deliverance of the whole parliament; and for great, reasonable, profitable and seen causes concerning the welfare of the realm, first to be advised and maturely considered by the whole estates; and albeit it shall happen our said sovereign lord that now is, or any of his successor kings of Scotland, to transfer or convey the said lands, lordships, baronies, abbacy or others underwritten with their pertinents, presently annexed to the crown as said is, or any part thereof, that the said alienation shall be null and of no value and that it shall be permissible to the king for the time or his successors to receive the said lands, livings, abbacy and others foresaid with the pertinents to their own use whenever it shall please them without any process of law, and the taker shall refund and pay all profits that they have taken up of the said lands and others foresaid to the king for all the time that they have had them, with such other restrictions as are contained in the acts of parliament made by his majesty and his most noble progenitors, kings of Scotland, in their annexations to the crown and whole former acts of annexation, and all and sundry articles, provisions and restrictions therein contained are held as repeated and specially expressed and comprehended in this present act. These are the names of the lands and others with the pertinents presently annexed to the crown: all and whole the lands, earldom, lordship and barony of Gowrie and Scone; all and whole the lands, lordship and barony of Ruthven, Balerno, Newton, Coulgask, Strathbraan, Glenshee and Trochrie; all and whole the lands, lordships, baronies, teinds, commodities and rents which pertained to the abbacy and monastery of Scone with all and sundry the lands, lordships, baronies, mills, multures, thickets, woods, parks, fishings, towns, villages, burghs of regality or barony, tenements, annualrents, revisions, customs, feu ferms, places, houses, buildings, castles, towers, manor places, outsets, yards, orchards, kirks, teinds, advocation, donation and right of patronage of kirks, hospitals, chaplainries and prebendaries, tenants, tenancies and service of free tenants, profits, emoluments, commodities and pertinents whatsoever of the same lordships, baronies, lands, abbacy, benefices, patronages, teinds and others particularly above-mentioned or any part thereof; all and whole the tenement and lodging in Perth which pertained to the late John [Ruthven], earl of Gowrie, with the yards and other pertinents pertaining thereto, with all and sundry other lands, lordships, baronies, benefices, rents and possessions which either pertained to the said late John, sometime earl of Gowrie, or to his predecessors to whom he was heir or apparent heir or to which in any way he might have succeeded or have had right to or was possessed by him by the space of five years before the committing of the crimes of treason, for the which his memory and posterity is forfeited and declared unable and incapable to hold and possess lands, heritages, benefices, offices or other dignities or commodities within this realm, and now pertaining to our said sovereign lord and being in his highness's hands by reason foresaid. Moreover, our said sovereign lord, with advice foresaid, suppresses and abolishes the regalities and heritable offices pertaining to the said late John, earl of Gowrie or his predecessors or which were annexed to any of the lands, lordships and others foresaid and unites and incorporates the same to his highness's royalty, therewith inseparably to remain in all time coming, and ordains his comptroller present and to come to intromit with, uplift and dispose upon the whole rents, profits and commodities of all and sundry the lordships, baronies, lands, teinds, rents, revenues, profits, commodities and others whatsoever above-specified to his highness's proper use and maintenance of his highness's house and other honourable charges belonging to the said office of the term of [...] and in all time coming. Finally, our said sovereign lord, with advice and consent foresaid, unites all and sundry the lands, lordships, baronies, benefices and others particularly above-mentioned annexed to his highness's crown as said is, to the said lordship of Ruthven, now and in all time coming to be called the lordship and stewartry of Huntingtower, and the tenants, inhabitants and possessors thereof to be answerable to his highness's stewart of the said lordship, united as said is, with such freedoms, privileges and liberties as are in any way competent to any stewartry of his highness's property or to the tenants and indwellers of any of his highness's proper lands within the realm, excepting always and reserving out of this annexation all and whole the third part of the lands and barony of Dirleton, with the tower, fortalice, manor place thereof, Brakeynpark, Highfield, Mensles and Menslesmuire, the town and lands of Dirleton which were apprised by the late Master Adam Otterburn and redeemed by the late Dame Jean Haliburton, with mills, multures, rabbits, rabbit warrens, fishings, as well in salt water as in the fresh, with the advocation and donation of the provostry of Dirleton, with the tenants, tenancies and service of free tenants of all and whole the lands and baronies of Dirleton, with all the pertinents thereof; the third part of the lands and barony of Bolton with mills, multures, tenants, tenancies and service of free tenants of all and whole the said lands and barony of Bolton with the pertinents; the third part of the lands and barony of Hassendean and Haliburton, mills and multures thereof, advocation and donation of the chaplainry of Haliburton, with tenants, tenancies and service of free tenants of all and whole the lands and barony of Haliburton with all the pertinents; all and whole the superiority and tenancies of the half lands and barony of Ballegarno with the pertinents; all and whole the third part of the lands and barony of Abernyte with the mills, multures, mill lands, waulk mills thereof, tenants, tenancies and service of free tenants of the same; all and whole third part of the half lands of Forgandenny with the mills, multures, mill lands, tenants, tenancies and service of free tenants of the said half lands and barony, advocation and donation of the chaplainry of Forgandenny with the pertinents; all and whole the third part of the lands and barony of Seggie with mills, multures, mill lands thereof, tenants, tenancies and service of free tenants of all and whole the lands and barony of Seggie, with all and sundry parts, pendicles and pertinents, annexes and connexes of all and sundry the said lands and others respectively above-written; which lands, baronies and others respectively above-specified are ordained by his majesty and estates to be conveyed heritably to his highness's familiar and domestic servant Sir Thomas Erskine of Gogar, knight, for great, evident and reasonable causes of the realm and are declared in no way to be comprehended under this present annexation nor any clause nor condition thereof. As likewise excepting and reserving out and from the said annexation all and whole the lands and teinds of Cousland with all and sundry their pertinents, which lands and teinds with their whole pertinents are likewise ordained by his majesty and estates to be conveyed heritably to his highness's faithful and trusty servant Sir Hugh Herries, knight, for great, seen, profitable and necessary causes of the realm at length expressed in the said Sir Hugh's infeftment and security of the said lands and teinds granted to him in this present parliament, which are held as specially expressed herein, and also excepting and reserving out of this present annexation the yearly pension of 20 chalders of victual thereof, 10 chalders, 10 bolls of barley, 9 chalders and 6 bolls of meal to be yearly uplifted and taken by the said Sir Hugh Herries, his heirs and assignees out of the best and readiest payment of the whole fruits, rents, mail, ferms, kanes, customs and other duties whatsoever of the lands and lordship of Scone and Gowrie until the infeftment of the lands and barony of Cousland may take full effect by possession in their persons, either by decease of Dame Dorothy Stewart, countess of Gowrie, or by the eviction of the same lands and barony of Cousland from her by the law, and as soon as the said Sir Hugh Herries or his foresaids shall happen to recover or enjoy all and whole the said lands and barony of Cousland and teinds thereof that then the said letter of pension to remain with his highness's crown for ever. As also excepting and reserving out and from this present annexation all and whole the lands of Nether Liff, teinds, feu ferm, arriage, carriage and all other duties and service whatsoever due to be paid out of the same of before to the earls of Gowrie, or to the commendators or convent of Scone or either of them; as also all and whole the town and lands of Durdie Inglis, alias called Nether Durdie, teinds, feu ferms, arriage, carriage and all other duties and service whatsoever due to be paid out of the same of before to the said earls of Gowrie or to the said commendators and convent of Scone or either of them to the effect that his majesty may give and convey the said lands of Nether Liff, teinds, feu ferms, arriage, carriage and all other duties of the same to George Hay of Nether Liff, his heirs and assignees whatsoever heritably or otherwise, and the foresaid town and lands of Durdie Inglis, alias called Nether Durdie, teinds, feu ferms, arriage, carriage and all other duties thereof to Master Peter Hay of Durdie, his heirs and assignees whatsoever heritably or otherwise, in such form and manner as best shall please his majesty. Moreover, his majesty, with advice foresaid, declares and ordains that this present annexation of the lordship and abbacy of Scone to the crown shall in no way be hurtful nor prejudicial to the yearly pension of 10 chalders of victual granted or to be granted by his highness to Master Patrick Galloway forth thereof during all the days of his lifetime according to his gift of pension and special annexation thereof made or to be made to him thereupon, which his highness, with advice and consent foresaid, ratifies and approves in all points and ordains if need be that the same gift be at length inserted in the books of parliament for the said Master Patrick's better security, declaring that the said annexation shall not be effectual but shall be suspended enduring the lifetime of the said Master Patrick in so far as concerns the said teinds conveyed or to be conveyed to him in manner foresaid. Only and also excepting and reserving out of this present annexation of the earldom and living of Gowrie to his highness's crown, all and whole the lands of Craigton with the teinds thereof and the teind sheaves of the lands and town of Goukton, Rybnes, Seggieden, Pitfendy, Nether Kinfauns, Over Kinfauns, The Binn and Tullyhow, with their pertinents, lying within the parish of Kinfauns, the teind fish of the fishings of Craigton, Inchyra, Fleiplace, Stobribnodeip, the Cruik and all other teind fishing pertaining to the abbey of Scone from the wood of Kinnoull to Inchyra to the effect that our sovereign lord may give and convey the same to John Lindsay, alias Charteris, eldest son and apparent heir to Harry Lindsay, alias Charteris, fiar of Kinfauns, his heirs and assignees, to be held of his highness according to the condition and manner of holding as the same was held of before of the earls of Gowrie or abbots of Scone and for the same self duty which the said lands and teinds were in use to pay to the earls of Gowrie or abbots of Scone before the making of this present act.

  1. NAS, PA2/16, f.2r. Back
  2. NAS, PA2/16, f.3r-7r. Back
  3. 'Ditty' written in margin, in contemporary hand. Back
  4. APS interpolation. Back
  5. 'Parthie' in mss. Back
  6. A contemporary comment in the margin refers to the 'ditty' against Alexander Ruthven. Back
  7. APS interpolation. Back
  8. 'Colin' written in superscript above 'Patrick', the latter name having been crossed out. All modifications written in contemporary hand. Back
  9. NAS, PA2/16, f.7r-11v. Back
  10. This must be the battering ram referred to in the second Latin summons at 1600/11/8 above. Back
  11. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, apparently so called because it was designed to be worn concealed under the outer clothes. Back
  12. Defined in DSL as a sleeve consisting of or reinforced by plate-armour. Back
  13. Word unclear. Back
  14. The following last 9 lines of NAS, PA2/16, f.8v are difficult to read due to smudging. Back
  15. Defined in DSL as a kind of close-fitting metal defensive headpiece, a metal skull-cap, commonly worn under a bonnet or other fabric covering. Common in the 16th century. Back
  16. At the bottom of NAS, PA2/16, f.9v there is a dark mark on the left of the folio that obscures the contents. Back
  17. Sections of text in NAS, PA2/16, f.10r-v are obscured by blotting. Back
  18. Sic. 'Hay' in 1600/11/8 above. Back
  19. Some this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  20. Some of this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  21. The last 12 lines of NAS PA2/16, f.11r (the following two and a half paragraphs) are obscured by a large blot. Back
  22. 'Alexander' scored out in APS. Back
  23. NAS, PA2/16, f.11v-12r.
    Text of act obscured by large blots.
    Back
  24. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r. Some of text obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  25. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  26. APS interpolation. Back
  27. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r-v. Much of this act is obscured by a blot in the folio. Back
  28. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  29. NAS, PA2/16, f.12v-13v. Back
  30. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  31. Word unclear. Back
  32. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  33. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  34. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  35. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  36. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v-15r. Back
  37. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  38. NAS, PA2/16, f.15r-v. Back
  39. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  40. NAS, PA2/16, f.16r-v. Back
  41. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  42. Possibly Spoutwells, Tayside. Back
  43. Blank spaces denote 2 deleted words, which are illegible. Back
  44. NAS, PA2/16, f.16v-17v. Bottom right hand corner of f.17r. is torn off, and consequently the left hand side of f.17v. Back
  45. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  46. 'and that the' superscript in contemporary hand. Back
  47. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  48. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  49. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  50. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  51. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  52. NAS, PA2/16, f.17v-19r. Back
  53. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  54. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  55. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  56. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  57. Word unclear. Back
  58. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  59. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  60. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  61. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  62. This act is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/68. Back
  63. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Mss returns to usual hand. Back
  64. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  65. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  66. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  67. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  68. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  69. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v-20r. Back
  70. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  71. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r. Back
  72. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  73. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r-v. Back
  74. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  75. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  76. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  77. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  78. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  79. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  80. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  81. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  82. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  83. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  84. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  85. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  86. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  87. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  88. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  89. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  90. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  91. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  92. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  93. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r-v. Back
  94. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v. Back
  95. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  96. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v-22r. Back
  97. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  98. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r. Back
  99. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  100. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r-v. Back
  101. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  102. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v. Back
  103. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  104. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v-23r. Back
  105. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  106. Followed by a partly illegible deleted word, perhaps 'estate'? Back
  107. NAS, PA2/16, f.23r-v. Back
  108. 'P' printed in margin beside heading. Back
  109. NAS, PA2/16, f.23v-24r. Back
  110. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  111. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r. Back
  112. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  113. Uncertain meaning. Back
  114. Defined in DSL as 'The name of a water-fowl, wintering in Orkney and Shetland, and variously described as a variety of the teal, the pochard and the widgeon'. Back
  115. According to DSL, 'Origin and precise application obscure: the name of some (apparently aquatic) bird ... the guillemot or the razorbill, ? from the cries'. Back
  116. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r-v. Back
  117. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  118. NAS, PA2/16, f.24v-25r. Back
  119. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  120. NAS, PA2/16, f.25r-v. Back
  121. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  122. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  123. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  124. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  125. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  126. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, with or without sleeves, usually of leather lined or padded, and in the 16th century sometimes iron-plated or faced with mail. Back
  127. NAS, PA2/16, f.26r-27r. Back
  128. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  129. 'March' crossed out. Back
  130. NAS, PA2/16, f.27r-v. Back
  131. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  132. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v. Back
  133. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  134. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v-28r. Back
  135. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  136. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  137. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  138. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  139. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  140. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v. Back
  141. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  142. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v-29r. Back
  143. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  144. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  145. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  146. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  147. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  148. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  149. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  150. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r-v. Back
  151. 'V' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  152. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v. Back
  153. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  154. NAS, PA2/16, f.29v. Back
  155. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  156. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v-30r. Back
  157. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  158. NAS, PA2/16, f.30r-32r. Back
  159. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  160. The text of this act, not including the title heading, is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/22. Back
  161. NAS, PA2/16, f.32r-34v. Back
  162. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  163. 'portioner' scored out and replaced with 'feu farmer'. Back
  164. Inserted in superscript. Back
  165. Inserted in superscript. Back
  166. Followed by a deleted and illegible word. Back
  167. NAS, PA2/16, f.34v-35r. Back
  168. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  169. 'never' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  170. 'out' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  171. NAS, PA2/16, f.35v - blank folio page. Back
Procedure: protests
Protestation for the queen's majesty

The which day Alexander Seton, lord Fyvie, president of the college of justice, protested in name and on behalf of the queen's majesty that the foresaid exception contained in the act of annexation made in favour of Sir Hugh Herries, knight, regarding the teinds of the lands of Cousland, be in no way prejudicial to her majesty nor to any right which she has or may have in and to the same teinds pertaining to the lordship of Dunfermline, and also that the infeftment or right made in this present parliament or to be made hereafter to the said Sir Hugh of the said teinds of Cousland be not prejudicial to her majesty and to her right of the same teinds; the which protestation the whole estates of parliament granted and admitted.

  1. NAS, PA2/16, f.2r. Back
  2. NAS, PA2/16, f.3r-7r. Back
  3. 'Ditty' written in margin, in contemporary hand. Back
  4. APS interpolation. Back
  5. 'Parthie' in mss. Back
  6. A contemporary comment in the margin refers to the 'ditty' against Alexander Ruthven. Back
  7. APS interpolation. Back
  8. 'Colin' written in superscript above 'Patrick', the latter name having been crossed out. All modifications written in contemporary hand. Back
  9. NAS, PA2/16, f.7r-11v. Back
  10. This must be the battering ram referred to in the second Latin summons at 1600/11/8 above. Back
  11. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, apparently so called because it was designed to be worn concealed under the outer clothes. Back
  12. Defined in DSL as a sleeve consisting of or reinforced by plate-armour. Back
  13. Word unclear. Back
  14. The following last 9 lines of NAS, PA2/16, f.8v are difficult to read due to smudging. Back
  15. Defined in DSL as a kind of close-fitting metal defensive headpiece, a metal skull-cap, commonly worn under a bonnet or other fabric covering. Common in the 16th century. Back
  16. At the bottom of NAS, PA2/16, f.9v there is a dark mark on the left of the folio that obscures the contents. Back
  17. Sections of text in NAS, PA2/16, f.10r-v are obscured by blotting. Back
  18. Sic. 'Hay' in 1600/11/8 above. Back
  19. Some this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  20. Some of this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  21. The last 12 lines of NAS PA2/16, f.11r (the following two and a half paragraphs) are obscured by a large blot. Back
  22. 'Alexander' scored out in APS. Back
  23. NAS, PA2/16, f.11v-12r.
    Text of act obscured by large blots.
    Back
  24. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r. Some of text obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  25. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  26. APS interpolation. Back
  27. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r-v. Much of this act is obscured by a blot in the folio. Back
  28. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  29. NAS, PA2/16, f.12v-13v. Back
  30. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  31. Word unclear. Back
  32. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  33. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  34. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  35. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  36. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v-15r. Back
  37. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  38. NAS, PA2/16, f.15r-v. Back
  39. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  40. NAS, PA2/16, f.16r-v. Back
  41. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  42. Possibly Spoutwells, Tayside. Back
  43. Blank spaces denote 2 deleted words, which are illegible. Back
  44. NAS, PA2/16, f.16v-17v. Bottom right hand corner of f.17r. is torn off, and consequently the left hand side of f.17v. Back
  45. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  46. 'and that the' superscript in contemporary hand. Back
  47. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  48. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  49. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  50. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  51. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  52. NAS, PA2/16, f.17v-19r. Back
  53. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  54. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  55. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  56. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  57. Word unclear. Back
  58. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  59. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  60. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  61. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  62. This act is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/68. Back
  63. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Mss returns to usual hand. Back
  64. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  65. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  66. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  67. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  68. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  69. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v-20r. Back
  70. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  71. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r. Back
  72. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  73. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r-v. Back
  74. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  75. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  76. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  77. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  78. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  79. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  80. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  81. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  82. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  83. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  84. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  85. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  86. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  87. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  88. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  89. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  90. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  91. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  92. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  93. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r-v. Back
  94. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v. Back
  95. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  96. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v-22r. Back
  97. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  98. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r. Back
  99. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  100. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r-v. Back
  101. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  102. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v. Back
  103. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  104. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v-23r. Back
  105. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  106. Followed by a partly illegible deleted word, perhaps 'estate'? Back
  107. NAS, PA2/16, f.23r-v. Back
  108. 'P' printed in margin beside heading. Back
  109. NAS, PA2/16, f.23v-24r. Back
  110. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  111. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r. Back
  112. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  113. Uncertain meaning. Back
  114. Defined in DSL as 'The name of a water-fowl, wintering in Orkney and Shetland, and variously described as a variety of the teal, the pochard and the widgeon'. Back
  115. According to DSL, 'Origin and precise application obscure: the name of some (apparently aquatic) bird ... the guillemot or the razorbill, ? from the cries'. Back
  116. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r-v. Back
  117. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  118. NAS, PA2/16, f.24v-25r. Back
  119. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  120. NAS, PA2/16, f.25r-v. Back
  121. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  122. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  123. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  124. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  125. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  126. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, with or without sleeves, usually of leather lined or padded, and in the 16th century sometimes iron-plated or faced with mail. Back
  127. NAS, PA2/16, f.26r-27r. Back
  128. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  129. 'March' crossed out. Back
  130. NAS, PA2/16, f.27r-v. Back
  131. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  132. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v. Back
  133. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  134. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v-28r. Back
  135. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  136. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  137. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  138. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  139. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  140. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v. Back
  141. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  142. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v-29r. Back
  143. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  144. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  145. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  146. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  147. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  148. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  149. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  150. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r-v. Back
  151. 'V' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  152. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v. Back
  153. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  154. NAS, PA2/16, f.29v. Back
  155. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  156. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v-30r. Back
  157. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  158. NAS, PA2/16, f.30r-32r. Back
  159. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  160. The text of this act, not including the title heading, is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/22. Back
  161. NAS, PA2/16, f.32r-34v. Back
  162. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  163. 'portioner' scored out and replaced with 'feu farmer'. Back
  164. Inserted in superscript. Back
  165. Inserted in superscript. Back
  166. Followed by a deleted and illegible word. Back
  167. NAS, PA2/16, f.34v-35r. Back
  168. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  169. 'never' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  170. 'out' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  171. NAS, PA2/16, f.35v - blank folio page. Back
Protestation for [Andrew Leslie], earl of Rothes

The which day, in presence of our sovereign lord and estates of parliament, compeared Masters John Sharp and Robert Learmonth, procurators for a right noble and mighty earl, Andrew, earl of Rothes, lord Leslie, and produced an acquittance and discharge made to him and the late Dame Jean Ruthven, his spouse, by the late William [Ruthven], lord Ruthven, as tutor testamentar to the late Henry [Stewart], lord Methven, by the which the said late William, lord Ruthven, as tutor testamentar foresaid, granted him to have received from the said noble earl and his said spouse the heirship goods pertaining to the said late Henry, lord Methven, which are particularly specified in the foresaid discharge, and further granted him as tutor testamentar foresaid to have received full and complete payment and deliverance from the said noble earl of all other goods and gear intromitted with by him and his said late spouse which in any way pertained to the said late Lord Methven, and exonerated and discharged them thereof and also bound and obliged him, his heirs and successors to warrant and keep them undamaged of the same at all hands, as in the said acquittance and discharge bearing the foresaid obligation of warrandice of the date at Methven, 18 January 1574 [1575], which the said procurators procured in judgement, at more length is contained, and protested that the process and doom of forfeiture led and given against John [Ruthven], sometime earl of Gowrie, heir by progress and successor to the said late William, lord Ruthven should in no way hurt the said Andrew, earl of Rothes, his heirs and successors regarding the said acquittance and discharge but that he, his heirs and successors might be relieved of the said heirship goods and other goods contained therein at the hands of the heirs and successors of the said late Henry, lord Methven by reason of the deliverance of the same made by the said Andrew, earl of Rothes to the said late William, lord Ruthven, tutor testamentar foresaid, who at that time justly might have received the same being tutor testamentar as said is; which protestation our said sovereign lord and his said estates in parliament have admitted and admit according to the law.

  1. NAS, PA2/16, f.2r. Back
  2. NAS, PA2/16, f.3r-7r. Back
  3. 'Ditty' written in margin, in contemporary hand. Back
  4. APS interpolation. Back
  5. 'Parthie' in mss. Back
  6. A contemporary comment in the margin refers to the 'ditty' against Alexander Ruthven. Back
  7. APS interpolation. Back
  8. 'Colin' written in superscript above 'Patrick', the latter name having been crossed out. All modifications written in contemporary hand. Back
  9. NAS, PA2/16, f.7r-11v. Back
  10. This must be the battering ram referred to in the second Latin summons at 1600/11/8 above. Back
  11. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, apparently so called because it was designed to be worn concealed under the outer clothes. Back
  12. Defined in DSL as a sleeve consisting of or reinforced by plate-armour. Back
  13. Word unclear. Back
  14. The following last 9 lines of NAS, PA2/16, f.8v are difficult to read due to smudging. Back
  15. Defined in DSL as a kind of close-fitting metal defensive headpiece, a metal skull-cap, commonly worn under a bonnet or other fabric covering. Common in the 16th century. Back
  16. At the bottom of NAS, PA2/16, f.9v there is a dark mark on the left of the folio that obscures the contents. Back
  17. Sections of text in NAS, PA2/16, f.10r-v are obscured by blotting. Back
  18. Sic. 'Hay' in 1600/11/8 above. Back
  19. Some this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  20. Some of this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  21. The last 12 lines of NAS PA2/16, f.11r (the following two and a half paragraphs) are obscured by a large blot. Back
  22. 'Alexander' scored out in APS. Back
  23. NAS, PA2/16, f.11v-12r.
    Text of act obscured by large blots.
    Back
  24. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r. Some of text obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  25. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  26. APS interpolation. Back
  27. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r-v. Much of this act is obscured by a blot in the folio. Back
  28. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  29. NAS, PA2/16, f.12v-13v. Back
  30. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  31. Word unclear. Back
  32. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  33. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  34. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  35. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  36. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v-15r. Back
  37. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  38. NAS, PA2/16, f.15r-v. Back
  39. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  40. NAS, PA2/16, f.16r-v. Back
  41. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  42. Possibly Spoutwells, Tayside. Back
  43. Blank spaces denote 2 deleted words, which are illegible. Back
  44. NAS, PA2/16, f.16v-17v. Bottom right hand corner of f.17r. is torn off, and consequently the left hand side of f.17v. Back
  45. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  46. 'and that the' superscript in contemporary hand. Back
  47. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  48. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  49. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  50. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  51. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  52. NAS, PA2/16, f.17v-19r. Back
  53. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  54. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  55. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  56. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  57. Word unclear. Back
  58. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  59. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  60. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  61. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  62. This act is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/68. Back
  63. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Mss returns to usual hand. Back
  64. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  65. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  66. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  67. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  68. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  69. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v-20r. Back
  70. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  71. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r. Back
  72. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  73. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r-v. Back
  74. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  75. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  76. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  77. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  78. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  79. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  80. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  81. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  82. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  83. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  84. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  85. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  86. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  87. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  88. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  89. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  90. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  91. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  92. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  93. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r-v. Back
  94. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v. Back
  95. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  96. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v-22r. Back
  97. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  98. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r. Back
  99. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  100. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r-v. Back
  101. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  102. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v. Back
  103. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  104. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v-23r. Back
  105. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  106. Followed by a partly illegible deleted word, perhaps 'estate'? Back
  107. NAS, PA2/16, f.23r-v. Back
  108. 'P' printed in margin beside heading. Back
  109. NAS, PA2/16, f.23v-24r. Back
  110. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  111. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r. Back
  112. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  113. Uncertain meaning. Back
  114. Defined in DSL as 'The name of a water-fowl, wintering in Orkney and Shetland, and variously described as a variety of the teal, the pochard and the widgeon'. Back
  115. According to DSL, 'Origin and precise application obscure: the name of some (apparently aquatic) bird ... the guillemot or the razorbill, ? from the cries'. Back
  116. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r-v. Back
  117. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  118. NAS, PA2/16, f.24v-25r. Back
  119. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  120. NAS, PA2/16, f.25r-v. Back
  121. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  122. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  123. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  124. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  125. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  126. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, with or without sleeves, usually of leather lined or padded, and in the 16th century sometimes iron-plated or faced with mail. Back
  127. NAS, PA2/16, f.26r-27r. Back
  128. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  129. 'March' crossed out. Back
  130. NAS, PA2/16, f.27r-v. Back
  131. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  132. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v. Back
  133. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  134. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v-28r. Back
  135. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  136. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  137. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  138. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  139. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  140. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v. Back
  141. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  142. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v-29r. Back
  143. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  144. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  145. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  146. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  147. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  148. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  149. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  150. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r-v. Back
  151. 'V' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  152. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v. Back
  153. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  154. NAS, PA2/16, f.29v. Back
  155. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  156. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v-30r. Back
  157. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  158. NAS, PA2/16, f.30r-32r. Back
  159. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  160. The text of this act, not including the title heading, is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/22. Back
  161. NAS, PA2/16, f.32r-34v. Back
  162. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  163. 'portioner' scored out and replaced with 'feu farmer'. Back
  164. Inserted in superscript. Back
  165. Inserted in superscript. Back
  166. Followed by a deleted and illegible word. Back
  167. NAS, PA2/16, f.34v-35r. Back
  168. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  169. 'never' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  170. 'out' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  171. NAS, PA2/16, f.35v - blank folio page. Back
Legislation: private acts
Act in favour of Sir Thomas Erskine [of Gogar]

Our sovereign lord, with advice of the estates of his highness's realm convened in this present parliament, calling to remembrance the long, true and thankful service done to his majesty by the late Alexander Erskine of Gogar, master of Mar, in the education and preservation of his majesty's most noble person from his infancy and tender age, with his earnest care, foresight and diligence to prevent all perils and dangers which might in any way appear to touch his majesty's person, honour or estate during the keeping and custody of his highness's person committed to his charge, and also his continual perseverance in his sincere affection towards his majesty's service during all the days of his lifetime; and therewithal considering the most loyal and faithful service continued by his familiar and domestic servant, Sir Thomas Erskine of Gogar, knight, gentleman of his highness's chamber and captain of his highness's guard and eldest lawful son to the said late Master of Mar, towards his majesty at all times, both before his said late father's decease and continually since, and specially the worthiness of the late notable service done to his majesty by the said Sir Thomas upon 5 August last at Perth within the great lodging of the late John [Ruthven], sometime earl of Gowrie, in the resisting of the unnatural, ungodly and abominable treason and conspiracy attempted by the said late earl and the late Master Alexander Ruthven, his brother, against his majesty's most noble person, he being for the time secretly and treasonably convoyed by the said late Master Alexander Ruthven to a turret of the said lodging, of set purpose and intention there to have murdered and bereft his majesty of his life; and being then destitute of all his servants and standing courageously in the meantime upon the defence of his own life, the said Sir Thomas came to his majesty's rescue and relief and exposed his own life to most evident peril and danger of death to the great effusion of his blood, shed by the said traitors and their accomplices in the defence of his majesty's person and by the providence of God assisted his highness most valiantly and courageously in the preserving of his highness's person out of their bloody hands. And seeing it has pleased God to honour the said Sir Thomas with this dignity by his prowess, manhood and virtue to be one of the chief instruments of the preservation and delivery of his majesty's most royal person, to his great praise and perpetual commendation, and that thereby his majesty's nobles and whole estates of his highness's realm have reported so rare and singular a benefit of the safety and continuance of their natural prince and sovereign to reign over them in justice and equity to the great glory of God, tranquillity of this realm and universal comfort and solace of the whole people, which being great, evident and reasonable causes of the realm and being duly and sufficiently verified and proven before the lords of the articles and whole estates of this present parliament, therefore his majesty, moved of his princely honour and conscience to be mindful of the said most worthy and acceptable service and to gratify the said Sir Thomas with some honourable reward thereof to encourage him to persevere in his sincere affection towards his majesty's service and to steer and provoke all other good subjects by his good and laudable example to be followers of his virtue and courage in their dutiful obedience and service to his majesty's and his successors' careful preservation and defence of their lives and honours according to their bound duty, with consent and authority of this present parliament, ordains an infeftment to be made under his great seal in due form giving, granting and conveying to the said Sir Thomas, his heirs and assignees heritably all and whole the third part of the lands and barony of Dirleton, with the castle, tower, fortalice, manor place, houses, buildings, yards, orchards, dovecots, woods, parks thereof, Braikin Park, Highfield, Mensles and Mensles Mure, with the lands of the town of Dirleton which were comprised by the late Master Adam Otterburn and were lawfully redeemed by the late Dame Jean Haliburton, with mills, mill lands, multures, links, rabbits, rabbit warrens, fishings in salt water and fresh, together with the advocation and donation of the provostry of Dirleton, with tenants, tenancies, service of free tenants of all and whole the lands, lordship and barony of Dirleton with all other parts, pendicles, annexes, connexes and pertinents thereof, lying within the sheriffdom of Edinburgh and constabulary of Haddington; all and whole the third part of the lands of Bolton, with mill, multures, tenants, tenancies, service of free tenants thereof and all their pertinents, lying within the constabulary and sheriffdom foresaid; all and whole the third part of the lands of Hassendean and Haliburton, with mills, mill lands thereof, advocation and donation of the chaplainry of Haliburton, with tenants, tenancies, service of free tenants of all and sundry the lands foresaid with their pertinents, lying within the sheriffdom of Berwick; all and whole the superiority and tenancy of the half lands and barony of Ballegarno with the pertinents, with tenants, tenancies and service of free tenants of the said half lands and barony; all and whole the third part of all and whole the lands and barony of Abernyte, with the mills, multures, mill lands, waulk mills thereof, tenants, tenancies and service of free tenants of the same; all and whole the third part of the lands and barony of Forgandenny, with the mills, multures, mill lands, tenants, tenancies and service of free tenants of the said half lands and barony, advocation and donation of the chaplainry of Forgandenny, all lying within the sheriffdom of Perth; all and whole the third part of the lands and barony of Seggie, with the mills, multures, mill lands thereof, tenants, tenancies and service of free tenants of the same lands and barony with all and sundry parts, pendicles, annexes, connexes, outsets and pertinents thereof, lying within the sheriffdom of Kinross; which lands, baronies and others respectively above-specified with their pertinents pertained to the said late John, sometime earl of Gowrie, heritably, at the least the said late John had right to succeed thereto as apparent heir to the late James [Ruthven], earl of Gowrie, his brother, or the late William [Ruthven], earl of Gowrie, his father, who was heritably infeft and seised in the same. And now the said lands, baronies and others respectively foresaid pertain to our said sovereign lord, fallen and become in his highness's hands and at his highness's gift and disposition of escheat through the process and doom of forfeiture orderly led and deduced against the said late John, sometime earl of Gowrie, and the said late Master Alexander Ruthven, his brother, for certain crimes of treason and lese-majesty committed by them of the which they were convicted in this present parliament, as the said process and sense of forfeiture pronounced against them at more length bears, or by virtue of whatsoever other right, cause or occasion that the same lands, baronies and others particularly above-mentioned may fall and become in his highness's hands. And for the said Sir Thomas and his foresaids better security, giving and conveying to them the escheat of all and whatsoever reversions, bonds, contracts, obligations or promises for making of reversions made and granted by whatsoever person or persons to the said late John, sometime earl of Gowrie, or any of his predecessors for redemption of the said lands, baronies and others respectively foresaid, with their pertinents or any part thereof, with all other rights, titles, contracts, bonds and obligations made and conceived in favour of the said late John, sometime earl of Gowrie, or any other of his predecessors or in favour of the said late Master Alexander Ruthven, his brother, whereby the property and possession of the said lands, baronies and others respectively above-specified, with their pertinents or any part thereof, might have returned and pertained to them or either of them or whereby they or either of them might have claimed or recovered any right, title, property or possession of the same lands, baronies and others foresaid or any part thereof now pertaining likewise to our said sovereign lord and at his highness's gift and disposition by reason of escheat through the process and doom of forfeiture foresaid orderly led and deduced against the said late John, sometime earl of Gowrie, and the said late Master Alexander, his brother, as said is, with full power to the said Sir Thomas and his foresaids to call and pursue the possessors of the said reversions, contracts, bonds, obligations, rights and securities for the delivery of the same to them and to use all necessary execution thereupon for fulfilling of the same to them and to redeem and outquit the lands and others above-specified by virtue of the said revisions according to the tenor of the same and to do, use and exercise all other things necessary for recovering and obtaining of the right and possession of the said lands, baronies and others respectively foresaid and every part thereof also and as freely in all respects as the said sometime earl or any of his predecessors or the said late Master Alexander or any of them might have done themselves by virtue of the same reversions, rights and evidents; and also renouncing and transferring for his highness and his successors all right, title, interest, claim of right, both property and possession, which his highness or his successors may claim, have or pretend in and to the said lands, baronies and others respectively above-specified or any part of the same by reason of ward, relief, non-entries, recognitions, forfeiture, bastardry, purpresture, disclamation or for whatsoever other cause or occasion present, bygone or to come to the said Sir Thomas, his heirs and assignees heritably for now and ever with a supplement of all the defaults and with an agreement not to appeal; and for the said Sir Thomas's better security of all and whole the said lands, lordship and barony of Dirleton and others foresaid principally conveyed to him as said is and in special clause of warrandice thereof, giving, granting and conveying to the said Sir Thomas, his heirs and assignees all and whole the lands, baronies, mills, mill lands and others after-specified of the lordship of Stirlingshire, with the whole mails, ferms, profits, commodities, customs, grassums and other casualties and duties whatsoever pertaining to his majesty as a part of his property, namely: all and sundry the lands and baronies of Tillicoultry, with the towers, fortalices, manor places, houses, buildings, yards, orchards, mills, multures, fishings, mails, feu ferms, kanes, customs, tenants, tenancies and service of free tenants thereof and their pertinents, lying within the sheriffdom of Clackmannan; and all and sundry the lands of Cornton; all and sundry the lands of Bothkennar, the lands of Manner, the lands of Powhouse, the lands of Logie, the lands of Blairlogie, the lands of Skeoch, alias Blairgib, the mill of Skeoch, the lands of Greenyards, the lands of Walkershill and Walkmyln respectively, with towers, fortalices, manor places, houses, buildings, yards, orchards, mills, multures, fishings, mails, feu ferms, kanes, customs, casualties, grassums, rents and duties thereof, tenants, tenancies and service of free tenants of the same and all their pertinents lying within the said lordship of Stirling and sheriffdom thereof and that in special warrandice of the lands, baronies and others respectively above-specified principally conveyed as said is, so that if it shall happen the said Sir Thomas or his foresaids to be deprived, molested or troubled in the peaceable possessing and enjoying thereof or in the intromitting and uplifting of the mails, ferms, profits and duties of the same or any part thereof or the same to be evicted from them, in that case it shall be permissible to the said Sir Thomas and his foresaids to have full and free regress and ingress in and to the property and possession of the said lands and lordship of Stirlingshire, whole mails, ferms, kanes, customs, profits, casualties and other duties whatsoever belonging thereto. And to the effect that the said infeftment of warrandice of the said lands and lordship of Stirlingshire may be good, valid and effectual in the self to the said Sir Thomas, his heirs and assignees in all time coming, his majesty, of his own proper motive and certain knowledge, with consent and authority of this present parliament, in respect of the said great, evident and reasonable causes moving his majesty to the granting hereof, allowed and approved by his highness's estates as said is, has dissolved and by this act dissolves all and whole the said lands and lordship of Stirlingshire from all annexations thereof to the crown made by his highness or any of his predecessors to the effect the same may be conveyed in free blench ferm in manner above-written to the said Sir Thomas, his heirs and assignees in special security and warrandice of the said lands and barony of Dirleton and others foresaid principally conveyed to him as said is; and also the same infeftment shall contain an union of all and whole the said lands and barony of Dirleton and others respectively above-specified conveyed principally as said is and erection thereof in a free barony, to be called in all time coming the barony of Dirleton, and that a sasine to be taken at the place and castle of Dirleton shall be sufficient to the said Sir Thomas, his heirs and assignees for all the particular lands above-mentioned together with an union of all and sundry the said lands and baronies of the lordship of Stirlingshire conveyed to him in clause of warrandice as said is and erection thereof in a free barony, to be called the barony of [...], and that a sasine to be taken upon the ground of the lands of [...] shall be a sufficient sasine to the said Sir Thomas, his heirs and assignees for all and sundry the said particular lands of the said lordship of Stirlingshire, notwithstanding that the same lands lies apart from all the said lands and others respectively foresaid principal and warrandice to be held of our said sovereign lord and his successors in free heritage, free blench ferm and free barony forever with all privileges and liberties pertaining to free baronies in most ample form, for yearly payment for that to our sovereign lord and his successors of a silver penny at the feast of Whitsunday [May/June] in name of blench ferm if it be asked only. And that the said infeftment be completed in due form with extension of all clauses needful, ordaining his highness's great seal and the seals of the lords of his parliament to be appended thereto, which infeftment, with the sasine to follow thereupon, his majesty, with advice and consent foresaid, now as if the same were made and granted and then as now, ratifies and approves in all heads, clauses, articles, provisions and conditions thereof and finds and declares that the changing of the old holding of the said lands and barony of Dirleton and others respectively above-mentioned principally conveyed as said is from ward to blench, together with the disposition of the said lands and baronies of the lordship of Stirlingshire in warrandice thereof to be held in like manner by him in free blench ferm as said is, is well and lawfully done by his majesty with the mature deliberation and advice of the estates of parliament for the great, evident and reasonable cause to the realm, and that the same is and shall be in all time coming good, valid and effectual rights to the said Sir Thomas, his heirs and assignees for possessing and enjoying of the said lands and baronies both principal and warrandice in free blench, notwithstanding that the said lands and barony of Dirleton and others respectively above-specified principally conveyed as said is were held by service of ward and relief of before, and notwithstanding that the said land and lordship of Stirlingshire was his highness's annexed property, and notwithstanding of whatsoever acts of annexation thereof to the crown made by his highness or his predecessors, any clause or condition thereof, or of whatsoever others acts, laws or constitutions made or to be made in the contrary, forbidding the changing of ward held in blench and all kind of disposition of the king's property otherwise than in feu ferm and with augmentation of the rental or disposition in feu of the feu ferms; with the which acts and every one of them, and all others which may in any way prejudice or derogate the said infeftment holding therein contained, both of the principal and warrandice, or any other clauses, liberties, privileges, provisions and conditions specified therein, his majesty and estates foresaid expressly dispense and makes full derogation to the same in so far as they may be extended in any way to the said lands and baronies, both principal and warrandice, to the effect the said Sir Thomas, his heirs and assignees may peaceably hold, enjoy and possess all and whole the said lands, baronies and others respectively above-mentioned after the form and tenor of his said infeftment to be made to him thereupon without any revocation, contradiction or recalling whatsoever.

  1. NAS, PA2/16, f.2r. Back
  2. NAS, PA2/16, f.3r-7r. Back
  3. 'Ditty' written in margin, in contemporary hand. Back
  4. APS interpolation. Back
  5. 'Parthie' in mss. Back
  6. A contemporary comment in the margin refers to the 'ditty' against Alexander Ruthven. Back
  7. APS interpolation. Back
  8. 'Colin' written in superscript above 'Patrick', the latter name having been crossed out. All modifications written in contemporary hand. Back
  9. NAS, PA2/16, f.7r-11v. Back
  10. This must be the battering ram referred to in the second Latin summons at 1600/11/8 above. Back
  11. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, apparently so called because it was designed to be worn concealed under the outer clothes. Back
  12. Defined in DSL as a sleeve consisting of or reinforced by plate-armour. Back
  13. Word unclear. Back
  14. The following last 9 lines of NAS, PA2/16, f.8v are difficult to read due to smudging. Back
  15. Defined in DSL as a kind of close-fitting metal defensive headpiece, a metal skull-cap, commonly worn under a bonnet or other fabric covering. Common in the 16th century. Back
  16. At the bottom of NAS, PA2/16, f.9v there is a dark mark on the left of the folio that obscures the contents. Back
  17. Sections of text in NAS, PA2/16, f.10r-v are obscured by blotting. Back
  18. Sic. 'Hay' in 1600/11/8 above. Back
  19. Some this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  20. Some of this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  21. The last 12 lines of NAS PA2/16, f.11r (the following two and a half paragraphs) are obscured by a large blot. Back
  22. 'Alexander' scored out in APS. Back
  23. NAS, PA2/16, f.11v-12r.
    Text of act obscured by large blots.
    Back
  24. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r. Some of text obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  25. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  26. APS interpolation. Back
  27. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r-v. Much of this act is obscured by a blot in the folio. Back
  28. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  29. NAS, PA2/16, f.12v-13v. Back
  30. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  31. Word unclear. Back
  32. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  33. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  34. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  35. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  36. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v-15r. Back
  37. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  38. NAS, PA2/16, f.15r-v. Back
  39. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  40. NAS, PA2/16, f.16r-v. Back
  41. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  42. Possibly Spoutwells, Tayside. Back
  43. Blank spaces denote 2 deleted words, which are illegible. Back
  44. NAS, PA2/16, f.16v-17v. Bottom right hand corner of f.17r. is torn off, and consequently the left hand side of f.17v. Back
  45. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  46. 'and that the' superscript in contemporary hand. Back
  47. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  48. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  49. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  50. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  51. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  52. NAS, PA2/16, f.17v-19r. Back
  53. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  54. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  55. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  56. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  57. Word unclear. Back
  58. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  59. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  60. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  61. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  62. This act is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/68. Back
  63. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Mss returns to usual hand. Back
  64. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  65. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  66. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  67. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  68. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  69. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v-20r. Back
  70. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  71. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r. Back
  72. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  73. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r-v. Back
  74. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  75. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  76. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  77. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  78. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  79. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  80. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  81. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  82. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  83. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  84. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  85. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  86. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  87. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  88. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  89. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  90. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  91. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  92. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  93. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r-v. Back
  94. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v. Back
  95. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  96. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v-22r. Back
  97. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  98. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r. Back
  99. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  100. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r-v. Back
  101. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  102. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v. Back
  103. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  104. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v-23r. Back
  105. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  106. Followed by a partly illegible deleted word, perhaps 'estate'? Back
  107. NAS, PA2/16, f.23r-v. Back
  108. 'P' printed in margin beside heading. Back
  109. NAS, PA2/16, f.23v-24r. Back
  110. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  111. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r. Back
  112. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  113. Uncertain meaning. Back
  114. Defined in DSL as 'The name of a water-fowl, wintering in Orkney and Shetland, and variously described as a variety of the teal, the pochard and the widgeon'. Back
  115. According to DSL, 'Origin and precise application obscure: the name of some (apparently aquatic) bird ... the guillemot or the razorbill, ? from the cries'. Back
  116. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r-v. Back
  117. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  118. NAS, PA2/16, f.24v-25r. Back
  119. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  120. NAS, PA2/16, f.25r-v. Back
  121. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  122. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  123. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  124. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  125. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  126. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, with or without sleeves, usually of leather lined or padded, and in the 16th century sometimes iron-plated or faced with mail. Back
  127. NAS, PA2/16, f.26r-27r. Back
  128. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  129. 'March' crossed out. Back
  130. NAS, PA2/16, f.27r-v. Back
  131. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  132. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v. Back
  133. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  134. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v-28r. Back
  135. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  136. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  137. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  138. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  139. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  140. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v. Back
  141. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  142. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v-29r. Back
  143. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  144. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  145. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  146. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  147. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  148. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  149. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  150. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r-v. Back
  151. 'V' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  152. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v. Back
  153. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  154. NAS, PA2/16, f.29v. Back
  155. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  156. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v-30r. Back
  157. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  158. NAS, PA2/16, f.30r-32r. Back
  159. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  160. The text of this act, not including the title heading, is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/22. Back
  161. NAS, PA2/16, f.32r-34v. Back
  162. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  163. 'portioner' scored out and replaced with 'feu farmer'. Back
  164. Inserted in superscript. Back
  165. Inserted in superscript. Back
  166. Followed by a deleted and illegible word. Back
  167. NAS, PA2/16, f.34v-35r. Back
  168. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  169. 'never' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  170. 'out' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  171. NAS, PA2/16, f.35v - blank folio page. Back
Act in favour of the said Sir Thomas Erskine [of Gogar] of a yearly pension of 12 chalders of victual

Forasmuch as it is understood by his majesty and estates of this present parliament that Dame Dorothy Stewart, widow of the late William [Ruthven], earl of Gowrie, is in present possession of all and whole the third part of the lands, lordship and barony of Dirleton and pretends her to have right of the liferent of the same, through which the infeftment made by his majesty, with consent of the said estates, to his familiar and domestic servant Sir Thomas Erskine of Gogar, knight, his heirs and assignees of the said lands and barony of Dirleton cannot presently take effect by possession in his person until the quality of her right be tried by the law; therefore his majesty, respecting the late worthy and notable service done by the said Sir Thomas in defence and preservation of his majesty's life against the abominable treason conspired and attempted by the late John [Ruthven], sometime earl of Gowrie and the late Master Alexander Ruthven, his brother, against his majesty's most noble person and life upon 5 August last within his own great lodging of the town of Perth, and willing to gratify the said Sir Thomas, his heirs and assignees with the yearly pension underwritten out of his own property until his said infeftment of the said lands and barony of Dirleton may take full effect by possession in their persons, either by the decease of the said Dame Dorothy Stewart or by the eviction of the same lands and barony of Dirleton from her by the law, with advice and consent of this present parliament, gives, grants and conveys to the said Sir Thomas and his heirs a yearly pension of 12 chalders of victual to be yearly uplifted and taken by the said Sir Thomas and his foresaids out of the best and readiest payment of the whole fruits, rents, mails, ferms, kanes, customs and other duties whatsoever of the lands and lordship of Stirlingshire, his first entry thereto to be and begin in this instant crop and year of God 1600 and so forth yearly during the space foresaid; and for the more sure payment thereof his majesty, with consent foresaid, assigns and conveys to the said Sir Thomas and his heirs the ferms, kanes, customs and other duties of the lands particularly after-specified, namely: the lands of Blairlogie, paying yearly a chalder of wheat, a chalder of malt; the lands of Inverallan, with the mill, paying yearly a chalder of wheat, a chalder of barley; the lands of Logie, paying yearly 2 chalders of malt; the lands of Powhouse, alias Maner, paying yearly a chalder of wheat, a chalder of malt; the lands of Skeoch, alias Blairgib, paying yearly 14 bolls of barley; the lands of Greenyards, paying yearly 10 bolls of malt; the mill of Skeoch, 3 bolls of malt, Walkmyln and Walkershill, a boll of malt; and, out of the lands of Cornton, 2 chalders, 4 bolls of barley, and ordains the said Sir Thomas and his foresaids to be thankfully answered and obeyed of all and whole the ferms, mails and duties of the lands particularly above-specified of this present crop and year of God 1600 instant and also yearly in time coming during the space foresaid. And seeing the said pension is granted for great, evident and reasonable causes of the realm, therefore his majesty and estates foresaid decree and declare that the annexation of the said lands to the crown shall be no cause of nullity nor reduction of the said pension, nor that the same in any way falls nor shall fall under his majesty's revocations, general or special, nor shall in any way be comprehended under the same nor any other laws nor acts of parliament made or to be made in the contrary, annulling all pensions out of his highness's property, with the which acts of parliament, both general and special, which may be prejudicial in any way to this present gift and pension, his highness, with advice and consent foresaid, expressly dispenses and makes express derogation thereto by the authority of this present act in such sort that the said Sir Thomas and his heirs shall possess and enjoy peaceably the said pension of 12 chalders of victual during the space foresaid without any trouble or impediment to be made to them therein, discharging his highness's comptroller present and to come of all troubling, pursuing, charging, poinding or molesting of the said Sir Thomas and his heirs in the peaceable holding, enjoying and possession of the said pension or of the feuars, farmers, tenants, tacksmen and other possessors of the lands foresaid due in payment thereof during the space above-written, and also commanding the lords auditors of his highness's exchequer to allow the said yearly pension to the said Sir Thomas and his foresaids and also charging the lords of his highness's session to grant and direct letters of horning at the said Sir Thomas's instance against the said feuars, farmers, tenants, tacksmen and possessors of the said lands to answer, obey and make thankful payment to the said Sir Thomas and his foresaids of all and sundry the mails, ferms, kanes, profits and duties of the said lands of the said crop and year of God 1600 and also yearly in time coming during the space foresaid upon a simple charge of 10 days only. Moreover, our said sovereign lord, with advice foresaid, declares that the act of dissolution shall be extended to this present pension during this space thereof foresaid providing always that as soon as it shall happen the said Sir Thomas or his heirs to recover and enjoy the peaceable possession of all and whole the said lands and barony of Dirleton and others specified in his infeftment by the decease of the said Dame Dorothy Stewart, or otherwise by the order of law, that then and in that case this present letter of pension shall cease and expire in the self; and also providing that this present gift and pension shall in no way be prejudicial to the said Sir Thomas's infeftment of the said lands and barony of Dirleton and others specified therein principally conveyed to him and of the whole lands and lordship of Stirlingshire conveyed to him in clause of warrandice thereof. And for the said Sir Thomas's better security of the premises, his majesty, with advice foresaid, ordains if need be a letter of pension to be made by his highness and his comptroller under the privy seal in due form giving, granting and conveying to the said Sir Thomas and his foresaids all and whole the said yearly pension of 12 chalders of victual, containing the special assignation thereof above-mentioned with all the rest of the provisions and conditions above-specified and that the said letter of pension be extended in the best form with all clauses needful.

  1. NAS, PA2/16, f.2r. Back
  2. NAS, PA2/16, f.3r-7r. Back
  3. 'Ditty' written in margin, in contemporary hand. Back
  4. APS interpolation. Back
  5. 'Parthie' in mss. Back
  6. A contemporary comment in the margin refers to the 'ditty' against Alexander Ruthven. Back
  7. APS interpolation. Back
  8. 'Colin' written in superscript above 'Patrick', the latter name having been crossed out. All modifications written in contemporary hand. Back
  9. NAS, PA2/16, f.7r-11v. Back
  10. This must be the battering ram referred to in the second Latin summons at 1600/11/8 above. Back
  11. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, apparently so called because it was designed to be worn concealed under the outer clothes. Back
  12. Defined in DSL as a sleeve consisting of or reinforced by plate-armour. Back
  13. Word unclear. Back
  14. The following last 9 lines of NAS, PA2/16, f.8v are difficult to read due to smudging. Back
  15. Defined in DSL as a kind of close-fitting metal defensive headpiece, a metal skull-cap, commonly worn under a bonnet or other fabric covering. Common in the 16th century. Back
  16. At the bottom of NAS, PA2/16, f.9v there is a dark mark on the left of the folio that obscures the contents. Back
  17. Sections of text in NAS, PA2/16, f.10r-v are obscured by blotting. Back
  18. Sic. 'Hay' in 1600/11/8 above. Back
  19. Some this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  20. Some of this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  21. The last 12 lines of NAS PA2/16, f.11r (the following two and a half paragraphs) are obscured by a large blot. Back
  22. 'Alexander' scored out in APS. Back
  23. NAS, PA2/16, f.11v-12r.
    Text of act obscured by large blots.
    Back
  24. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r. Some of text obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  25. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  26. APS interpolation. Back
  27. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r-v. Much of this act is obscured by a blot in the folio. Back
  28. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  29. NAS, PA2/16, f.12v-13v. Back
  30. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  31. Word unclear. Back
  32. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  33. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  34. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  35. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  36. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v-15r. Back
  37. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  38. NAS, PA2/16, f.15r-v. Back
  39. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  40. NAS, PA2/16, f.16r-v. Back
  41. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  42. Possibly Spoutwells, Tayside. Back
  43. Blank spaces denote 2 deleted words, which are illegible. Back
  44. NAS, PA2/16, f.16v-17v. Bottom right hand corner of f.17r. is torn off, and consequently the left hand side of f.17v. Back
  45. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  46. 'and that the' superscript in contemporary hand. Back
  47. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  48. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  49. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  50. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  51. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  52. NAS, PA2/16, f.17v-19r. Back
  53. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  54. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  55. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  56. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  57. Word unclear. Back
  58. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  59. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  60. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  61. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  62. This act is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/68. Back
  63. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Mss returns to usual hand. Back
  64. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  65. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  66. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  67. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  68. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  69. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v-20r. Back
  70. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  71. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r. Back
  72. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  73. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r-v. Back
  74. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  75. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  76. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  77. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  78. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  79. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  80. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  81. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  82. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  83. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  84. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  85. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  86. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  87. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  88. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  89. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  90. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  91. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  92. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  93. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r-v. Back
  94. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v. Back
  95. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  96. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v-22r. Back
  97. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  98. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r. Back
  99. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  100. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r-v. Back
  101. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  102. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v. Back
  103. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  104. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v-23r. Back
  105. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  106. Followed by a partly illegible deleted word, perhaps 'estate'? Back
  107. NAS, PA2/16, f.23r-v. Back
  108. 'P' printed in margin beside heading. Back
  109. NAS, PA2/16, f.23v-24r. Back
  110. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  111. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r. Back
  112. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  113. Uncertain meaning. Back
  114. Defined in DSL as 'The name of a water-fowl, wintering in Orkney and Shetland, and variously described as a variety of the teal, the pochard and the widgeon'. Back
  115. According to DSL, 'Origin and precise application obscure: the name of some (apparently aquatic) bird ... the guillemot or the razorbill, ? from the cries'. Back
  116. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r-v. Back
  117. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  118. NAS, PA2/16, f.24v-25r. Back
  119. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  120. NAS, PA2/16, f.25r-v. Back
  121. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  122. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  123. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  124. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  125. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  126. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, with or without sleeves, usually of leather lined or padded, and in the 16th century sometimes iron-plated or faced with mail. Back
  127. NAS, PA2/16, f.26r-27r. Back
  128. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  129. 'March' crossed out. Back
  130. NAS, PA2/16, f.27r-v. Back
  131. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  132. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v. Back
  133. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  134. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v-28r. Back
  135. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  136. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  137. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  138. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  139. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  140. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v. Back
  141. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  142. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v-29r. Back
  143. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  144. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  145. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  146. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  147. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  148. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  149. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  150. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r-v. Back
  151. 'V' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  152. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v. Back
  153. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  154. NAS, PA2/16, f.29v. Back
  155. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  156. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v-30r. Back
  157. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  158. NAS, PA2/16, f.30r-32r. Back
  159. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  160. The text of this act, not including the title heading, is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/22. Back
  161. NAS, PA2/16, f.32r-34v. Back
  162. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  163. 'portioner' scored out and replaced with 'feu farmer'. Back
  164. Inserted in superscript. Back
  165. Inserted in superscript. Back
  166. Followed by a deleted and illegible word. Back
  167. NAS, PA2/16, f.34v-35r. Back
  168. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  169. 'never' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  170. 'out' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  171. NAS, PA2/16, f.35v - blank folio page. Back
Act in favour of Sir Hugh Herries regarding his pension of 20 chalders of victual

Forasmuch as it is understood by his majesty and estates of this present parliament that Dame Dorothy Stewart, widow of the late William [Ruthven], earl of Gowrie, is in present possession of all and whole the town, lands and barony of Cousland, with the pertinents, lying within the sheriffdom of Edinburgh, through which the heritable infeftment made thereof by his majesty, with consent of the said estates, to his familiar and domestic servant Sir Hugh Herries, gentleman of his highness's chamber, cannot presently take effect in his person until the quality of her right be tried by the law; therefore, his majesty, respecting the late worthy and notable service done by the said Sir Hugh in defence and preservation of his majesty's life against the abominable treason conspired and attempted by the late John [Ruthven], sometime earl of Gowrie, and the late Master Alexander Ruthven, his brother, against his majesty's most noble person and life upon 5 August last within the said sometime earl's own great lodging in the town of Perth, and willing to gratify the said Sir Hugh, his heirs and assignees with the yearly pension underwritten out of his highness property until the said infeftment of the said lands and barony of Cousland may take full effect by possession in their persons, either by decease of the said Dame Dorothy Stewart or by the eviction of the same lands and barony of Cousland from her by the law, with advice and consent of this present parliament, gives, grants and conveys to the said Sir Hugh, his heirs and assignees a yearly pension of 20 chalders of victual thereof, 10 chalders, 10 bolls of barley and 9 chalders, 6 bolls of meal to be yearly uplifted and taken by the said Sir Hugh and his foresaids out of the best and readiest payment of the whole fruits, rents, mails, ferms, kanes, customs and other duties whatsoever of the lands and lordship of Scone and Gowrie, his first entry thereto to be and begin in this instant crop and year of God 1600 and so forth yearly during the space foresaid. And for the more sure payment thereof his majesty, with consent foresaid, specially assigns and conveys to the said Sir Hugh, his heirs and assignees the ferms and duties of the particular lands after-specified, namely: 13 bolls, 2 firlots of barley, 20 bolls of meal out of the lands of Blair pertaining to George Drummond of Blair; 4 bolls of meal, 4 bolls, 2 firlots of barley out of the said lands of Blair possessed by [...], widow of the late David Nairn in Blair; 6 bolls of barley, 14 bolls of meal out of the lands of Little Blair pertaining to Andrew Herring of Little Blair; 33 bolls of barley out of the lands of Clevin pertaining to William Ogilvie of Clevin; 6 bolls of barley, 10 bolls of meal out of the lands of Friarton pertaining to Andrew and Alexander Blair of Friarton; 5 bolls of barley out of the lands of Polkmyln possessed by William Brown there; 4 bolls of barley out of the lands of Bonhard pertaining to Adam Hepburn of Bonhard; 8 bolls, 1 firlot of barley, 10 bolls, 2 firlots of meal out of the lands of Balformok pertaining to Robert Graham of Balformok; 8 bolls of barley, 10 bolls of meal out of the lands of Arnbathie pertaining to Patrick Lindsay of Arnbathie; 2 bolls of barley, 4 bolls of meal out of the lands of Spoutwallis pertaining to John Rattray of Spoutwallis; 17 bolls of meal out of the lands of Ewelyk pertaining to John Lindsay of Ewelyk; 2 bolls, 2 firlots of barley, 6 bolls, 2 firlots of meal out of the lands of Boghall possessed by John Lindsay; 4 bolls of barley, 10 bolls of meal out of the lands of Gairdrum possessed by John Chalmers there; 26 bolls, 1 firlot, 1 peck of barley, 8 bolls of meal out of the lands of Clein possessed by Andrew Simm there; 14 bolls of barley and 8 bolls meal out of the said lands of Clein possessed by John Ogilvie there; 2 bolls of barley, 10 bolls of meal out of the lands of Nether Collave possessed by James Kinross and [...], widow of the late John Wallace there; 36 bolls of barley out of the said lands of Nether Collave possessed by Laurence Drummond there; 13 bolls of barley out of the lands of Clein possessed by John Little there [...] [...], extending in the whole to the said 20 chalders of victual above-specified. And in special warrandice of the said pension giving and conveying to the said Sir Hugh, his heirs and assignees foresaid all and sundry the feu ferms and duties of the lands respectively after-specified, being a part of his highness's property, that is to say the feu ferms of the lands and barony of Largo, extending yearly to 5 chalders of oats, 3 chalders, 8 bolls of barley and a chalder, 10 bolls of wheat; the feu ferms of the lands of Ardeth, extending yearly to 4 chalders, 4 bolls of barley and 3 chalders, 4 bolls of wheat; and the feu ferms of the lands of Rathillet, with their pertinents, extending yearly to 2 chalders, 4 bolls of barley and 10 bolls of wheat; and that in special warrandice and security of the principal pension foresaid so that if it shall happen the said Sir Hugh or his foresaids to be troubled, deprived or molested in the peaceable possessing and enjoying thereof or the same to be evicted from them by restitution of the said sometime earl, reduction of his forfeiture or by whatsoever other manner of way, that then and in that case the said Sir Hugh and his foresaids shall have as often full and free regress, ingress and access in and to all and sundry the said feu ferms of the said lands of Largo, Ardeth and Rathillet, with their pertinents, given in warrandice foresaid, to be possessed and enjoyed by them until they may peaceably and freely possess the said principal pension, without troubling as said is, and ordains the said Sir Hugh and his foresaids to be thankfully answered and obeyed of the said pension of this present crop and year of God 1600 instant and also yearly in time coming during the space foresaid. And seeing the said pension is granted for great, evident and reasonable causes of the realm, therefore his majesty and estates foresaid decree and declare that the annexation of the said lands to the crown shall be no cause of annulling or reduction of the said pension nor that the same in any way falls nor shall fall under his majesty's revocations, special nor general, nor shall in any way be comprehended under the same nor any other laws or acts of parliament made or to be made relating thereto in time coming, annulling all pensions out of his highness's property or annexed lands, with the which acts of parliament, both general and special, which may be prejudicial in any way to this present gift and pension, his highness, with advice and consent foresaid, expressly dispenses and makes express derogation thereto by the authority of this present act in such sort that the said Sir Hugh, his heirs and assignees shall possess and enjoy peaceably the said pension of 20 chalders of victual during the space foresaid without any trouble or impediment to be made to them, therein discharging [Sir David Murray of Gospertie], his highness's comptroller, and [Master John Preston of Penicuik], his collector, and all their officers present and to come of all troubling, pursuing, charging, poinding or molesting of the said Sir Hugh, his heirs and assignees in the peaceable holding, enjoying and possessing of the said pension or of the feuars, farmers, tenants, tacksmen and other possessors of the said lands due in payment thereof during the space above-mentioned; and also commanding the lords auditors of his highness's exchequer to allow the said yearly pension to the said Sir Hugh and his foresaids and also charging the lords of his highness's session to grant and direct letters of horning and poinding at the said Sir Hugh's instance charging the said feuars, tenants, farmers, tacksmen and possessors of the said lands to answer, obey and make thankful payment to the said Sir Hugh and his foresaids of all and sundry the said ferms and duties of the said lands of the said crop and year of God 1600 and also yearly in time coming during the space foresaid upon a simple charge of 10 days only. Moreover, our sovereign lord, with advice foresaid, finds and declares that the act of dissolution shall be extended to this present pension during the space thereof foresaid, providing always that as soon as it shall happen the said Sir Hugh, his heirs and assignees to recover and enjoy the peaceable possession of all and whole the said lands and barony of Cousland and teinds thereof and others specified in his infeftment by the decease of the said Dame Dorothy Stewart or otherwise by the order of law, that then and in that case this present letter of pension shall cease and expire in the self; and likewise providing that this present gift and pension shall in no way be prejudicial to the said Sir Hugh's infeftment of the said lands and barony of Cousland and others specified therein, as well principal as warrandice, and for the said Sir Hugh's better security of the premises, his majesty, with advice foresaid, ordains if need be a letter of pension to be made by his highness and his comptroller and his collector and all other officers whom it pertains under the privy seal in due form, giving, granting and conveying to the said Sir Hugh and his foresaids all and whole the said yearly pension of 20 chalders of victual, containing the special assignation thereof above-written with all the rest of the provisions and conditions above-specified and that the said letter be extended in the best form with all clauses needful.

  1. NAS, PA2/16, f.2r. Back
  2. NAS, PA2/16, f.3r-7r. Back
  3. 'Ditty' written in margin, in contemporary hand. Back
  4. APS interpolation. Back
  5. 'Parthie' in mss. Back
  6. A contemporary comment in the margin refers to the 'ditty' against Alexander Ruthven. Back
  7. APS interpolation. Back
  8. 'Colin' written in superscript above 'Patrick', the latter name having been crossed out. All modifications written in contemporary hand. Back
  9. NAS, PA2/16, f.7r-11v. Back
  10. This must be the battering ram referred to in the second Latin summons at 1600/11/8 above. Back
  11. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, apparently so called because it was designed to be worn concealed under the outer clothes. Back
  12. Defined in DSL as a sleeve consisting of or reinforced by plate-armour. Back
  13. Word unclear. Back
  14. The following last 9 lines of NAS, PA2/16, f.8v are difficult to read due to smudging. Back
  15. Defined in DSL as a kind of close-fitting metal defensive headpiece, a metal skull-cap, commonly worn under a bonnet or other fabric covering. Common in the 16th century. Back
  16. At the bottom of NAS, PA2/16, f.9v there is a dark mark on the left of the folio that obscures the contents. Back
  17. Sections of text in NAS, PA2/16, f.10r-v are obscured by blotting. Back
  18. Sic. 'Hay' in 1600/11/8 above. Back
  19. Some this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  20. Some of this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  21. The last 12 lines of NAS PA2/16, f.11r (the following two and a half paragraphs) are obscured by a large blot. Back
  22. 'Alexander' scored out in APS. Back
  23. NAS, PA2/16, f.11v-12r.
    Text of act obscured by large blots.
    Back
  24. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r. Some of text obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  25. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  26. APS interpolation. Back
  27. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r-v. Much of this act is obscured by a blot in the folio. Back
  28. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  29. NAS, PA2/16, f.12v-13v. Back
  30. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  31. Word unclear. Back
  32. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  33. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  34. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  35. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  36. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v-15r. Back
  37. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  38. NAS, PA2/16, f.15r-v. Back
  39. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  40. NAS, PA2/16, f.16r-v. Back
  41. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  42. Possibly Spoutwells, Tayside. Back
  43. Blank spaces denote 2 deleted words, which are illegible. Back
  44. NAS, PA2/16, f.16v-17v. Bottom right hand corner of f.17r. is torn off, and consequently the left hand side of f.17v. Back
  45. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  46. 'and that the' superscript in contemporary hand. Back
  47. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  48. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  49. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  50. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  51. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  52. NAS, PA2/16, f.17v-19r. Back
  53. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  54. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  55. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  56. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  57. Word unclear. Back
  58. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  59. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  60. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  61. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  62. This act is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/68. Back
  63. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Mss returns to usual hand. Back
  64. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  65. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  66. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  67. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  68. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  69. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v-20r. Back
  70. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  71. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r. Back
  72. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  73. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r-v. Back
  74. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  75. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  76. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  77. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  78. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  79. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  80. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  81. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  82. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  83. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  84. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  85. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  86. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  87. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  88. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  89. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  90. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  91. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  92. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  93. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r-v. Back
  94. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v. Back
  95. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  96. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v-22r. Back
  97. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  98. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r. Back
  99. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  100. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r-v. Back
  101. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  102. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v. Back
  103. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  104. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v-23r. Back
  105. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  106. Followed by a partly illegible deleted word, perhaps 'estate'? Back
  107. NAS, PA2/16, f.23r-v. Back
  108. 'P' printed in margin beside heading. Back
  109. NAS, PA2/16, f.23v-24r. Back
  110. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  111. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r. Back
  112. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  113. Uncertain meaning. Back
  114. Defined in DSL as 'The name of a water-fowl, wintering in Orkney and Shetland, and variously described as a variety of the teal, the pochard and the widgeon'. Back
  115. According to DSL, 'Origin and precise application obscure: the name of some (apparently aquatic) bird ... the guillemot or the razorbill, ? from the cries'. Back
  116. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r-v. Back
  117. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  118. NAS, PA2/16, f.24v-25r. Back
  119. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  120. NAS, PA2/16, f.25r-v. Back
  121. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  122. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  123. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  124. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  125. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  126. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, with or without sleeves, usually of leather lined or padded, and in the 16th century sometimes iron-plated or faced with mail. Back
  127. NAS, PA2/16, f.26r-27r. Back
  128. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  129. 'March' crossed out. Back
  130. NAS, PA2/16, f.27r-v. Back
  131. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  132. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v. Back
  133. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  134. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v-28r. Back
  135. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  136. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  137. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  138. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  139. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  140. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v. Back
  141. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  142. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v-29r. Back
  143. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  144. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  145. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  146. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  147. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  148. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  149. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  150. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r-v. Back
  151. 'V' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  152. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v. Back
  153. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  154. NAS, PA2/16, f.29v. Back
  155. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  156. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v-30r. Back
  157. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  158. NAS, PA2/16, f.30r-32r. Back
  159. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  160. The text of this act, not including the title heading, is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/22. Back
  161. NAS, PA2/16, f.32r-34v. Back
  162. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  163. 'portioner' scored out and replaced with 'feu farmer'. Back
  164. Inserted in superscript. Back
  165. Inserted in superscript. Back
  166. Followed by a deleted and illegible word. Back
  167. NAS, PA2/16, f.34v-35r. Back
  168. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  169. 'never' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  170. 'out' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  171. NAS, PA2/16, f.35v - blank folio page. Back
Act in favour of Sir John Ramsay regarding an infeftment to be made to him of the lands of East Barns

Our sovereign lord, with advice of the estates of this present parliament, calling to remembrance the most excellent and singular service done to his majesty and to this whole realm upon 5 August last by Sir John Ramsay of East Barns, knight, at Perth, within the lodging of the late John [Ruthven], sometime earl of Gowrie, in assisting, defending and revenging of his majesty against the said sometime earl and the late Master Alexander Ruthven, his brother, who, having most definitely and falsely upon pretence of great service to be done by the said Master Alexander to his majesty, lured his highness to come from Falkland to the said burgh of Perth to the said sometime earl's lodging; and there the said late Master Alexander having most secretly and treasonably convoyed his highness to the turret of the said lodging upon set purpose to have cruelly and vilely murdered his majesty by assistance of an armed man enclosed therein by the said sometime earl and Master Alexander, and prepared with armour and weapons necessary for that wicked purpose, and the said late Master Alexander, with most vile language and horrible cruelty, having then treasonably put violent hands in his grace's most sacred person, offering himself to the utmost of his rage and malice to have bereft his majesty of his life and only prevented by that courageous resistance which his majesty, destitute of all manner of armour, weapons or other help, could possibly make, at last, by the merciful providence and saviour of God, his highness, coming to the window of the said turret by force and despite of the said late Master Alexander, and by his cry making warning to his grace's faithful servants and subjects, being of accident upon the street opposite the said window, of the foresaid most horrible enterprise and treasonable violence used against his most royal person and life, the said Sir John Ramsay, albeit at that time further removed from the place of his highness's danger than the most part of his highness's remaining faithful servants yet led by the spirit of God and vehement affection to spend his life in safety of his most gracious prince and master, came with so wonderful diligence to his majesty's relief that entering before all others within the said chamber where his highness was so treasonably and cruelly assailed and pursued and finding his majesty without armour or weapons in that exceptional distress and strife against that desperate traitor provided for that purpose, the said Sir John made such help to his majesty that after certain wounds given with his dagger to the said Master Alexander expelled him out of the said chamber, foreseeing the danger that might ensue by the said late earl's prosecuting of the said treasonable enterprise. For better resistance thereof, the said Sir John called Sir Thomas Erskine of Gogar and Sir Hugh Herries to his highness's defence, who scarcely could with such diligence come to the said Sir John as the foresaid sometime earl, accompanied with a great number of desperate traitors speedily following and fiercely invading them in the said chamber for slaughter of his majesty, and his said faithful servants ready to die in his defence, and having by the advantage of armour and number of his accomplices reduced them to very great extremity, at length the said Sir John Ramsay, with marvellous valour and divine success, assailed so courageously the said traitors that having struck the said earl through the heart and wounded sundry of his treasonable accomplices expelled them with assistance of the said Sir Thomas and Sir Hugh out of the said chamber, whereby their whole devilish enterprises were disappointed by the great providence of God and courageous resistance of the king's majesty, with the faithful concurrence of the said Sir John and remainder of his grace's faithful servants his highness was miraculously preserved and the whole estates, body and members of this commonwealth thereby delivered from extreme danger of confusion, wrack and utter subversion. Which being manifest and known to this whole realm and clearly and evidently verified, tried and proven to the whole estates convened in this present parliament and found by them the most singular and happy service that could fall in a subject's hand to do to his prince and to have tended to the highest blessing and well that could have been wished of God to this realm, our said sovereign lord and estates foresaid, willing to gratify and reward the said Sir John Ramsay and his heirs, find, decree and declare that the said service done by him in manner above-mentioned is great, weighty and acceptable service to his majesty and to this whole realm, and that the lands after-specified, conveyed to the said Sir John for the same, are conveyed for great, evident and reasonable causes of the realm. For the which causes, albeit his highness's annexed property may not be conveyed by his majesty, his predecessors or successors, yet, in the first act of annexation of lands to the crown made by King James II of most noble and worthy memory, it is excepted, considered and provided that the annexed lands to the crown may be conveyed by the kings of Scotland by advice, deliverance and decreet of the whole parliament for great, evident and weighty causes of the realm; and so the singular service above-mentioned being found and declared by his majesty and whole estates of this parliament to be a great, evident and reasonable cause of the realm for the which his majesty may convey the lands underwritten, therefore our sovereign lord, with advice of the whole estates of this present parliament, ordains a charter to be made under the great seal in due form in favour of the said Sir John Ramsay, his heirs and assignees containing the narrative above-specified and making mention that it is found and declared by act of this present parliament that the said Sir John Ramsay's service above-mentioned is found, decreed and declared a great, evident and reasonable cause, tending to the well of his majesty and of this whole realm, for granting and conveying to the said Sir John and that the foresaid estates may convey to the said Sir John the lands underwritten, giving, granting and conveying to the said Sir John Ramsay, his heirs and assignees heritably the lands of East Barns, occupied presently by John Bryson there, paying yearly 52 bolls and 2 pecks, half wheat, half barley; John Gullane there, paying yearly 52 bolls and 2 pecks, half wheat and half barley; William Maslett there, paying yearly 52 bolls, 2 pecks; George Smith there, paying yearly 26 bolls, 1 peck; John Purves there, paying yearly 26 bolls, 1 peck of wheat and barley; [...] Purves there, paying 26 bolls, 1 peck of wheat and barley; George Maslett there, paying yearly 26 bolls, 1 peck; and William Wolf there, paying yearly 26 bolls, 1 peck of wheat and barley; the lands of Newtonlees, occupied by Master John Acheson, paying yearly 72 bolls, 3 pecks of wheat and barley; the lands of Rig and Fluiris, occupied by William Kelly, treasurer of Dunbar, paying yearly 33 bolls, 1 [...], William Nisbet, portioner of Newton, paying yearly 20 [...] extending to 26 chalders of victual of the[...] tenants, tenancies, service of free tenants parti[...], lying in the parish and lordship of Dunbar wi[...][...]dom of Edinburgh, to be held of our sovereign lord and his grace's successors in free blench for payment of a red rose yearly upon 5 August in name of blench ferm, if it be asked only, with power to reduce all and whatsoever infeftments, rights and title made to whatsoever persons of the foresaid lands or any part thereof for any cause, ground or occasion competent of the law, and to set the same in feu ferm or otherwise convey thereupon at his pleasure in all time coming. And to the effect the foresaid infeftment of the lands above-written may be effectual and stand perpetually valid to the said Sir John Ramsay, his heirs and assignees, our sovereign lord, with advice of the said estates, dissolves the said lands particularly above-rehearsed, union and annexation thereof from the patrimony of the crown in all time coming as if the same had never been annexed to the effect above-mentioned; and likewise his majesty, with advice of the said estates, for the good, true and thankful service foresaid, by the tenor hereof, grants and conveys to the said Sir John Ramsay the whole ferms and duties of all and sundry the towns and lands particularly above-rehearsed of the crop and year of God 1600 years instant, with power to him to uplift, receive and intromit with the same from the tenants, occupiers and possessors thereof to his own behalf and utility and upon his receipt to grant acquittances, which shall be sufficient to the receivers as if his majesty and his comptroller had received the same and gave discharges thereupon.

  1. NAS, PA2/16, f.2r. Back
  2. NAS, PA2/16, f.3r-7r. Back
  3. 'Ditty' written in margin, in contemporary hand. Back
  4. APS interpolation. Back
  5. 'Parthie' in mss. Back
  6. A contemporary comment in the margin refers to the 'ditty' against Alexander Ruthven. Back
  7. APS interpolation. Back
  8. 'Colin' written in superscript above 'Patrick', the latter name having been crossed out. All modifications written in contemporary hand. Back
  9. NAS, PA2/16, f.7r-11v. Back
  10. This must be the battering ram referred to in the second Latin summons at 1600/11/8 above. Back
  11. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, apparently so called because it was designed to be worn concealed under the outer clothes. Back
  12. Defined in DSL as a sleeve consisting of or reinforced by plate-armour. Back
  13. Word unclear. Back
  14. The following last 9 lines of NAS, PA2/16, f.8v are difficult to read due to smudging. Back
  15. Defined in DSL as a kind of close-fitting metal defensive headpiece, a metal skull-cap, commonly worn under a bonnet or other fabric covering. Common in the 16th century. Back
  16. At the bottom of NAS, PA2/16, f.9v there is a dark mark on the left of the folio that obscures the contents. Back
  17. Sections of text in NAS, PA2/16, f.10r-v are obscured by blotting. Back
  18. Sic. 'Hay' in 1600/11/8 above. Back
  19. Some this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  20. Some of this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  21. The last 12 lines of NAS PA2/16, f.11r (the following two and a half paragraphs) are obscured by a large blot. Back
  22. 'Alexander' scored out in APS. Back
  23. NAS, PA2/16, f.11v-12r.
    Text of act obscured by large blots.
    Back
  24. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r. Some of text obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  25. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  26. APS interpolation. Back
  27. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r-v. Much of this act is obscured by a blot in the folio. Back
  28. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  29. NAS, PA2/16, f.12v-13v. Back
  30. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  31. Word unclear. Back
  32. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  33. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  34. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  35. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  36. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v-15r. Back
  37. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  38. NAS, PA2/16, f.15r-v. Back
  39. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  40. NAS, PA2/16, f.16r-v. Back
  41. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  42. Possibly Spoutwells, Tayside. Back
  43. Blank spaces denote 2 deleted words, which are illegible. Back
  44. NAS, PA2/16, f.16v-17v. Bottom right hand corner of f.17r. is torn off, and consequently the left hand side of f.17v. Back
  45. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  46. 'and that the' superscript in contemporary hand. Back
  47. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  48. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  49. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  50. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  51. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  52. NAS, PA2/16, f.17v-19r. Back
  53. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  54. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  55. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  56. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  57. Word unclear. Back
  58. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  59. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  60. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  61. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  62. This act is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/68. Back
  63. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Mss returns to usual hand. Back
  64. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  65. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  66. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  67. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  68. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  69. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v-20r. Back
  70. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  71. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r. Back
  72. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  73. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r-v. Back
  74. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  75. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  76. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  77. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  78. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  79. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  80. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  81. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  82. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  83. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  84. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  85. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  86. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  87. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  88. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  89. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  90. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  91. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  92. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  93. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r-v. Back
  94. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v. Back
  95. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  96. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v-22r. Back
  97. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  98. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r. Back
  99. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  100. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r-v. Back
  101. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  102. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v. Back
  103. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  104. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v-23r. Back
  105. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  106. Followed by a partly illegible deleted word, perhaps 'estate'? Back
  107. NAS, PA2/16, f.23r-v. Back
  108. 'P' printed in margin beside heading. Back
  109. NAS, PA2/16, f.23v-24r. Back
  110. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  111. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r. Back
  112. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  113. Uncertain meaning. Back
  114. Defined in DSL as 'The name of a water-fowl, wintering in Orkney and Shetland, and variously described as a variety of the teal, the pochard and the widgeon'. Back
  115. According to DSL, 'Origin and precise application obscure: the name of some (apparently aquatic) bird ... the guillemot or the razorbill, ? from the cries'. Back
  116. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r-v. Back
  117. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  118. NAS, PA2/16, f.24v-25r. Back
  119. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  120. NAS, PA2/16, f.25r-v. Back
  121. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  122. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  123. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  124. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  125. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  126. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, with or without sleeves, usually of leather lined or padded, and in the 16th century sometimes iron-plated or faced with mail. Back
  127. NAS, PA2/16, f.26r-27r. Back
  128. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  129. 'March' crossed out. Back
  130. NAS, PA2/16, f.27r-v. Back
  131. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  132. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v. Back
  133. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  134. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v-28r. Back
  135. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  136. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  137. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  138. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  139. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  140. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v. Back
  141. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  142. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v-29r. Back
  143. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  144. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  145. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  146. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  147. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  148. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  149. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  150. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r-v. Back
  151. 'V' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  152. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v. Back
  153. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  154. NAS, PA2/16, f.29v. Back
  155. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  156. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v-30r. Back
  157. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  158. NAS, PA2/16, f.30r-32r. Back
  159. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  160. The text of this act, not including the title heading, is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/22. Back
  161. NAS, PA2/16, f.32r-34v. Back
  162. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  163. 'portioner' scored out and replaced with 'feu farmer'. Back
  164. Inserted in superscript. Back
  165. Inserted in superscript. Back
  166. Followed by a deleted and illegible word. Back
  167. NAS, PA2/16, f.34v-35r. Back
  168. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  169. 'never' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  170. 'out' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  171. NAS, PA2/16, f.35v - blank folio page. Back
Act in favour of Sir Hugh Herries regarding an infeftment to be made to him of the lands of Cousland and 20 chalders of victual out of Scone

Our sovereign lord, with advice of the estates of his highness's realm convened in this present parliament, calling to remembrance the good, true and thankful service done to his majesty this long time bygone by his familiar and domestic servant Sir Hugh Herries, gentleman of his majesty's chamber, not only within this realm but also in foreign countries where he has been employed by his highness, meriting good remembrance, and specially considering the worthiness of the late notable service done to his majesty by the said Sir Hugh upon 5 August last at Perth within the great lodging of the late John [Ruthven], sometime earl of Gowrie, in the resisting of the unnatural, ungodly and abominable treason and conspiracy attempted by the said late earl and the late Master Alexander Ruthven, his brother, against his majesty's most noble person, he being for the time secretly and treasonably convoyed by the said late Master Alexander Ruthven to the turret of the said lodging of set purpose and intention there to have murdered and bereft his majesty of his life; and being then destitute of all his servants and standing courageously in the meantime upon the defence of his own life, the said Sir Hugh came to his majesty's rescue and relief and exposed his own life to the most evident peril and danger of death, to the great effusion of his blood, shed by the said traitors and their accomplices, in the defence of his majesty's person and by the providence of God assisted his highness most valiantly and courageously in the preserving of his highness's person out of their bloody hands. And seeing it has pleased God to honour the said Sir Hugh with this dignity by his prowess, manhood and virtue to be one of the chief instruments of the preservation and delivery of his majesty's most royal person, to his great praise and commendation, and thereby his majesty's nobles and whole estates of his highness's realm have reported so rare and singular a benefit of the safety and continuance of their natural prince and sovereign to reign over them in justice and equity to the great glory of God, tranquillity of this realm and universal comfort and solace of the whole people, which being great, evident and reasonable causes of the realm and being duly and sufficiently verified and proven before the lords of articles and whole estates of this present parliament, therefore, his majesty, moved of his princely honour and conscience to be mindful of the said most worthy and acceptable service and to gratify the said Sir Hugh with some honourable reward thereof, to encourage him to persevere in his sincere affection towards his majesty's service and to steer and provoke all others of his good subjects by his good and laudable example to be followers of his virtue and courage in their dutiful obedience and service to his majesty's and his successors' careful preservation and defence of their lives and honours according to their bound duties, with consent and authority of this present parliament, ordains an infeftment to be made under his great seal in due form giving, granting and conveying to the said Sir Hugh, his heirs and assignees heritably all and whole the town, lands and barony of Cousland, with the tower, fortalice, manor place, houses, buildings, yards, orchards, dovecots, mills, multures, tenants, tenancies, service of free tenants thereof, advocation and donation of the chaplainries thereof and all their pertinents, lying within the sheriffdom of Edinburgh, which lands and others respectively foresaid pertained heritably of before to the said late John, sometime earl of Gowrie, at the least the said late earl had right to succeed thereto as apparent [...] to the late James [Ruthven], earl of Gowrie, his brother, or the late William [Ruthven], earl of Gowrie, his father, [...] was heritably infeft and seised in the same. And now the said lands, baronies [...] respectively foresaid pertains to our said sovereign lord, fallen and become in his highness's hands and at his highness's gift and disposition by reason of escheat through the process and doom of forfeiture orderly led and deduced against the said late John, sometime earl of Gowrie, and the said late Master Alexander Ruthven, his brother, for certain crimes of treason and lese-majesty committed by them of the which they were convicted in this present parliament, as in the process and doom of forfeiture led and deduced thereupon at more length is contained, or by virtue of whatsoever other right, cause or occasion that the same lands and others respectively foresaid may fall and become in his highness's hands; and for the said Sir Hugh and his foresaids better security, giving and conveying to them the escheat of all and whatsoever reversions, bonds, contracts, obligations or promises for making of revisions made and granted by whatsoever person or persons to the said late John, sometime earl of Gowrie, or any of his predecessors for redemption of the lands above-specified with their pertinents, with all other rights, titles, contracts, bonds and obligations made and conceived in favour of the said late John, sometime earl of Gowrie, or any of his predecessors or in favour of the said late Master Alexander Ruthven, his brother, whereby the property and possession of the said lands with their pertinents might have returned and pertained to them or either of them, or whereby they or either of them might have acclaimed or recovered any right, title, property or possession of the same lands with their pertinents now pertaining likewise to our said sovereign lord and at his highness's gift and disposition by reason of escheat through the process and doom of forfeiture foresaid orderly led and deduced against the said late John, sometime earl of Gowrie, and the said late Master Alexander, his brother, as said is, with full power to the said Sir Hugh and his foresaids to call and pursue the possessors of the said reversions, contracts, bonds, obligations, rights and securities for delivery of the same to them, and to use all necessary execution thereupon for fulfilling of the same to them and to redeem and outquit the lands above-specified, with their pertinents, by virtue of the said revisions according to the tenor of the same and to use and exercise all other things necessary for recovering and obtaining of the right and possession of the said lands, with their pertinents, in the same way and as freely in all respects as the said sometime earl or any of his predecessors or the said late Master Alexander or any of them might have done themselves by virtue of the same revisions, rights and evidents; and also renouncing and transferring for his majesty and his successors all right, title, interest and claim of right, both property and possession, which his highness or his successors may claim, have or pretend in and to the same lands, with their pertinents, by reason of ward, relief, non-entries, recognition, forfeiture, bastardry, purpresture, disclamation or for whatsoever other cause or occasion present, bygone or to come to the said Sir Hugh, his heirs and assignees heritably for now and ever, with a supplement of all the defaults and with an agreement not to appeal, and likewise giving, granting and conveying to the said Sir Hugh and his foresaids the gift of escheat of all and sundry tacks, assedations made and granted to the said late John, sometime earl of Gowrie, or any of his predecessors to whom he has succeeded or may succeed as heir or in any way conceived in his favour of all and sundry the teind sheaves and other teinds, fruits, rents and emoluments, as well parsonage as vicarage, of all and sundry the said town, lands and barony of Cousland with their parts, pendicles and pertinents now fallen and become likewise in his majesty's hands by reason of escheat through the process and doom of forfeiture foresaid, orderly led and deduced against the said sometime earl as said is or through whatsoever other cause or occasion whereby the escheat of the said teinds and right thereof has pertained or may pertain to his majesty in any way, with power to the said Sir Hugh and his foresaids to collect, gather, lead, teind, intromit with, set, use and convey upon all and sundry the said teinds yearly in time coming during all the years contained in the said rights and tacks to run and, if need be, to call and pursue for that as appropriate. Likewise our said sovereign lord, with advice foresaid, for the causes above-specified, faithfully promises in the first word and binds and obliges his highness and his successors to perfect and deliver to the said Sir Hugh and his foresaids new sufficient letters of tacks and assedations of all and sundry the said teind sheaves and other teinds, fruits, rents and emoluments, as well parsonage as vicarage, of all and whole the said town, lands and barony of Cousland, with parts, pendicles and pertinents now fallen and pertaining likewise in his majesty's hands by reason of escheat through [...] for such spaces as they shall devise, for yearly payment of the duty thereof presently paid for that, and at the expiry of the said tacks and so often after the same expires to renew the same as often for the duty foresaid, to the effect the said Sir Hugh and his foresaids may peaceably possess and enjoy the same teinds with the lands foresaid perpetually in all time coming, without any revocation, question or contradiction whatsoever and to that effect to make and perfect such right and security to them thereupon as can, or may be, devised, which teinds are esteemed by his majesty, with consent foresaid, to extend yearly to 10 chalders of victual. And for the said Sir Hugh's better security of the lands, teinds and others respectively above-specified, conveyed in manner foresaid and in special clause of warrandice thereof, giving, granting and conveying to him, his heirs and assignees above-mentioned all and sundry the lands and others respectively after-specified and feu ferms thereof, being a part of his highness's property and lordship of [...], lying within [...]; that is to say: all and whole the lands of Largo, with the pertinents and feu ferms thereof, extending yearly to 5 chalders of oats, 3 chalders, 8 bolls of barley and 1 chalder, 10 bolls of wheat; all and whole the lands of Ardeth, with the pertinents and feu ferms thereof, extending yearly to 4 chalders, 4 bolls of barley and 3 chalders, 4 bolls of wheat; and all and whole the lands of Rathillet, with their pertinents and feu ferms thereof, extending yearly to 2 chalders, 4 bolls of barley and 2 bolls of wheat; and that in special warrandice of the said town, lands and barony of Cousland, with the teind sheaves thereof above-specified principally conveyed as said is, so that if it shall happen the said Sir Hugh or his foresaids to be molested, deprived or troubled in the peaceable possessing and enjoying thereof or in the intromitting and taking up of the mails, ferms, profits and duties of the same or any part thereof or the same to be evicted from them by restitution of the said late John, sometime earl of Gowrie, or reduction of the said forfeiture or for whatsoever other cause or occasion in any time coming, or if it shall happen his majesty or his successors to fail in perfecting of the tack and assedation of the said teind sheaves and in the renewing of the said tacks perpetually after expiring of the former tacks, each one after others respectively and successively, to the said Sir Hugh, his heirs and assignees, and that the said Sir Hugh and his foresaids be debarred from the right and possession of the said teind sheaves in any way in time coming, that then and in that case it shall be permissible to them as often to have full and free regress, ingress and access in and to all and sundry the lands respectively above-mentioned, with their pertinents and feu ferms thereof above-specified, given in warrandice in manner above-written, to be possessed and enjoyed by them until they may peaceably and freely possess and enjoy the said lands, teinds and others respectively above-mentioned principally conveyed as said is. And to the effect the said infeftment of warrandice of the lands above-specified and feu ferms thereof may be good, valid and effectual in the self to the said Sir Hugh, his heirs and assignees in all time coming, his majesty, of his own proper motive and certain knowledge, with consent and authority of this present parliament, in respect of the said great, evident and reasonable causes moving his majesty to the granting hereof allowed and proven by his highness's estates as said is, has dissolved and by this act dissolves all and sundry the said lands respectively and feu ferms thereof from all annexation of the same to the crown made by his majesty or any of his predecessors, to the effect the same may be conveyed in free blench ferm in manner underwritten to the said Sir Hugh, his heirs and assignees in special security and warrandice of the said town, lands and barony of Cousland, with the teinds thereof and their pertinents principally conveyed as said is; and also that the same infeftment shall contain an union and erection of the said town, lands and barony of Cousland, with the tower, fortalice, manor place, houses, buildings, yards, orchards, dovecots, mills, multures, tenants, tenancies, service of free tenants thereof, advocation and donation of the chaplainry thereof and all their pertinents in a whole and free barony, to be called in all time coming the barony of Cousland, and that a sasine to be taken at the principal mansion thereof shall be sufficient to the said Sir Hugh, his heirs and assignees for the said whole lands and barony. And also has united the lands respectively above-specified and feu ferms thereof given in warrandice in manner foresaid in a free tenancy and ordains a sasine to be taken thereof upon the ground of any part of the lands respectively foresaid to be sufficient sasine for the whole, notwithstanding the same lies apart and are of diverse baronies. The said lands and barony of Cousland principally conveyed to be held by the said Sir Hugh and his foresaids of our sovereign lord and his successors in free blench, free barony, fee and heritage for ever, and the said lands of Largo, Ardeth and Rathillet, with their pertinents and feu ferms thereof above-specified, to be held likewise in fee and heritage, and that the said infeftment contain all privileges and liberties pertaining to a free barony in most ample form, for yearly payment for the said barony and tenancy of a silver penny at the feast of Whitsunday [May/June] in name of blench ferm, if it be asked only, and that the said infeftment be completed in due form with extension of all clauses needful, ordaining his highness's great seal and the seals of the lords of his parliament to be appended thereto. Which infeftment, with the sasine to follow thereupon, his majesty, with advice and consent foresaid, now as if the same were made and granted and then as now, ratifies and approves in all heads, clauses, articles, provisions and conditions thereof, and finds and declares that the changing of the old holding of the said town, lands and barony of Cousland, with their pertinents above-specified, principally conveyed as said is from ward to blench, together with the disposition of the other lands respectively above-mentioned and feu ferms thereof in warrandice of the same, to be held in like manner by him in free blench ferm as said is, is well and lawfully done by his majesty with the mature advice and deliberation of the estates of parliament for the said great, evident and reasonable causes to the realm and that the same is and shall be in all time coming good, valid and effectual rights to the said Sir Hugh, his heirs and assignees above-written for possessing and enjoying of the lands and others above-specified principal and warrandice in free blench, notwithstanding that the same town, lands and barony of Cousland principally conveyed as said is were held by service of ward and relief of before, and notwithstanding the said lands and others given in warrandice thereof were his highness's annexed property, and notwithstanding of whatsoever acts of annexation thereof to the crown made by his highness or any of his predecessors or any clause or condition thereof or of whatsoever other acts, laws or constitutions made or to be made in the contrary, forbidding the changing of ward holding in blench and all kind of dispositions of the king's property otherwise than in feu ferm, and with augmentation of the rental or disposition in feu of the feu ferms; with the which acts and every one of them and all others which may any way prejudice or derogate the said infeftment held therein contained both of the principal and warrandice or any other clauses, liberties, privileges, provisions and conditions specified therein, his majesty and estates foresaid expressly dispense and make full derogation to the same in so far as may be extended in any way to the said lands and others respectively above-rehearsed, both principal and warrandice, to the effect the said Sir Hugh, his heirs and assignees may peaceably hold, enjoy and possess all and whole the said town, lands and barony of Cousland and others respectively above-specified, principal and warrandice, after the form and tenor of his said infeftment to be made to him thereupon, without any revocation, contradiction or recalling whatsoever.

  1. NAS, PA2/16, f.2r. Back
  2. NAS, PA2/16, f.3r-7r. Back
  3. 'Ditty' written in margin, in contemporary hand. Back
  4. APS interpolation. Back
  5. 'Parthie' in mss. Back
  6. A contemporary comment in the margin refers to the 'ditty' against Alexander Ruthven. Back
  7. APS interpolation. Back
  8. 'Colin' written in superscript above 'Patrick', the latter name having been crossed out. All modifications written in contemporary hand. Back
  9. NAS, PA2/16, f.7r-11v. Back
  10. This must be the battering ram referred to in the second Latin summons at 1600/11/8 above. Back
  11. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, apparently so called because it was designed to be worn concealed under the outer clothes. Back
  12. Defined in DSL as a sleeve consisting of or reinforced by plate-armour. Back
  13. Word unclear. Back
  14. The following last 9 lines of NAS, PA2/16, f.8v are difficult to read due to smudging. Back
  15. Defined in DSL as a kind of close-fitting metal defensive headpiece, a metal skull-cap, commonly worn under a bonnet or other fabric covering. Common in the 16th century. Back
  16. At the bottom of NAS, PA2/16, f.9v there is a dark mark on the left of the folio that obscures the contents. Back
  17. Sections of text in NAS, PA2/16, f.10r-v are obscured by blotting. Back
  18. Sic. 'Hay' in 1600/11/8 above. Back
  19. Some this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  20. Some of this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  21. The last 12 lines of NAS PA2/16, f.11r (the following two and a half paragraphs) are obscured by a large blot. Back
  22. 'Alexander' scored out in APS. Back
  23. NAS, PA2/16, f.11v-12r.
    Text of act obscured by large blots.
    Back
  24. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r. Some of text obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  25. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  26. APS interpolation. Back
  27. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r-v. Much of this act is obscured by a blot in the folio. Back
  28. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  29. NAS, PA2/16, f.12v-13v. Back
  30. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  31. Word unclear. Back
  32. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  33. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  34. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  35. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  36. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v-15r. Back
  37. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  38. NAS, PA2/16, f.15r-v. Back
  39. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  40. NAS, PA2/16, f.16r-v. Back
  41. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  42. Possibly Spoutwells, Tayside. Back
  43. Blank spaces denote 2 deleted words, which are illegible. Back
  44. NAS, PA2/16, f.16v-17v. Bottom right hand corner of f.17r. is torn off, and consequently the left hand side of f.17v. Back
  45. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  46. 'and that the' superscript in contemporary hand. Back
  47. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  48. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  49. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  50. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  51. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  52. NAS, PA2/16, f.17v-19r. Back
  53. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  54. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  55. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  56. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  57. Word unclear. Back
  58. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  59. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  60. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  61. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  62. This act is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/68. Back
  63. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Mss returns to usual hand. Back
  64. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  65. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  66. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  67. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  68. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  69. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v-20r. Back
  70. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  71. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r. Back
  72. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  73. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r-v. Back
  74. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  75. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  76. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  77. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  78. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  79. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  80. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  81. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  82. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  83. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  84. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  85. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  86. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  87. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  88. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  89. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  90. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  91. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  92. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  93. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r-v. Back
  94. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v. Back
  95. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  96. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v-22r. Back
  97. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  98. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r. Back
  99. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  100. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r-v. Back
  101. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  102. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v. Back
  103. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  104. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v-23r. Back
  105. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  106. Followed by a partly illegible deleted word, perhaps 'estate'? Back
  107. NAS, PA2/16, f.23r-v. Back
  108. 'P' printed in margin beside heading. Back
  109. NAS, PA2/16, f.23v-24r. Back
  110. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  111. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r. Back
  112. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  113. Uncertain meaning. Back
  114. Defined in DSL as 'The name of a water-fowl, wintering in Orkney and Shetland, and variously described as a variety of the teal, the pochard and the widgeon'. Back
  115. According to DSL, 'Origin and precise application obscure: the name of some (apparently aquatic) bird ... the guillemot or the razorbill, ? from the cries'. Back
  116. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r-v. Back
  117. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  118. NAS, PA2/16, f.24v-25r. Back
  119. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  120. NAS, PA2/16, f.25r-v. Back
  121. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  122. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  123. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  124. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  125. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  126. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, with or without sleeves, usually of leather lined or padded, and in the 16th century sometimes iron-plated or faced with mail. Back
  127. NAS, PA2/16, f.26r-27r. Back
  128. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  129. 'March' crossed out. Back
  130. NAS, PA2/16, f.27r-v. Back
  131. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  132. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v. Back
  133. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  134. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v-28r. Back
  135. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  136. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  137. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  138. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  139. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  140. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v. Back
  141. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  142. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v-29r. Back
  143. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  144. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  145. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  146. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  147. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  148. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  149. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  150. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r-v. Back
  151. 'V' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  152. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v. Back
  153. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  154. NAS, PA2/16, f.29v. Back
  155. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  156. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v-30r. Back
  157. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  158. NAS, PA2/16, f.30r-32r. Back
  159. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  160. The text of this act, not including the title heading, is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/22. Back
  161. NAS, PA2/16, f.32r-34v. Back
  162. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  163. 'portioner' scored out and replaced with 'feu farmer'. Back
  164. Inserted in superscript. Back
  165. Inserted in superscript. Back
  166. Followed by a deleted and illegible word. Back
  167. NAS, PA2/16, f.34v-35r. Back
  168. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  169. 'never' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  170. 'out' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  171. NAS, PA2/16, f.35v - blank folio page. Back
Act in favour of the vassals of the earldom of Gowrie

Our sovereign lord and whole estates of this present parliament, remembering the godly and notable act made in his majesty's parliament held at Stirling in the month of August 1571 in favour of his highness's true and faithful subjects for possessing of their lands, heritages, annualrents, life rents, pensions or possessions whatsoever held of any persons called and forfeited in the said parliament, notwithstanding the forfeiting of their superiors thereof; and his highness now being willing and fully resolved to renew the foresaid act and to grant the benefit and favour therein contained to all his faithful and true subjects who, or their predecessors to whom they are heirs or the last apparent heirs albeit as yet not entered, held lands, heritages, annualrents, life rents, mills, woods, fishings or other possessions whatsoever of the late John [Ruthven], sometime earl of Gowrie, or any of his predecessors; therefore our said sovereign lord, with advice of the said estates and whole body of this present parliament, statutes, ordains and declares that all his highness's faithful and true subjects, their heirs and successors being in no way culpable of the abominable and horrible crimes of treason and lese-majesty attempted by the said late John, sometime earl of Gowrie, against his grace's most noble person shall hold, enjoy and possess all their lands, heritages, woods, mills, fishings, annualrents, life rents, tacks, rentals and possessions whatsoever held by them or their predecessors of the said late John, sometime earl of Gowrie, or his predecessors, and hold the same of our said sovereign lord, his highness's successors and others, their next immediate superiors, their heirs and successors, according to their infeftments, rights and securities thereof in all points, in the same way and as freely in all respects as if the process and doom of forfeiture had never been led, deduced nor pronounced against the said late John, sometime earl of Gowrie, in this present parliament, and also notwithstanding of the act made in his highness's parliament held at Edinburgh, 8 June 1594, annulling the acts of parliament made in favour of vassals of persons forfeited, to the which act and all other acts, statutes or constitutions made at any time of before and made or to be made in this present parliament, this act makes and shall make full derogation; and that in favour only of the said persons who, or their predecessors, held lands, heritages and others foresaid of the said late John, sometime earl of Gowrie, or his predecessors as said is, the foresaid vassals and each one of them paying to his majesty and his successors or any others their next immediate superiors for each twenty shilling land which they held of before of the Earl of Gowrie £10 money of this realm between now and Whitsunday [May/June] next for composition.

  1. NAS, PA2/16, f.2r. Back
  2. NAS, PA2/16, f.3r-7r. Back
  3. 'Ditty' written in margin, in contemporary hand. Back
  4. APS interpolation. Back
  5. 'Parthie' in mss. Back
  6. A contemporary comment in the margin refers to the 'ditty' against Alexander Ruthven. Back
  7. APS interpolation. Back
  8. 'Colin' written in superscript above 'Patrick', the latter name having been crossed out. All modifications written in contemporary hand. Back
  9. NAS, PA2/16, f.7r-11v. Back
  10. This must be the battering ram referred to in the second Latin summons at 1600/11/8 above. Back
  11. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, apparently so called because it was designed to be worn concealed under the outer clothes. Back
  12. Defined in DSL as a sleeve consisting of or reinforced by plate-armour. Back
  13. Word unclear. Back
  14. The following last 9 lines of NAS, PA2/16, f.8v are difficult to read due to smudging. Back
  15. Defined in DSL as a kind of close-fitting metal defensive headpiece, a metal skull-cap, commonly worn under a bonnet or other fabric covering. Common in the 16th century. Back
  16. At the bottom of NAS, PA2/16, f.9v there is a dark mark on the left of the folio that obscures the contents. Back
  17. Sections of text in NAS, PA2/16, f.10r-v are obscured by blotting. Back
  18. Sic. 'Hay' in 1600/11/8 above. Back
  19. Some this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  20. Some of this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  21. The last 12 lines of NAS PA2/16, f.11r (the following two and a half paragraphs) are obscured by a large blot. Back
  22. 'Alexander' scored out in APS. Back
  23. NAS, PA2/16, f.11v-12r.
    Text of act obscured by large blots.
    Back
  24. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r. Some of text obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  25. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  26. APS interpolation. Back
  27. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r-v. Much of this act is obscured by a blot in the folio. Back
  28. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  29. NAS, PA2/16, f.12v-13v. Back
  30. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  31. Word unclear. Back
  32. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  33. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  34. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  35. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  36. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v-15r. Back
  37. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  38. NAS, PA2/16, f.15r-v. Back
  39. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  40. NAS, PA2/16, f.16r-v. Back
  41. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  42. Possibly Spoutwells, Tayside. Back
  43. Blank spaces denote 2 deleted words, which are illegible. Back
  44. NAS, PA2/16, f.16v-17v. Bottom right hand corner of f.17r. is torn off, and consequently the left hand side of f.17v. Back
  45. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  46. 'and that the' superscript in contemporary hand. Back
  47. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  48. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  49. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  50. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  51. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  52. NAS, PA2/16, f.17v-19r. Back
  53. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  54. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  55. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  56. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  57. Word unclear. Back
  58. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  59. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  60. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  61. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  62. This act is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/68. Back
  63. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Mss returns to usual hand. Back
  64. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  65. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  66. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  67. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  68. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  69. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v-20r. Back
  70. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  71. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r. Back
  72. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  73. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r-v. Back
  74. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  75. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  76. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  77. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  78. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  79. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  80. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  81. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  82. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  83. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  84. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  85. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  86. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  87. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  88. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  89. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  90. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  91. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  92. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  93. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r-v. Back
  94. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v. Back
  95. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  96. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v-22r. Back
  97. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  98. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r. Back
  99. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  100. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r-v. Back
  101. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  102. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v. Back
  103. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  104. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v-23r. Back
  105. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  106. Followed by a partly illegible deleted word, perhaps 'estate'? Back
  107. NAS, PA2/16, f.23r-v. Back
  108. 'P' printed in margin beside heading. Back
  109. NAS, PA2/16, f.23v-24r. Back
  110. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  111. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r. Back
  112. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  113. Uncertain meaning. Back
  114. Defined in DSL as 'The name of a water-fowl, wintering in Orkney and Shetland, and variously described as a variety of the teal, the pochard and the widgeon'. Back
  115. According to DSL, 'Origin and precise application obscure: the name of some (apparently aquatic) bird ... the guillemot or the razorbill, ? from the cries'. Back
  116. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r-v. Back
  117. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  118. NAS, PA2/16, f.24v-25r. Back
  119. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  120. NAS, PA2/16, f.25r-v. Back
  121. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  122. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  123. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  124. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  125. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  126. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, with or without sleeves, usually of leather lined or padded, and in the 16th century sometimes iron-plated or faced with mail. Back
  127. NAS, PA2/16, f.26r-27r. Back
  128. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  129. 'March' crossed out. Back
  130. NAS, PA2/16, f.27r-v. Back
  131. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  132. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v. Back
  133. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  134. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v-28r. Back
  135. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  136. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  137. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  138. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  139. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  140. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v. Back
  141. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  142. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v-29r. Back
  143. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  144. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  145. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  146. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  147. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  148. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  149. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  150. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r-v. Back
  151. 'V' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  152. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v. Back
  153. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  154. NAS, PA2/16, f.29v. Back
  155. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  156. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v-30r. Back
  157. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  158. NAS, PA2/16, f.30r-32r. Back
  159. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  160. The text of this act, not including the title heading, is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/22. Back
  161. NAS, PA2/16, f.32r-34v. Back
  162. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  163. 'portioner' scored out and replaced with 'feu farmer'. Back
  164. Inserted in superscript. Back
  165. Inserted in superscript. Back
  166. Followed by a deleted and illegible word. Back
  167. NAS, PA2/16, f.34v-35r. Back
  168. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  169. 'never' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  170. 'out' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  171. NAS, PA2/16, f.35v - blank folio page. Back
Act in favour of James Lundie

Our sovereign lord and estates of this present parliament, understanding that Robert Jossie, merchant burgess of Edinburgh, was due to James Lundie, brother-german to John Lundie of that Ilk, in the sum of 3,000 merks usual money of this realm, and also that Christian Ruthven, spouse to the said James Lundie, was infeft by the late John [Ruthven], earl of Gowrie, in all and whole an annualrent of 200 merks yearly to be uplifted out of the lands of Culgask under reversion of the sum of 2,000 merks, of the which sums our said sovereign lord is most willing that the said James receive payment and satisfaction according to his majesty's promises made to him of before; therefore, his highness and estates of this present parliament decree and declare that it shall be permissible to his highness, with advice of [Sir David Murray of Gospertie], comptroller, to convey and wadset 500 merks of yearly annualrent out of any part of his majesty's proper lands now annexed to the crown to the said James Lundie, his heirs and assignees and decree and declare the said wadset and alienation to be lawful, good and sufficient right to the said James Lundie to intromit with, hold and possess the said annualrent yearly according to the order of wadsets until the said annualrent be lawfully redeemed by payment of the said sum of 5,000 merks by his highness or his successors to the said James Lundie and his foresaids, notwithstanding the acts of annexation annexing the same lands out of the which the said annualrent should be uplifted to the crown, acts of parliament or statutes whatsoever that may any way derogate or be prejudicial to the foresaid infeftment to be granted of the foresaid annualrent, with the which annexation, acts and statutes our sovereign lord and estates dispense for ever.

  1. NAS, PA2/16, f.2r. Back
  2. NAS, PA2/16, f.3r-7r. Back
  3. 'Ditty' written in margin, in contemporary hand. Back
  4. APS interpolation. Back
  5. 'Parthie' in mss. Back
  6. A contemporary comment in the margin refers to the 'ditty' against Alexander Ruthven. Back
  7. APS interpolation. Back
  8. 'Colin' written in superscript above 'Patrick', the latter name having been crossed out. All modifications written in contemporary hand. Back
  9. NAS, PA2/16, f.7r-11v. Back
  10. This must be the battering ram referred to in the second Latin summons at 1600/11/8 above. Back
  11. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, apparently so called because it was designed to be worn concealed under the outer clothes. Back
  12. Defined in DSL as a sleeve consisting of or reinforced by plate-armour. Back
  13. Word unclear. Back
  14. The following last 9 lines of NAS, PA2/16, f.8v are difficult to read due to smudging. Back
  15. Defined in DSL as a kind of close-fitting metal defensive headpiece, a metal skull-cap, commonly worn under a bonnet or other fabric covering. Common in the 16th century. Back
  16. At the bottom of NAS, PA2/16, f.9v there is a dark mark on the left of the folio that obscures the contents. Back
  17. Sections of text in NAS, PA2/16, f.10r-v are obscured by blotting. Back
  18. Sic. 'Hay' in 1600/11/8 above. Back
  19. Some this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  20. Some of this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  21. The last 12 lines of NAS PA2/16, f.11r (the following two and a half paragraphs) are obscured by a large blot. Back
  22. 'Alexander' scored out in APS. Back
  23. NAS, PA2/16, f.11v-12r.
    Text of act obscured by large blots.
    Back
  24. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r. Some of text obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  25. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  26. APS interpolation. Back
  27. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r-v. Much of this act is obscured by a blot in the folio. Back
  28. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  29. NAS, PA2/16, f.12v-13v. Back
  30. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  31. Word unclear. Back
  32. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  33. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  34. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  35. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  36. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v-15r. Back
  37. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  38. NAS, PA2/16, f.15r-v. Back
  39. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  40. NAS, PA2/16, f.16r-v. Back
  41. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  42. Possibly Spoutwells, Tayside. Back
  43. Blank spaces denote 2 deleted words, which are illegible. Back
  44. NAS, PA2/16, f.16v-17v. Bottom right hand corner of f.17r. is torn off, and consequently the left hand side of f.17v. Back
  45. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  46. 'and that the' superscript in contemporary hand. Back
  47. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  48. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  49. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  50. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  51. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  52. NAS, PA2/16, f.17v-19r. Back
  53. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  54. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  55. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  56. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  57. Word unclear. Back
  58. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  59. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  60. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  61. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  62. This act is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/68. Back
  63. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Mss returns to usual hand. Back
  64. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  65. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  66. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  67. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  68. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  69. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v-20r. Back
  70. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  71. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r. Back
  72. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  73. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r-v. Back
  74. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  75. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  76. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  77. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  78. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  79. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  80. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  81. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  82. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  83. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  84. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  85. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  86. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  87. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  88. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  89. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  90. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  91. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  92. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  93. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r-v. Back
  94. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v. Back
  95. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  96. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v-22r. Back
  97. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  98. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r. Back
  99. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  100. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r-v. Back
  101. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  102. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v. Back
  103. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  104. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v-23r. Back
  105. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  106. Followed by a partly illegible deleted word, perhaps 'estate'? Back
  107. NAS, PA2/16, f.23r-v. Back
  108. 'P' printed in margin beside heading. Back
  109. NAS, PA2/16, f.23v-24r. Back
  110. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  111. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r. Back
  112. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  113. Uncertain meaning. Back
  114. Defined in DSL as 'The name of a water-fowl, wintering in Orkney and Shetland, and variously described as a variety of the teal, the pochard and the widgeon'. Back
  115. According to DSL, 'Origin and precise application obscure: the name of some (apparently aquatic) bird ... the guillemot or the razorbill, ? from the cries'. Back
  116. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r-v. Back
  117. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  118. NAS, PA2/16, f.24v-25r. Back
  119. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  120. NAS, PA2/16, f.25r-v. Back
  121. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  122. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  123. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  124. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  125. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  126. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, with or without sleeves, usually of leather lined or padded, and in the 16th century sometimes iron-plated or faced with mail. Back
  127. NAS, PA2/16, f.26r-27r. Back
  128. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  129. 'March' crossed out. Back
  130. NAS, PA2/16, f.27r-v. Back
  131. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  132. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v. Back
  133. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  134. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v-28r. Back
  135. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  136. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  137. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  138. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  139. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  140. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v. Back
  141. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  142. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v-29r. Back
  143. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  144. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  145. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  146. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  147. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  148. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  149. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  150. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r-v. Back
  151. 'V' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  152. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v. Back
  153. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  154. NAS, PA2/16, f.29v. Back
  155. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  156. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v-30r. Back
  157. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  158. NAS, PA2/16, f.30r-32r. Back
  159. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  160. The text of this act, not including the title heading, is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/22. Back
  161. NAS, PA2/16, f.32r-34v. Back
  162. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  163. 'portioner' scored out and replaced with 'feu farmer'. Back
  164. Inserted in superscript. Back
  165. Inserted in superscript. Back
  166. Followed by a deleted and illegible word. Back
  167. NAS, PA2/16, f.34v-35r. Back
  168. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  169. 'never' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  170. 'out' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  171. NAS, PA2/16, f.35v - blank folio page. Back
Legislation
Regarding invading and pursuing of councillors

Our sovereign lord and estates of this present parliament, understanding that diverse of the lords of his highness's secret council and session and others of his highness's officers for the discharge of their bound duty in his highness's service incur the hatred, indignation, malice and hostility of sundry persons and often accuse them without any just cause, therefore statute and ordain that whatsoever person in time coming invades or pursues any of his highness's session, secret council or others of his highness's officers, it being verified and tried that any of the said councillors, sessioners and officers was pursued and invaded for doing of his highness's service, shall be punished to the death.

  1. NAS, PA2/16, f.2r. Back
  2. NAS, PA2/16, f.3r-7r. Back
  3. 'Ditty' written in margin, in contemporary hand. Back
  4. APS interpolation. Back
  5. 'Parthie' in mss. Back
  6. A contemporary comment in the margin refers to the 'ditty' against Alexander Ruthven. Back
  7. APS interpolation. Back
  8. 'Colin' written in superscript above 'Patrick', the latter name having been crossed out. All modifications written in contemporary hand. Back
  9. NAS, PA2/16, f.7r-11v. Back
  10. This must be the battering ram referred to in the second Latin summons at 1600/11/8 above. Back
  11. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, apparently so called because it was designed to be worn concealed under the outer clothes. Back
  12. Defined in DSL as a sleeve consisting of or reinforced by plate-armour. Back
  13. Word unclear. Back
  14. The following last 9 lines of NAS, PA2/16, f.8v are difficult to read due to smudging. Back
  15. Defined in DSL as a kind of close-fitting metal defensive headpiece, a metal skull-cap, commonly worn under a bonnet or other fabric covering. Common in the 16th century. Back
  16. At the bottom of NAS, PA2/16, f.9v there is a dark mark on the left of the folio that obscures the contents. Back
  17. Sections of text in NAS, PA2/16, f.10r-v are obscured by blotting. Back
  18. Sic. 'Hay' in 1600/11/8 above. Back
  19. Some this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  20. Some of this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  21. The last 12 lines of NAS PA2/16, f.11r (the following two and a half paragraphs) are obscured by a large blot. Back
  22. 'Alexander' scored out in APS. Back
  23. NAS, PA2/16, f.11v-12r.
    Text of act obscured by large blots.
    Back
  24. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r. Some of text obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  25. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  26. APS interpolation. Back
  27. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r-v. Much of this act is obscured by a blot in the folio. Back
  28. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  29. NAS, PA2/16, f.12v-13v. Back
  30. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  31. Word unclear. Back
  32. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  33. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  34. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  35. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  36. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v-15r. Back
  37. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  38. NAS, PA2/16, f.15r-v. Back
  39. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  40. NAS, PA2/16, f.16r-v. Back
  41. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  42. Possibly Spoutwells, Tayside. Back
  43. Blank spaces denote 2 deleted words, which are illegible. Back
  44. NAS, PA2/16, f.16v-17v. Bottom right hand corner of f.17r. is torn off, and consequently the left hand side of f.17v. Back
  45. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  46. 'and that the' superscript in contemporary hand. Back
  47. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  48. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  49. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  50. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  51. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  52. NAS, PA2/16, f.17v-19r. Back
  53. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  54. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  55. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  56. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  57. Word unclear. Back
  58. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  59. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  60. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  61. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  62. This act is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/68. Back
  63. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Mss returns to usual hand. Back
  64. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  65. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  66. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  67. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  68. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  69. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v-20r. Back
  70. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  71. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r. Back
  72. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  73. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r-v. Back
  74. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  75. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  76. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  77. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  78. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  79. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  80. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  81. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  82. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  83. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  84. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  85. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  86. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  87. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  88. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  89. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  90. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  91. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  92. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  93. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r-v. Back
  94. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v. Back
  95. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  96. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v-22r. Back
  97. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  98. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r. Back
  99. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  100. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r-v. Back
  101. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  102. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v. Back
  103. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  104. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v-23r. Back
  105. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  106. Followed by a partly illegible deleted word, perhaps 'estate'? Back
  107. NAS, PA2/16, f.23r-v. Back
  108. 'P' printed in margin beside heading. Back
  109. NAS, PA2/16, f.23v-24r. Back
  110. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  111. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r. Back
  112. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  113. Uncertain meaning. Back
  114. Defined in DSL as 'The name of a water-fowl, wintering in Orkney and Shetland, and variously described as a variety of the teal, the pochard and the widgeon'. Back
  115. According to DSL, 'Origin and precise application obscure: the name of some (apparently aquatic) bird ... the guillemot or the razorbill, ? from the cries'. Back
  116. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r-v. Back
  117. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  118. NAS, PA2/16, f.24v-25r. Back
  119. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  120. NAS, PA2/16, f.25r-v. Back
  121. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  122. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  123. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  124. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  125. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  126. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, with or without sleeves, usually of leather lined or padded, and in the 16th century sometimes iron-plated or faced with mail. Back
  127. NAS, PA2/16, f.26r-27r. Back
  128. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  129. 'March' crossed out. Back
  130. NAS, PA2/16, f.27r-v. Back
  131. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  132. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v. Back
  133. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  134. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v-28r. Back
  135. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  136. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  137. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  138. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  139. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  140. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v. Back
  141. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  142. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v-29r. Back
  143. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  144. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  145. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  146. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  147. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  148. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  149. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  150. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r-v. Back
  151. 'V' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  152. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v. Back
  153. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  154. NAS, PA2/16, f.29v. Back
  155. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  156. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v-30r. Back
  157. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  158. NAS, PA2/16, f.30r-32r. Back
  159. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  160. The text of this act, not including the title heading, is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/22. Back
  161. NAS, PA2/16, f.32r-34v. Back
  162. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  163. 'portioner' scored out and replaced with 'feu farmer'. Back
  164. Inserted in superscript. Back
  165. Inserted in superscript. Back
  166. Followed by a deleted and illegible word. Back
  167. NAS, PA2/16, f.34v-35r. Back
  168. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  169. 'never' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  170. 'out' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  171. NAS, PA2/16, f.35v - blank folio page. Back
Regarding purpresture in the king's commonties

Our sovereign lord and estates of this present parliament, considering that his highness and his highness's predecessors, for the help and relief of his poor commons in diverse parts of this realm, have reserved great quantity of muirs and other common lands in no way conveyed in property to any particular person, notwithstanding whereof diverse persons have ploughed, enclosed, tilled, sown and laboured great portions of the same commonties, without any right of property competent to them, to the prejudice of his highness and utter wrack of the poor tenants and commons of this realm, therefore statute and ordain that all persons who have tilled, laboured, sown, fenced, enclosed or appropriated any part or portion of his majesty's common muirs or other commonties belonging to his highness within the memory of man, the same being tried either by way of molestation or by the lords of the session, that they within a year and a day after the said trial return the same commonties again to the effect the same may remain unlaboured or enclosed in any time thereafter but to remain as commonty likewise and in the same manner as it was before the ploughing or fencing thereof; and if they fail to do the same within the space foresaid, lawful trial being taken therein as said is, they shall be discerned to have committed purpresture. And also our sovereign lord and estates foresaid statute and ordain that whosoever in time coming shall till, labour, manure, sow, park, enclose or appropriate any part or portion of his majesty's common muirs or other of his highness's commonties (the same being sufficiently tried in manner foresaid) shall be also discerned to have committed purpresture and punished for that according to the laws, use and customs of this realm observed of old in matters of purpresture.

  1. NAS, PA2/16, f.2r. Back
  2. NAS, PA2/16, f.3r-7r. Back
  3. 'Ditty' written in margin, in contemporary hand. Back
  4. APS interpolation. Back
  5. 'Parthie' in mss. Back
  6. A contemporary comment in the margin refers to the 'ditty' against Alexander Ruthven. Back
  7. APS interpolation. Back
  8. 'Colin' written in superscript above 'Patrick', the latter name having been crossed out. All modifications written in contemporary hand. Back
  9. NAS, PA2/16, f.7r-11v. Back
  10. This must be the battering ram referred to in the second Latin summons at 1600/11/8 above. Back
  11. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, apparently so called because it was designed to be worn concealed under the outer clothes. Back
  12. Defined in DSL as a sleeve consisting of or reinforced by plate-armour. Back
  13. Word unclear. Back
  14. The following last 9 lines of NAS, PA2/16, f.8v are difficult to read due to smudging. Back
  15. Defined in DSL as a kind of close-fitting metal defensive headpiece, a metal skull-cap, commonly worn under a bonnet or other fabric covering. Common in the 16th century. Back
  16. At the bottom of NAS, PA2/16, f.9v there is a dark mark on the left of the folio that obscures the contents. Back
  17. Sections of text in NAS, PA2/16, f.10r-v are obscured by blotting. Back
  18. Sic. 'Hay' in 1600/11/8 above. Back
  19. Some this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  20. Some of this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  21. The last 12 lines of NAS PA2/16, f.11r (the following two and a half paragraphs) are obscured by a large blot. Back
  22. 'Alexander' scored out in APS. Back
  23. NAS, PA2/16, f.11v-12r.
    Text of act obscured by large blots.
    Back
  24. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r. Some of text obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  25. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  26. APS interpolation. Back
  27. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r-v. Much of this act is obscured by a blot in the folio. Back
  28. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  29. NAS, PA2/16, f.12v-13v. Back
  30. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  31. Word unclear. Back
  32. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  33. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  34. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  35. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  36. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v-15r. Back
  37. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  38. NAS, PA2/16, f.15r-v. Back
  39. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  40. NAS, PA2/16, f.16r-v. Back
  41. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  42. Possibly Spoutwells, Tayside. Back
  43. Blank spaces denote 2 deleted words, which are illegible. Back
  44. NAS, PA2/16, f.16v-17v. Bottom right hand corner of f.17r. is torn off, and consequently the left hand side of f.17v. Back
  45. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  46. 'and that the' superscript in contemporary hand. Back
  47. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  48. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  49. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  50. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  51. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  52. NAS, PA2/16, f.17v-19r. Back
  53. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  54. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  55. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  56. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  57. Word unclear. Back
  58. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  59. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  60. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  61. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  62. This act is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/68. Back
  63. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Mss returns to usual hand. Back
  64. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  65. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  66. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  67. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  68. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  69. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v-20r. Back
  70. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  71. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r. Back
  72. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  73. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r-v. Back
  74. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  75. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  76. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  77. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  78. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  79. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  80. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  81. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  82. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  83. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  84. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  85. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  86. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  87. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  88. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  89. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  90. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  91. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  92. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  93. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r-v. Back
  94. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v. Back
  95. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  96. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v-22r. Back
  97. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  98. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r. Back
  99. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  100. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r-v. Back
  101. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  102. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v. Back
  103. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  104. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v-23r. Back
  105. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  106. Followed by a partly illegible deleted word, perhaps 'estate'? Back
  107. NAS, PA2/16, f.23r-v. Back
  108. 'P' printed in margin beside heading. Back
  109. NAS, PA2/16, f.23v-24r. Back
  110. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  111. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r. Back
  112. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  113. Uncertain meaning. Back
  114. Defined in DSL as 'The name of a water-fowl, wintering in Orkney and Shetland, and variously described as a variety of the teal, the pochard and the widgeon'. Back
  115. According to DSL, 'Origin and precise application obscure: the name of some (apparently aquatic) bird ... the guillemot or the razorbill, ? from the cries'. Back
  116. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r-v. Back
  117. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  118. NAS, PA2/16, f.24v-25r. Back
  119. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  120. NAS, PA2/16, f.25r-v. Back
  121. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  122. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  123. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  124. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  125. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  126. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, with or without sleeves, usually of leather lined or padded, and in the 16th century sometimes iron-plated or faced with mail. Back
  127. NAS, PA2/16, f.26r-27r. Back
  128. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  129. 'March' crossed out. Back
  130. NAS, PA2/16, f.27r-v. Back
  131. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  132. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v. Back
  133. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  134. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v-28r. Back
  135. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  136. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  137. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  138. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  139. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  140. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v. Back
  141. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  142. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v-29r. Back
  143. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  144. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  145. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  146. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  147. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  148. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  149. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  150. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r-v. Back
  151. 'V' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  152. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v. Back
  153. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  154. NAS, PA2/16, f.29v. Back
  155. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  156. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v-30r. Back
  157. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  158. NAS, PA2/16, f.30r-32r. Back
  159. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  160. The text of this act, not including the title heading, is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/22. Back
  161. NAS, PA2/16, f.32r-34v. Back
  162. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  163. 'portioner' scored out and replaced with 'feu farmer'. Back
  164. Inserted in superscript. Back
  165. Inserted in superscript. Back
  166. Followed by a deleted and illegible word. Back
  167. NAS, PA2/16, f.34v-35r. Back
  168. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  169. 'never' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  170. 'out' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  171. NAS, PA2/16, f.35v - blank folio page. Back
Regarding bearers and shooters with hackbuts and pistols

Our sovereign lord, understanding that calling and pursuing of bearers, wearers and shooters with hackbuts and pistols and other firearms before his justice and his deputes breed such trouble to parties and assizers and such difficulty in the trial that often innocent persons are thereby vexed, and such as are guilty eschew their due punishment by declining of the assizers that best know the verity of the fact and other such subterfuges and delays of lawful trial; for remedy whereof his highness, with advice and consent of his estates of parliament, statutes and ordains that the bearers and wearers of hackbuts and pistols and other firearms who have neither committed slaughter nor mutilation or other odious violence therewith, but only borne and worn them upon their persons or in their companies contrary to his highness's laws and acts of parliament, may be either pursued criminally before the justice and his deputes according to the custom heretofore observed, or before his highness and the lords of secret council and lawful probation of witnesses or oath of party at the option of his highness's treasurer or advocate, providing always that such as shall be pursued before his highness and lords of his secret council and tried by probation of witnesses guilty of any of the said crimes shall not incur the corporal punishment prescribed by the former acts by amputation of the right hand, but only to be punished by warding of their persons, escheat of their goods moveable, or payment of such a pecuniary penalty and sum of money as his highness and lords of his secret council shall determine, without prejudice in any way of the execution of the former acts of parliament against such as shall be criminally pursued, convicted and found guilty by a condign assize before his highness's justice general or his deputes foresaid in case his majesty like rather that they be pursued criminally before the justice than before the secret council. And further, his highness and estates foresaid annul and discharge all licences given by his majesty for bearing and wearing hackbuts, pistols and other firearms and statute and ordain that no licences shall be granted in time coming to any persons for bearing and wearing of the same except that the same licences be granted by his highness and lords of secret council sitting in council; and when the same licences are so granted, ordain the same licences to pay composition to his highness's treasurer and to pass his register and to pass the signet and whole seals, and decree and declare all licences not granted in council and which shall not pay composition and pass the signet and whole seals as said is to be null and of no value; and notwithstanding thereof the said persons to be accused according to this present act and acts of parliament made of before.

  1. NAS, PA2/16, f.2r. Back
  2. NAS, PA2/16, f.3r-7r. Back
  3. 'Ditty' written in margin, in contemporary hand. Back
  4. APS interpolation. Back
  5. 'Parthie' in mss. Back
  6. A contemporary comment in the margin refers to the 'ditty' against Alexander Ruthven. Back
  7. APS interpolation. Back
  8. 'Colin' written in superscript above 'Patrick', the latter name having been crossed out. All modifications written in contemporary hand. Back
  9. NAS, PA2/16, f.7r-11v. Back
  10. This must be the battering ram referred to in the second Latin summons at 1600/11/8 above. Back
  11. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, apparently so called because it was designed to be worn concealed under the outer clothes. Back
  12. Defined in DSL as a sleeve consisting of or reinforced by plate-armour. Back
  13. Word unclear. Back
  14. The following last 9 lines of NAS, PA2/16, f.8v are difficult to read due to smudging. Back
  15. Defined in DSL as a kind of close-fitting metal defensive headpiece, a metal skull-cap, commonly worn under a bonnet or other fabric covering. Common in the 16th century. Back
  16. At the bottom of NAS, PA2/16, f.9v there is a dark mark on the left of the folio that obscures the contents. Back
  17. Sections of text in NAS, PA2/16, f.10r-v are obscured by blotting. Back
  18. Sic. 'Hay' in 1600/11/8 above. Back
  19. Some this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  20. Some of this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  21. The last 12 lines of NAS PA2/16, f.11r (the following two and a half paragraphs) are obscured by a large blot. Back
  22. 'Alexander' scored out in APS. Back
  23. NAS, PA2/16, f.11v-12r.
    Text of act obscured by large blots.
    Back
  24. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r. Some of text obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  25. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  26. APS interpolation. Back
  27. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r-v. Much of this act is obscured by a blot in the folio. Back
  28. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  29. NAS, PA2/16, f.12v-13v. Back
  30. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  31. Word unclear. Back
  32. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  33. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  34. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  35. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  36. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v-15r. Back
  37. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  38. NAS, PA2/16, f.15r-v. Back
  39. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  40. NAS, PA2/16, f.16r-v. Back
  41. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  42. Possibly Spoutwells, Tayside. Back
  43. Blank spaces denote 2 deleted words, which are illegible. Back
  44. NAS, PA2/16, f.16v-17v. Bottom right hand corner of f.17r. is torn off, and consequently the left hand side of f.17v. Back
  45. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  46. 'and that the' superscript in contemporary hand. Back
  47. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  48. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  49. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  50. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  51. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  52. NAS, PA2/16, f.17v-19r. Back
  53. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  54. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  55. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  56. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  57. Word unclear. Back
  58. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  59. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  60. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  61. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  62. This act is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/68. Back
  63. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Mss returns to usual hand. Back
  64. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  65. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  66. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  67. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  68. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  69. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v-20r. Back
  70. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  71. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r. Back
  72. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  73. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r-v. Back
  74. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  75. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  76. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  77. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  78. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  79. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  80. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  81. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  82. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  83. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  84. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  85. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  86. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  87. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  88. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  89. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  90. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  91. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  92. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  93. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r-v. Back
  94. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v. Back
  95. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  96. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v-22r. Back
  97. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  98. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r. Back
  99. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  100. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r-v. Back
  101. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  102. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v. Back
  103. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  104. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v-23r. Back
  105. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  106. Followed by a partly illegible deleted word, perhaps 'estate'? Back
  107. NAS, PA2/16, f.23r-v. Back
  108. 'P' printed in margin beside heading. Back
  109. NAS, PA2/16, f.23v-24r. Back
  110. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  111. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r. Back
  112. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  113. Uncertain meaning. Back
  114. Defined in DSL as 'The name of a water-fowl, wintering in Orkney and Shetland, and variously described as a variety of the teal, the pochard and the widgeon'. Back
  115. According to DSL, 'Origin and precise application obscure: the name of some (apparently aquatic) bird ... the guillemot or the razorbill, ? from the cries'. Back
  116. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r-v. Back
  117. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  118. NAS, PA2/16, f.24v-25r. Back
  119. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  120. NAS, PA2/16, f.25r-v. Back
  121. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  122. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  123. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  124. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  125. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  126. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, with or without sleeves, usually of leather lined or padded, and in the 16th century sometimes iron-plated or faced with mail. Back
  127. NAS, PA2/16, f.26r-27r. Back
  128. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  129. 'March' crossed out. Back
  130. NAS, PA2/16, f.27r-v. Back
  131. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  132. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v. Back
  133. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  134. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v-28r. Back
  135. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  136. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  137. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  138. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  139. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  140. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v. Back
  141. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  142. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v-29r. Back
  143. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  144. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  145. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  146. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  147. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  148. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  149. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  150. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r-v. Back
  151. 'V' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  152. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v. Back
  153. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  154. NAS, PA2/16, f.29v. Back
  155. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  156. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v-30r. Back
  157. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  158. NAS, PA2/16, f.30r-32r. Back
  159. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  160. The text of this act, not including the title heading, is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/22. Back
  161. NAS, PA2/16, f.32r-34v. Back
  162. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  163. 'portioner' scored out and replaced with 'feu farmer'. Back
  164. Inserted in superscript. Back
  165. Inserted in superscript. Back
  166. Followed by a deleted and illegible word. Back
  167. NAS, PA2/16, f.34v-35r. Back
  168. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  169. 'never' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  170. 'out' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  171. NAS, PA2/16, f.35v - blank folio page. Back
Explanation of the acts of parliament regarding ocker and usury

Our sovereign lord, with advice and consent of the estates, ratifies and approves the acts of parliament made regarding usury and taking of unlawful annualrent or profit for silver in all points according to the tenor of the same. And because the obscurity of the act of his majesty's 15th parliament, entitled 'It is not permissible to take more annualrent or profit than ten for the hundred', regarding the manner of trial and probation of the said crime by oath of party and all other lawful probation conjoined therewith competent of the law, has bred such difficulty in pursuit and decision of the said cause that justice thereby has been greatly frustrated and the contraveners of the said act altogether unpunished, therefore his majesty, with advice and consent foresaid, statutes and ordains that in all actions already intended, depending or hereafter to be intended against the contraveners of the said acts, litiscontestation being made therein by admitting the summons to probation, it shall be permissible to press the said summons and contravening of the said acts or any of them regarding the taking of unlawful and exorbitant profit for sums of money by writ or oath of party, receiver of the said unlawful profit, and by the witnesses inserted in the security made for the said sums, without receiving of the oath of the party, giver of the said unlawful profit, for eschewing of all occasion of perjury which might be suspected to proceed thereupon.

  1. NAS, PA2/16, f.2r. Back
  2. NAS, PA2/16, f.3r-7r. Back
  3. 'Ditty' written in margin, in contemporary hand. Back
  4. APS interpolation. Back
  5. 'Parthie' in mss. Back
  6. A contemporary comment in the margin refers to the 'ditty' against Alexander Ruthven. Back
  7. APS interpolation. Back
  8. 'Colin' written in superscript above 'Patrick', the latter name having been crossed out. All modifications written in contemporary hand. Back
  9. NAS, PA2/16, f.7r-11v. Back
  10. This must be the battering ram referred to in the second Latin summons at 1600/11/8 above. Back
  11. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, apparently so called because it was designed to be worn concealed under the outer clothes. Back
  12. Defined in DSL as a sleeve consisting of or reinforced by plate-armour. Back
  13. Word unclear. Back
  14. The following last 9 lines of NAS, PA2/16, f.8v are difficult to read due to smudging. Back
  15. Defined in DSL as a kind of close-fitting metal defensive headpiece, a metal skull-cap, commonly worn under a bonnet or other fabric covering. Common in the 16th century. Back
  16. At the bottom of NAS, PA2/16, f.9v there is a dark mark on the left of the folio that obscures the contents. Back
  17. Sections of text in NAS, PA2/16, f.10r-v are obscured by blotting. Back
  18. Sic. 'Hay' in 1600/11/8 above. Back
  19. Some this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  20. Some of this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  21. The last 12 lines of NAS PA2/16, f.11r (the following two and a half paragraphs) are obscured by a large blot. Back
  22. 'Alexander' scored out in APS. Back
  23. NAS, PA2/16, f.11v-12r.
    Text of act obscured by large blots.
    Back
  24. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r. Some of text obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  25. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  26. APS interpolation. Back
  27. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r-v. Much of this act is obscured by a blot in the folio. Back
  28. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  29. NAS, PA2/16, f.12v-13v. Back
  30. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  31. Word unclear. Back
  32. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  33. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  34. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  35. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  36. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v-15r. Back
  37. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  38. NAS, PA2/16, f.15r-v. Back
  39. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  40. NAS, PA2/16, f.16r-v. Back
  41. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  42. Possibly Spoutwells, Tayside. Back
  43. Blank spaces denote 2 deleted words, which are illegible. Back
  44. NAS, PA2/16, f.16v-17v. Bottom right hand corner of f.17r. is torn off, and consequently the left hand side of f.17v. Back
  45. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  46. 'and that the' superscript in contemporary hand. Back
  47. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  48. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  49. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  50. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  51. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  52. NAS, PA2/16, f.17v-19r. Back
  53. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  54. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  55. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  56. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  57. Word unclear. Back
  58. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  59. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  60. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  61. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  62. This act is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/68. Back
  63. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Mss returns to usual hand. Back
  64. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  65. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  66. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  67. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  68. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  69. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v-20r. Back
  70. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  71. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r. Back
  72. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  73. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r-v. Back
  74. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  75. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  76. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  77. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  78. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  79. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  80. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  81. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  82. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  83. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  84. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  85. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  86. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  87. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  88. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  89. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  90. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  91. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  92. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  93. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r-v. Back
  94. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v. Back
  95. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  96. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v-22r. Back
  97. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  98. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r. Back
  99. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  100. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r-v. Back
  101. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  102. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v. Back
  103. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  104. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v-23r. Back
  105. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  106. Followed by a partly illegible deleted word, perhaps 'estate'? Back
  107. NAS, PA2/16, f.23r-v. Back
  108. 'P' printed in margin beside heading. Back
  109. NAS, PA2/16, f.23v-24r. Back
  110. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  111. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r. Back
  112. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  113. Uncertain meaning. Back
  114. Defined in DSL as 'The name of a water-fowl, wintering in Orkney and Shetland, and variously described as a variety of the teal, the pochard and the widgeon'. Back
  115. According to DSL, 'Origin and precise application obscure: the name of some (apparently aquatic) bird ... the guillemot or the razorbill, ? from the cries'. Back
  116. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r-v. Back
  117. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  118. NAS, PA2/16, f.24v-25r. Back
  119. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  120. NAS, PA2/16, f.25r-v. Back
  121. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  122. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  123. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  124. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  125. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  126. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, with or without sleeves, usually of leather lined or padded, and in the 16th century sometimes iron-plated or faced with mail. Back
  127. NAS, PA2/16, f.26r-27r. Back
  128. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  129. 'March' crossed out. Back
  130. NAS, PA2/16, f.27r-v. Back
  131. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  132. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v. Back
  133. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  134. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v-28r. Back
  135. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  136. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  137. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  138. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  139. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  140. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v. Back
  141. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  142. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v-29r. Back
  143. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  144. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  145. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  146. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  147. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  148. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  149. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  150. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r-v. Back
  151. 'V' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  152. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v. Back
  153. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  154. NAS, PA2/16, f.29v. Back
  155. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  156. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v-30r. Back
  157. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  158. NAS, PA2/16, f.30r-32r. Back
  159. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  160. The text of this act, not including the title heading, is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/22. Back
  161. NAS, PA2/16, f.32r-34v. Back
  162. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  163. 'portioner' scored out and replaced with 'feu farmer'. Back
  164. Inserted in superscript. Back
  165. Inserted in superscript. Back
  166. Followed by a deleted and illegible word. Back
  167. NAS, PA2/16, f.34v-35r. Back
  168. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  169. 'never' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  170. 'out' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  171. NAS, PA2/16, f.35v - blank folio page. Back
Regarding dissolution of the coal pits of the property and lands where demolished strengths and castles were built of old

Our sovereign lord, understanding that the ground and bounds where diverse castles, strengths and forts pertaining to his majesty's most noble progenitors were of old situated is now altogether waste, unsightly and unprofitable to his majesty, the said castles and forts being so demolished that there remains no kind of building therein either for strength or dwelling to his majesty, as likewise that his highness's coal pits within the bounds of his annexed property being unable to be wrought without advancement of great expense are so neglected that his majesty neither receives furniture of coals to his highness's house thereby nor any other profit or commodity of the same; for remedy whereof our said sovereign lord, with advice and consent of his estates of parliament, statutes and ordains that it shall be permissible to his highness to set all and sundry the said lands and bounds with the pertinents whereupon any of the said old, demolished and uninhabitable castles and forts were situated, together with the meadows and lochs belonging thereto and coal pits being within the bounds of his annexed property, in feu ferm heritably, so that it be not in diminution of his highness's rental, grassum or other duties, but in augmentation thereof, and to that effect, with consent foresaid, makes present dissolution thereof. And that the lands, meadows, lochs, coal pits and others set by his majesty by virtue of this act in manner foresaid shall stand perpetually and after his decease, the annexations made of before to return again to the own nature so that his successors, after his decease, shall have no further power to transfer nor set in feu any of the said lands, bounds, lochs, meadows, coal pits and others foresaid than they had before the making of this present dissolution. And his highness and estates of parliament declare that the foresaid dissolution shall in no way hurt nor prejudice Alexander [Livingston], lord Livingston, his right which he has to the coal of Bonnington, beside Linlithgow, and to his right which he has to the castle of Blackness, with the greens and pertinents belonging thereto.

  1. NAS, PA2/16, f.2r. Back
  2. NAS, PA2/16, f.3r-7r. Back
  3. 'Ditty' written in margin, in contemporary hand. Back
  4. APS interpolation. Back
  5. 'Parthie' in mss. Back
  6. A contemporary comment in the margin refers to the 'ditty' against Alexander Ruthven. Back
  7. APS interpolation. Back
  8. 'Colin' written in superscript above 'Patrick', the latter name having been crossed out. All modifications written in contemporary hand. Back
  9. NAS, PA2/16, f.7r-11v. Back
  10. This must be the battering ram referred to in the second Latin summons at 1600/11/8 above. Back
  11. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, apparently so called because it was designed to be worn concealed under the outer clothes. Back
  12. Defined in DSL as a sleeve consisting of or reinforced by plate-armour. Back
  13. Word unclear. Back
  14. The following last 9 lines of NAS, PA2/16, f.8v are difficult to read due to smudging. Back
  15. Defined in DSL as a kind of close-fitting metal defensive headpiece, a metal skull-cap, commonly worn under a bonnet or other fabric covering. Common in the 16th century. Back
  16. At the bottom of NAS, PA2/16, f.9v there is a dark mark on the left of the folio that obscures the contents. Back
  17. Sections of text in NAS, PA2/16, f.10r-v are obscured by blotting. Back
  18. Sic. 'Hay' in 1600/11/8 above. Back
  19. Some this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  20. Some of this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  21. The last 12 lines of NAS PA2/16, f.11r (the following two and a half paragraphs) are obscured by a large blot. Back
  22. 'Alexander' scored out in APS. Back
  23. NAS, PA2/16, f.11v-12r.
    Text of act obscured by large blots.
    Back
  24. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r. Some of text obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  25. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  26. APS interpolation. Back
  27. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r-v. Much of this act is obscured by a blot in the folio. Back
  28. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  29. NAS, PA2/16, f.12v-13v. Back
  30. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  31. Word unclear. Back
  32. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  33. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  34. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  35. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  36. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v-15r. Back
  37. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  38. NAS, PA2/16, f.15r-v. Back
  39. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  40. NAS, PA2/16, f.16r-v. Back
  41. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  42. Possibly Spoutwells, Tayside. Back
  43. Blank spaces denote 2 deleted words, which are illegible. Back
  44. NAS, PA2/16, f.16v-17v. Bottom right hand corner of f.17r. is torn off, and consequently the left hand side of f.17v. Back
  45. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  46. 'and that the' superscript in contemporary hand. Back
  47. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  48. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  49. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  50. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  51. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  52. NAS, PA2/16, f.17v-19r. Back
  53. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  54. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  55. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  56. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  57. Word unclear. Back
  58. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  59. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  60. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  61. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  62. This act is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/68. Back
  63. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Mss returns to usual hand. Back
  64. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  65. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  66. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  67. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  68. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  69. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v-20r. Back
  70. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  71. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r. Back
  72. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  73. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r-v. Back
  74. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  75. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  76. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  77. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  78. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  79. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  80. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  81. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  82. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  83. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  84. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  85. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  86. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  87. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  88. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  89. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  90. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  91. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  92. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  93. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r-v. Back
  94. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v. Back
  95. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  96. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v-22r. Back
  97. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  98. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r. Back
  99. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  100. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r-v. Back
  101. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  102. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v. Back
  103. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  104. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v-23r. Back
  105. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  106. Followed by a partly illegible deleted word, perhaps 'estate'? Back
  107. NAS, PA2/16, f.23r-v. Back
  108. 'P' printed in margin beside heading. Back
  109. NAS, PA2/16, f.23v-24r. Back
  110. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  111. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r. Back
  112. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  113. Uncertain meaning. Back
  114. Defined in DSL as 'The name of a water-fowl, wintering in Orkney and Shetland, and variously described as a variety of the teal, the pochard and the widgeon'. Back
  115. According to DSL, 'Origin and precise application obscure: the name of some (apparently aquatic) bird ... the guillemot or the razorbill, ? from the cries'. Back
  116. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r-v. Back
  117. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  118. NAS, PA2/16, f.24v-25r. Back
  119. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  120. NAS, PA2/16, f.25r-v. Back
  121. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  122. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  123. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  124. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  125. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  126. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, with or without sleeves, usually of leather lined or padded, and in the 16th century sometimes iron-plated or faced with mail. Back
  127. NAS, PA2/16, f.26r-27r. Back
  128. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  129. 'March' crossed out. Back
  130. NAS, PA2/16, f.27r-v. Back
  131. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  132. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v. Back
  133. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  134. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v-28r. Back
  135. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  136. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  137. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  138. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  139. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  140. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v. Back
  141. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  142. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v-29r. Back
  143. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  144. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  145. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  146. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  147. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  148. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  149. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  150. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r-v. Back
  151. 'V' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  152. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v. Back
  153. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  154. NAS, PA2/16, f.29v. Back
  155. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  156. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v-30r. Back
  157. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  158. NAS, PA2/16, f.30r-32r. Back
  159. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  160. The text of this act, not including the title heading, is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/22. Back
  161. NAS, PA2/16, f.32r-34v. Back
  162. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  163. 'portioner' scored out and replaced with 'feu farmer'. Back
  164. Inserted in superscript. Back
  165. Inserted in superscript. Back
  166. Followed by a deleted and illegible word. Back
  167. NAS, PA2/16, f.34v-35r. Back
  168. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  169. 'never' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  170. 'out' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  171. NAS, PA2/16, f.35v - blank folio page. Back
Legislation: private act
Regarding the posterity of Francis [Stewart], sometime earl of Bothwell

Our sovereign lord, moved to conceive a vehement suspicion against the posterity of rebels forfeited for their treasons attempted against his majesty's person and estate by the perilous experience of the horrible and desperate treason lately enterprised against his majesty's own life by the late John [Ruthven], earl of Gowrie and the late Master Alexander Ruthven, sons of the late William [Ruthven], earl of Gowrie, who, being infinitely obliged to his highness's clemency in so far as forgetting the many and great treasons committed against his highness by their said late father, of his princely grace and favour, restored them to their same dignity, living and integrity of their former estate, yet being unmindful of so many and great benefits, and following the treasonable example of their said father for revenge of his just and lawful execution to the death for his treasonable demerits, enterprised desperately and vilely to murder his majesty, their native prince; therefore, for preventing of the like occasions, our said sovereign lord, with advice and consent of the estates of this present parliament, statutes and ordains that the bairns and posterity of Francis, sometime earl of Bothwell and James Douglas, sometime of Spott, shall never be able nor capable in any time coming to hold, enjoy or possess any benefices, offices, lands, heritages, tacks, steadings, rooms, possessions, successions, goods or gear, moveable or immoveable, within this realm but that our said sovereign lord by himself and others having his right to the said lands, benefices, offices, goods or gear has and in all time coming shall have full and undoubted right to the same as fully in all respects as the said rebels and their bairns and posterity had or might have had or claimed to the same or any part thereof at any time bygone or to come. And seeing our said sovereign lord has gratified diverse of his most faithful servants who have given best proof of their true affection to his highness's service in resistance, pursuit, banishment or slaughter of the said traitors and their accomplices with the recompenses of their service out of the said forfeited traitors' lands and possessions by heritable infeftments, pensions and otherwise, to the effect his good subjects may be the better encouraged to expose their lives in defence of his royal person and authority and pursuit of his rebels and traitors in time coming, therefore his highness and estates foresaid statute and ordain that if it shall happen hereafter his highness or any of his successors to grant their pardon, grace, remission or restitution to any of the said forfeited rebels or their posterity, heirs or successors foresaid, the same shall in no way be extended to the lands, heritages, benefices, offices, possessions and others pertaining of before to the said rebels, their bairns or posterity and conveyed by his highness to any of his faithful servants in recompense of their good service but that the same shall perpetually remain with them, their heirs and successors as a due recompense for their loyalty, notwithstanding of any grace, pardon, remission or restitution in any way to be granted to the said traitors or any of them in time coming.

  1. NAS, PA2/16, f.2r. Back
  2. NAS, PA2/16, f.3r-7r. Back
  3. 'Ditty' written in margin, in contemporary hand. Back
  4. APS interpolation. Back
  5. 'Parthie' in mss. Back
  6. A contemporary comment in the margin refers to the 'ditty' against Alexander Ruthven. Back
  7. APS interpolation. Back
  8. 'Colin' written in superscript above 'Patrick', the latter name having been crossed out. All modifications written in contemporary hand. Back
  9. NAS, PA2/16, f.7r-11v. Back
  10. This must be the battering ram referred to in the second Latin summons at 1600/11/8 above. Back
  11. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, apparently so called because it was designed to be worn concealed under the outer clothes. Back
  12. Defined in DSL as a sleeve consisting of or reinforced by plate-armour. Back
  13. Word unclear. Back
  14. The following last 9 lines of NAS, PA2/16, f.8v are difficult to read due to smudging. Back
  15. Defined in DSL as a kind of close-fitting metal defensive headpiece, a metal skull-cap, commonly worn under a bonnet or other fabric covering. Common in the 16th century. Back
  16. At the bottom of NAS, PA2/16, f.9v there is a dark mark on the left of the folio that obscures the contents. Back
  17. Sections of text in NAS, PA2/16, f.10r-v are obscured by blotting. Back
  18. Sic. 'Hay' in 1600/11/8 above. Back
  19. Some this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  20. Some of this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  21. The last 12 lines of NAS PA2/16, f.11r (the following two and a half paragraphs) are obscured by a large blot. Back
  22. 'Alexander' scored out in APS. Back
  23. NAS, PA2/16, f.11v-12r.
    Text of act obscured by large blots.
    Back
  24. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r. Some of text obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  25. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  26. APS interpolation. Back
  27. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r-v. Much of this act is obscured by a blot in the folio. Back
  28. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  29. NAS, PA2/16, f.12v-13v. Back
  30. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  31. Word unclear. Back
  32. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  33. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  34. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  35. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  36. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v-15r. Back
  37. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  38. NAS, PA2/16, f.15r-v. Back
  39. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  40. NAS, PA2/16, f.16r-v. Back
  41. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  42. Possibly Spoutwells, Tayside. Back
  43. Blank spaces denote 2 deleted words, which are illegible. Back
  44. NAS, PA2/16, f.16v-17v. Bottom right hand corner of f.17r. is torn off, and consequently the left hand side of f.17v. Back
  45. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  46. 'and that the' superscript in contemporary hand. Back
  47. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  48. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  49. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  50. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  51. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  52. NAS, PA2/16, f.17v-19r. Back
  53. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  54. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  55. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  56. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  57. Word unclear. Back
  58. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  59. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  60. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  61. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  62. This act is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/68. Back
  63. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Mss returns to usual hand. Back
  64. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  65. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  66. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  67. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  68. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  69. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v-20r. Back
  70. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  71. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r. Back
  72. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  73. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r-v. Back
  74. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  75. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  76. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  77. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  78. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  79. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  80. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  81. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  82. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  83. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  84. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  85. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  86. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  87. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  88. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  89. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  90. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  91. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  92. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  93. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r-v. Back
  94. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v. Back
  95. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  96. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v-22r. Back
  97. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  98. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r. Back
  99. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  100. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r-v. Back
  101. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  102. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v. Back
  103. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  104. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v-23r. Back
  105. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  106. Followed by a partly illegible deleted word, perhaps 'estate'? Back
  107. NAS, PA2/16, f.23r-v. Back
  108. 'P' printed in margin beside heading. Back
  109. NAS, PA2/16, f.23v-24r. Back
  110. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  111. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r. Back
  112. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  113. Uncertain meaning. Back
  114. Defined in DSL as 'The name of a water-fowl, wintering in Orkney and Shetland, and variously described as a variety of the teal, the pochard and the widgeon'. Back
  115. According to DSL, 'Origin and precise application obscure: the name of some (apparently aquatic) bird ... the guillemot or the razorbill, ? from the cries'. Back
  116. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r-v. Back
  117. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  118. NAS, PA2/16, f.24v-25r. Back
  119. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  120. NAS, PA2/16, f.25r-v. Back
  121. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  122. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  123. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  124. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  125. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  126. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, with or without sleeves, usually of leather lined or padded, and in the 16th century sometimes iron-plated or faced with mail. Back
  127. NAS, PA2/16, f.26r-27r. Back
  128. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  129. 'March' crossed out. Back
  130. NAS, PA2/16, f.27r-v. Back
  131. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  132. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v. Back
  133. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  134. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v-28r. Back
  135. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  136. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  137. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  138. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  139. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  140. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v. Back
  141. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  142. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v-29r. Back
  143. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  144. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  145. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  146. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  147. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  148. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  149. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  150. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r-v. Back
  151. 'V' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  152. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v. Back
  153. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  154. NAS, PA2/16, f.29v. Back
  155. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  156. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v-30r. Back
  157. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  158. NAS, PA2/16, f.30r-32r. Back
  159. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  160. The text of this act, not including the title heading, is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/22. Back
  161. NAS, PA2/16, f.32r-34v. Back
  162. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  163. 'portioner' scored out and replaced with 'feu farmer'. Back
  164. Inserted in superscript. Back
  165. Inserted in superscript. Back
  166. Followed by a deleted and illegible word. Back
  167. NAS, PA2/16, f.34v-35r. Back
  168. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  169. 'never' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  170. 'out' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  171. NAS, PA2/16, f.35v - blank folio page. Back
Legislation
Act regarding coinage

Our sovereign lord and estates of parliament, having at length reasoned regarding the state of the coinage, as the same is presently current within this realm, declare that in this present parliament they will in no way alter the fines nor prices of the coinage, either of gold or silver, but that the same has free passage and course hereafter as it presently gives. And because his majesty and estates understand that there is great scarcity of coinage for the present within this realm, therefore have given power and commission to the lords of his highness's secret council for taking order regarding the importation of bullion, for furnishing of the mint-house and discharging the transporting and exporting of gold, silver and other forbidden gear under the pain of punishment of their bodies and goods according to the discretion of the said commissioners, whereby the country may be furnished with abundance of coinage of such fines and prices as the same presently gives and has passage within this realm. And this act to be published to all our sovereign lord's lieges.

  1. NAS, PA2/16, f.2r. Back
  2. NAS, PA2/16, f.3r-7r. Back
  3. 'Ditty' written in margin, in contemporary hand. Back
  4. APS interpolation. Back
  5. 'Parthie' in mss. Back
  6. A contemporary comment in the margin refers to the 'ditty' against Alexander Ruthven. Back
  7. APS interpolation. Back
  8. 'Colin' written in superscript above 'Patrick', the latter name having been crossed out. All modifications written in contemporary hand. Back
  9. NAS, PA2/16, f.7r-11v. Back
  10. This must be the battering ram referred to in the second Latin summons at 1600/11/8 above. Back
  11. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, apparently so called because it was designed to be worn concealed under the outer clothes. Back
  12. Defined in DSL as a sleeve consisting of or reinforced by plate-armour. Back
  13. Word unclear. Back
  14. The following last 9 lines of NAS, PA2/16, f.8v are difficult to read due to smudging. Back
  15. Defined in DSL as a kind of close-fitting metal defensive headpiece, a metal skull-cap, commonly worn under a bonnet or other fabric covering. Common in the 16th century. Back
  16. At the bottom of NAS, PA2/16, f.9v there is a dark mark on the left of the folio that obscures the contents. Back
  17. Sections of text in NAS, PA2/16, f.10r-v are obscured by blotting. Back
  18. Sic. 'Hay' in 1600/11/8 above. Back
  19. Some this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  20. Some of this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  21. The last 12 lines of NAS PA2/16, f.11r (the following two and a half paragraphs) are obscured by a large blot. Back
  22. 'Alexander' scored out in APS. Back
  23. NAS, PA2/16, f.11v-12r.
    Text of act obscured by large blots.
    Back
  24. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r. Some of text obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  25. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  26. APS interpolation. Back
  27. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r-v. Much of this act is obscured by a blot in the folio. Back
  28. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  29. NAS, PA2/16, f.12v-13v. Back
  30. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  31. Word unclear. Back
  32. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  33. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  34. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  35. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  36. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v-15r. Back
  37. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  38. NAS, PA2/16, f.15r-v. Back
  39. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  40. NAS, PA2/16, f.16r-v. Back
  41. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  42. Possibly Spoutwells, Tayside. Back
  43. Blank spaces denote 2 deleted words, which are illegible. Back
  44. NAS, PA2/16, f.16v-17v. Bottom right hand corner of f.17r. is torn off, and consequently the left hand side of f.17v. Back
  45. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  46. 'and that the' superscript in contemporary hand. Back
  47. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  48. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  49. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  50. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  51. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  52. NAS, PA2/16, f.17v-19r. Back
  53. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  54. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  55. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  56. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  57. Word unclear. Back
  58. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  59. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  60. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  61. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  62. This act is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/68. Back
  63. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Mss returns to usual hand. Back
  64. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  65. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  66. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  67. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  68. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  69. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v-20r. Back
  70. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  71. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r. Back
  72. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  73. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r-v. Back
  74. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  75. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  76. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  77. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  78. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  79. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  80. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  81. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  82. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  83. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  84. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  85. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  86. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  87. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  88. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  89. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  90. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  91. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  92. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  93. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r-v. Back
  94. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v. Back
  95. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  96. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v-22r. Back
  97. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  98. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r. Back
  99. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  100. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r-v. Back
  101. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  102. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v. Back
  103. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  104. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v-23r. Back
  105. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  106. Followed by a partly illegible deleted word, perhaps 'estate'? Back
  107. NAS, PA2/16, f.23r-v. Back
  108. 'P' printed in margin beside heading. Back
  109. NAS, PA2/16, f.23v-24r. Back
  110. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  111. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r. Back
  112. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  113. Uncertain meaning. Back
  114. Defined in DSL as 'The name of a water-fowl, wintering in Orkney and Shetland, and variously described as a variety of the teal, the pochard and the widgeon'. Back
  115. According to DSL, 'Origin and precise application obscure: the name of some (apparently aquatic) bird ... the guillemot or the razorbill, ? from the cries'. Back
  116. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r-v. Back
  117. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  118. NAS, PA2/16, f.24v-25r. Back
  119. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  120. NAS, PA2/16, f.25r-v. Back
  121. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  122. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  123. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  124. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  125. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  126. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, with or without sleeves, usually of leather lined or padded, and in the 16th century sometimes iron-plated or faced with mail. Back
  127. NAS, PA2/16, f.26r-27r. Back
  128. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  129. 'March' crossed out. Back
  130. NAS, PA2/16, f.27r-v. Back
  131. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  132. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v. Back
  133. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  134. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v-28r. Back
  135. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  136. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  137. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  138. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  139. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  140. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v. Back
  141. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  142. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v-29r. Back
  143. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  144. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  145. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  146. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  147. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  148. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  149. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  150. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r-v. Back
  151. 'V' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  152. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v. Back
  153. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  154. NAS, PA2/16, f.29v. Back
  155. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  156. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v-30r. Back
  157. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  158. NAS, PA2/16, f.30r-32r. Back
  159. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  160. The text of this act, not including the title heading, is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/22. Back
  161. NAS, PA2/16, f.32r-34v. Back
  162. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  163. 'portioner' scored out and replaced with 'feu farmer'. Back
  164. Inserted in superscript. Back
  165. Inserted in superscript. Back
  166. Followed by a deleted and illegible word. Back
  167. NAS, PA2/16, f.34v-35r. Back
  168. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  169. 'never' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  170. 'out' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  171. NAS, PA2/16, f.35v - blank folio page. Back
Procedure: protest
Protestation for the burghs concerning bullion

The which day compeared personally Thomas Fisher, bailie of Edinburgh and one of the commissioners of this present parliament, and protested in name of the whole burghs that notwithstanding of the foresaid act of parliament that they be no further obliged in bringing home to this realm of bullion than is contained in the acts of parliament made of before.

  1. NAS, PA2/16, f.2r. Back
  2. NAS, PA2/16, f.3r-7r. Back
  3. 'Ditty' written in margin, in contemporary hand. Back
  4. APS interpolation. Back
  5. 'Parthie' in mss. Back
  6. A contemporary comment in the margin refers to the 'ditty' against Alexander Ruthven. Back
  7. APS interpolation. Back
  8. 'Colin' written in superscript above 'Patrick', the latter name having been crossed out. All modifications written in contemporary hand. Back
  9. NAS, PA2/16, f.7r-11v. Back
  10. This must be the battering ram referred to in the second Latin summons at 1600/11/8 above. Back
  11. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, apparently so called because it was designed to be worn concealed under the outer clothes. Back
  12. Defined in DSL as a sleeve consisting of or reinforced by plate-armour. Back
  13. Word unclear. Back
  14. The following last 9 lines of NAS, PA2/16, f.8v are difficult to read due to smudging. Back
  15. Defined in DSL as a kind of close-fitting metal defensive headpiece, a metal skull-cap, commonly worn under a bonnet or other fabric covering. Common in the 16th century. Back
  16. At the bottom of NAS, PA2/16, f.9v there is a dark mark on the left of the folio that obscures the contents. Back
  17. Sections of text in NAS, PA2/16, f.10r-v are obscured by blotting. Back
  18. Sic. 'Hay' in 1600/11/8 above. Back
  19. Some this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  20. Some of this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  21. The last 12 lines of NAS PA2/16, f.11r (the following two and a half paragraphs) are obscured by a large blot. Back
  22. 'Alexander' scored out in APS. Back
  23. NAS, PA2/16, f.11v-12r.
    Text of act obscured by large blots.
    Back
  24. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r. Some of text obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  25. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  26. APS interpolation. Back
  27. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r-v. Much of this act is obscured by a blot in the folio. Back
  28. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  29. NAS, PA2/16, f.12v-13v. Back
  30. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  31. Word unclear. Back
  32. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  33. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  34. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  35. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  36. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v-15r. Back
  37. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  38. NAS, PA2/16, f.15r-v. Back
  39. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  40. NAS, PA2/16, f.16r-v. Back
  41. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  42. Possibly Spoutwells, Tayside. Back
  43. Blank spaces denote 2 deleted words, which are illegible. Back
  44. NAS, PA2/16, f.16v-17v. Bottom right hand corner of f.17r. is torn off, and consequently the left hand side of f.17v. Back
  45. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  46. 'and that the' superscript in contemporary hand. Back
  47. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  48. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  49. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  50. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  51. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  52. NAS, PA2/16, f.17v-19r. Back
  53. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  54. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  55. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  56. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  57. Word unclear. Back
  58. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  59. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  60. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  61. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  62. This act is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/68. Back
  63. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Mss returns to usual hand. Back
  64. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  65. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  66. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  67. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  68. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  69. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v-20r. Back
  70. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  71. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r. Back
  72. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  73. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r-v. Back
  74. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  75. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  76. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  77. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  78. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  79. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  80. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  81. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  82. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  83. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  84. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  85. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  86. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  87. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  88. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  89. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  90. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  91. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  92. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  93. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r-v. Back
  94. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v. Back
  95. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  96. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v-22r. Back
  97. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  98. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r. Back
  99. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  100. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r-v. Back
  101. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  102. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v. Back
  103. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  104. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v-23r. Back
  105. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  106. Followed by a partly illegible deleted word, perhaps 'estate'? Back
  107. NAS, PA2/16, f.23r-v. Back
  108. 'P' printed in margin beside heading. Back
  109. NAS, PA2/16, f.23v-24r. Back
  110. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  111. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r. Back
  112. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  113. Uncertain meaning. Back
  114. Defined in DSL as 'The name of a water-fowl, wintering in Orkney and Shetland, and variously described as a variety of the teal, the pochard and the widgeon'. Back
  115. According to DSL, 'Origin and precise application obscure: the name of some (apparently aquatic) bird ... the guillemot or the razorbill, ? from the cries'. Back
  116. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r-v. Back
  117. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  118. NAS, PA2/16, f.24v-25r. Back
  119. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  120. NAS, PA2/16, f.25r-v. Back
  121. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  122. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  123. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  124. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  125. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  126. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, with or without sleeves, usually of leather lined or padded, and in the 16th century sometimes iron-plated or faced with mail. Back
  127. NAS, PA2/16, f.26r-27r. Back
  128. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  129. 'March' crossed out. Back
  130. NAS, PA2/16, f.27r-v. Back
  131. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  132. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v. Back
  133. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  134. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v-28r. Back
  135. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  136. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  137. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  138. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  139. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  140. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v. Back
  141. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  142. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v-29r. Back
  143. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  144. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  145. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  146. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  147. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  148. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  149. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  150. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r-v. Back
  151. 'V' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  152. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v. Back
  153. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  154. NAS, PA2/16, f.29v. Back
  155. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  156. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v-30r. Back
  157. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  158. NAS, PA2/16, f.30r-32r. Back
  159. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  160. The text of this act, not including the title heading, is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/22. Back
  161. NAS, PA2/16, f.32r-34v. Back
  162. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  163. 'portioner' scored out and replaced with 'feu farmer'. Back
  164. Inserted in superscript. Back
  165. Inserted in superscript. Back
  166. Followed by a deleted and illegible word. Back
  167. NAS, PA2/16, f.34v-35r. Back
  168. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  169. 'never' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  170. 'out' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  171. NAS, PA2/16, f.35v - blank folio page. Back
Legislation
Act regarding salting and transporting of herring

The king's majesty, with advice of the estates of this present parliament, statutes and ordains that no person nor persons, as well strangers as native born subjects of this realm, take upon hand to buy, pack, peel, salt, barrel or yet transport out of this realm any herring in small or great quantity at any time before Michaelmas [29 September] yearly, but to suffer the same to be brought to public markets and there sold to all his highness's lieges upon reasonable prices without attempting anything in contrary thereof, under the pain of confiscation of the same herring, barrels, ships and vessels and of all the rest of the moveable goods of the contraveners hereof in any point, the third part of the same to the apprehender and the rest to his majesty's use, to be intromitted with by his highness's comptroller and such as he shall give power and commission to that effect; and statutes and ordains that no licences be granted hereafter for packing, peeling, salting and transporting of herring before the time foresaid unless the same licences be granted with consent of the council sitting in council; and after the granting of the said licences ordains the same to pass the signet and whole seals, otherwise declares the same licences to be null and of no value.

  1. NAS, PA2/16, f.2r. Back
  2. NAS, PA2/16, f.3r-7r. Back
  3. 'Ditty' written in margin, in contemporary hand. Back
  4. APS interpolation. Back
  5. 'Parthie' in mss. Back
  6. A contemporary comment in the margin refers to the 'ditty' against Alexander Ruthven. Back
  7. APS interpolation. Back
  8. 'Colin' written in superscript above 'Patrick', the latter name having been crossed out. All modifications written in contemporary hand. Back
  9. NAS, PA2/16, f.7r-11v. Back
  10. This must be the battering ram referred to in the second Latin summons at 1600/11/8 above. Back
  11. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, apparently so called because it was designed to be worn concealed under the outer clothes. Back
  12. Defined in DSL as a sleeve consisting of or reinforced by plate-armour. Back
  13. Word unclear. Back
  14. The following last 9 lines of NAS, PA2/16, f.8v are difficult to read due to smudging. Back
  15. Defined in DSL as a kind of close-fitting metal defensive headpiece, a metal skull-cap, commonly worn under a bonnet or other fabric covering. Common in the 16th century. Back
  16. At the bottom of NAS, PA2/16, f.9v there is a dark mark on the left of the folio that obscures the contents. Back
  17. Sections of text in NAS, PA2/16, f.10r-v are obscured by blotting. Back
  18. Sic. 'Hay' in 1600/11/8 above. Back
  19. Some this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  20. Some of this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  21. The last 12 lines of NAS PA2/16, f.11r (the following two and a half paragraphs) are obscured by a large blot. Back
  22. 'Alexander' scored out in APS. Back
  23. NAS, PA2/16, f.11v-12r.
    Text of act obscured by large blots.
    Back
  24. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r. Some of text obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  25. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  26. APS interpolation. Back
  27. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r-v. Much of this act is obscured by a blot in the folio. Back
  28. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  29. NAS, PA2/16, f.12v-13v. Back
  30. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  31. Word unclear. Back
  32. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  33. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  34. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  35. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  36. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v-15r. Back
  37. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  38. NAS, PA2/16, f.15r-v. Back
  39. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  40. NAS, PA2/16, f.16r-v. Back
  41. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  42. Possibly Spoutwells, Tayside. Back
  43. Blank spaces denote 2 deleted words, which are illegible. Back
  44. NAS, PA2/16, f.16v-17v. Bottom right hand corner of f.17r. is torn off, and consequently the left hand side of f.17v. Back
  45. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  46. 'and that the' superscript in contemporary hand. Back
  47. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  48. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  49. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  50. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  51. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  52. NAS, PA2/16, f.17v-19r. Back
  53. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  54. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  55. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  56. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  57. Word unclear. Back
  58. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  59. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  60. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  61. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  62. This act is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/68. Back
  63. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Mss returns to usual hand. Back
  64. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  65. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  66. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  67. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  68. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  69. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v-20r. Back
  70. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  71. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r. Back
  72. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  73. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r-v. Back
  74. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  75. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  76. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  77. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  78. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  79. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  80. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  81. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  82. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  83. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  84. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  85. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  86. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  87. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  88. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  89. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  90. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  91. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  92. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  93. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r-v. Back
  94. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v. Back
  95. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  96. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v-22r. Back
  97. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  98. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r. Back
  99. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  100. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r-v. Back
  101. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  102. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v. Back
  103. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  104. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v-23r. Back
  105. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  106. Followed by a partly illegible deleted word, perhaps 'estate'? Back
  107. NAS, PA2/16, f.23r-v. Back
  108. 'P' printed in margin beside heading. Back
  109. NAS, PA2/16, f.23v-24r. Back
  110. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  111. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r. Back
  112. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  113. Uncertain meaning. Back
  114. Defined in DSL as 'The name of a water-fowl, wintering in Orkney and Shetland, and variously described as a variety of the teal, the pochard and the widgeon'. Back
  115. According to DSL, 'Origin and precise application obscure: the name of some (apparently aquatic) bird ... the guillemot or the razorbill, ? from the cries'. Back
  116. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r-v. Back
  117. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  118. NAS, PA2/16, f.24v-25r. Back
  119. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  120. NAS, PA2/16, f.25r-v. Back
  121. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  122. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  123. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  124. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  125. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  126. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, with or without sleeves, usually of leather lined or padded, and in the 16th century sometimes iron-plated or faced with mail. Back
  127. NAS, PA2/16, f.26r-27r. Back
  128. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  129. 'March' crossed out. Back
  130. NAS, PA2/16, f.27r-v. Back
  131. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  132. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v. Back
  133. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  134. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v-28r. Back
  135. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  136. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  137. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  138. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  139. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  140. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v. Back
  141. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  142. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v-29r. Back
  143. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  144. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  145. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  146. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  147. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  148. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  149. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  150. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r-v. Back
  151. 'V' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  152. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v. Back
  153. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  154. NAS, PA2/16, f.29v. Back
  155. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  156. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v-30r. Back
  157. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  158. NAS, PA2/16, f.30r-32r. Back
  159. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  160. The text of this act, not including the title heading, is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/22. Back
  161. NAS, PA2/16, f.32r-34v. Back
  162. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  163. 'portioner' scored out and replaced with 'feu farmer'. Back
  164. Inserted in superscript. Back
  165. Inserted in superscript. Back
  166. Followed by a deleted and illegible word. Back
  167. NAS, PA2/16, f.34v-35r. Back
  168. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  169. 'never' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  170. 'out' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  171. NAS, PA2/16, f.35v - blank folio page. Back
Slaying of salmon in forbidden time to be a crime of theft in time coming

Our sovereign lord and estates of parliament statute and ordain that the slaying of salmon in forbidden time, or of kipper smolts or such black fish at any time, shall be in all time coming a crime of theft to the committer whatsoever and shall be punished as theft in every quality according to the committer's rank and estate, excepting always out of this present act the salmon, kipper smolts and all other fish slain or taken within the rivers of Annan and Tweed only.

  1. NAS, PA2/16, f.2r. Back
  2. NAS, PA2/16, f.3r-7r. Back
  3. 'Ditty' written in margin, in contemporary hand. Back
  4. APS interpolation. Back
  5. 'Parthie' in mss. Back
  6. A contemporary comment in the margin refers to the 'ditty' against Alexander Ruthven. Back
  7. APS interpolation. Back
  8. 'Colin' written in superscript above 'Patrick', the latter name having been crossed out. All modifications written in contemporary hand. Back
  9. NAS, PA2/16, f.7r-11v. Back
  10. This must be the battering ram referred to in the second Latin summons at 1600/11/8 above. Back
  11. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, apparently so called because it was designed to be worn concealed under the outer clothes. Back
  12. Defined in DSL as a sleeve consisting of or reinforced by plate-armour. Back
  13. Word unclear. Back
  14. The following last 9 lines of NAS, PA2/16, f.8v are difficult to read due to smudging. Back
  15. Defined in DSL as a kind of close-fitting metal defensive headpiece, a metal skull-cap, commonly worn under a bonnet or other fabric covering. Common in the 16th century. Back
  16. At the bottom of NAS, PA2/16, f.9v there is a dark mark on the left of the folio that obscures the contents. Back
  17. Sections of text in NAS, PA2/16, f.10r-v are obscured by blotting. Back
  18. Sic. 'Hay' in 1600/11/8 above. Back
  19. Some this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  20. Some of this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  21. The last 12 lines of NAS PA2/16, f.11r (the following two and a half paragraphs) are obscured by a large blot. Back
  22. 'Alexander' scored out in APS. Back
  23. NAS, PA2/16, f.11v-12r.
    Text of act obscured by large blots.
    Back
  24. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r. Some of text obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  25. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  26. APS interpolation. Back
  27. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r-v. Much of this act is obscured by a blot in the folio. Back
  28. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  29. NAS, PA2/16, f.12v-13v. Back
  30. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  31. Word unclear. Back
  32. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  33. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  34. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  35. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  36. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v-15r. Back
  37. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  38. NAS, PA2/16, f.15r-v. Back
  39. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  40. NAS, PA2/16, f.16r-v. Back
  41. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  42. Possibly Spoutwells, Tayside. Back
  43. Blank spaces denote 2 deleted words, which are illegible. Back
  44. NAS, PA2/16, f.16v-17v. Bottom right hand corner of f.17r. is torn off, and consequently the left hand side of f.17v. Back
  45. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  46. 'and that the' superscript in contemporary hand. Back
  47. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  48. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  49. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  50. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  51. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  52. NAS, PA2/16, f.17v-19r. Back
  53. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  54. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  55. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  56. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  57. Word unclear. Back
  58. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  59. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  60. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  61. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  62. This act is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/68. Back
  63. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Mss returns to usual hand. Back
  64. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  65. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  66. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  67. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  68. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  69. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v-20r. Back
  70. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  71. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r. Back
  72. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  73. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r-v. Back
  74. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  75. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  76. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  77. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  78. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  79. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  80. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  81. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  82. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  83. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  84. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  85. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  86. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  87. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  88. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  89. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  90. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  91. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  92. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  93. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r-v. Back
  94. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v. Back
  95. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  96. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v-22r. Back
  97. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  98. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r. Back
  99. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  100. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r-v. Back
  101. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  102. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v. Back
  103. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  104. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v-23r. Back
  105. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  106. Followed by a partly illegible deleted word, perhaps 'estate'? Back
  107. NAS, PA2/16, f.23r-v. Back
  108. 'P' printed in margin beside heading. Back
  109. NAS, PA2/16, f.23v-24r. Back
  110. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  111. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r. Back
  112. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  113. Uncertain meaning. Back
  114. Defined in DSL as 'The name of a water-fowl, wintering in Orkney and Shetland, and variously described as a variety of the teal, the pochard and the widgeon'. Back
  115. According to DSL, 'Origin and precise application obscure: the name of some (apparently aquatic) bird ... the guillemot or the razorbill, ? from the cries'. Back
  116. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r-v. Back
  117. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  118. NAS, PA2/16, f.24v-25r. Back
  119. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  120. NAS, PA2/16, f.25r-v. Back
  121. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  122. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  123. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  124. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  125. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  126. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, with or without sleeves, usually of leather lined or padded, and in the 16th century sometimes iron-plated or faced with mail. Back
  127. NAS, PA2/16, f.26r-27r. Back
  128. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  129. 'March' crossed out. Back
  130. NAS, PA2/16, f.27r-v. Back
  131. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  132. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v. Back
  133. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  134. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v-28r. Back
  135. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  136. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  137. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  138. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  139. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  140. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v. Back
  141. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  142. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v-29r. Back
  143. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  144. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  145. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  146. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  147. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  148. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  149. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  150. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r-v. Back
  151. 'V' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  152. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v. Back
  153. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  154. NAS, PA2/16, f.29v. Back
  155. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  156. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v-30r. Back
  157. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  158. NAS, PA2/16, f.30r-32r. Back
  159. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  160. The text of this act, not including the title heading, is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/22. Back
  161. NAS, PA2/16, f.32r-34v. Back
  162. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  163. 'portioner' scored out and replaced with 'feu farmer'. Back
  164. Inserted in superscript. Back
  165. Inserted in superscript. Back
  166. Followed by a deleted and illegible word. Back
  167. NAS, PA2/16, f.34v-35r. Back
  168. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  169. 'never' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  170. 'out' is obscured by a small hole in the manuscript. Back
  171. NAS, PA2/16, f.35v - blank folio page. Back
Regarding singular combats

Our sovereign lord and estates of this present parliament, considering the great liberty that sundry persons take in provoking others to singular combats upon sudden and frivolous quarrels, which has engendered great inconveniences within this realm, therefore statute and ordain that no person in time coming without his highness's licence fight any singular combat under the pain of death and his moveable gear escheat to his highness's use, and the provoker to be punished with a more ignominious death than the defender at the pleasure of his majesty.

  1. NAS, PA2/16, f.2r. Back
  2. NAS, PA2/16, f.3r-7r. Back
  3. 'Ditty' written in margin, in contemporary hand. Back
  4. APS interpolation. Back
  5. 'Parthie' in mss. Back
  6. A contemporary comment in the margin refers to the 'ditty' against Alexander Ruthven. Back
  7. APS interpolation. Back
  8. 'Colin' written in superscript above 'Patrick', the latter name having been crossed out. All modifications written in contemporary hand. Back
  9. NAS, PA2/16, f.7r-11v. Back
  10. This must be the battering ram referred to in the second Latin summons at 1600/11/8 above. Back
  11. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, apparently so called because it was designed to be worn concealed under the outer clothes. Back
  12. Defined in DSL as a sleeve consisting of or reinforced by plate-armour. Back
  13. Word unclear. Back
  14. The following last 9 lines of NAS, PA2/16, f.8v are difficult to read due to smudging. Back
  15. Defined in DSL as a kind of close-fitting metal defensive headpiece, a metal skull-cap, commonly worn under a bonnet or other fabric covering. Common in the 16th century. Back
  16. At the bottom of NAS, PA2/16, f.9v there is a dark mark on the left of the folio that obscures the contents. Back
  17. Sections of text in NAS, PA2/16, f.10r-v are obscured by blotting. Back
  18. Sic. 'Hay' in 1600/11/8 above. Back
  19. Some this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  20. Some of this paragraph is obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  21. The last 12 lines of NAS PA2/16, f.11r (the following two and a half paragraphs) are obscured by a large blot. Back
  22. 'Alexander' scored out in APS. Back
  23. NAS, PA2/16, f.11v-12r.
    Text of act obscured by large blots.
    Back
  24. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r. Some of text obscured by a blot on the folio. Back
  25. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  26. APS interpolation. Back
  27. NAS, PA2/16, f.12r-v. Much of this act is obscured by a blot in the folio. Back
  28. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  29. NAS, PA2/16, f.12v-13v. Back
  30. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  31. Word unclear. Back
  32. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  33. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  34. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v. Back
  35. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  36. NAS, PA2/16, f.13v-15r. Back
  37. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  38. NAS, PA2/16, f.15r-v. Back
  39. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  40. NAS, PA2/16, f.16r-v. Back
  41. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  42. Possibly Spoutwells, Tayside. Back
  43. Blank spaces denote 2 deleted words, which are illegible. Back
  44. NAS, PA2/16, f.16v-17v. Bottom right hand corner of f.17r. is torn off, and consequently the left hand side of f.17v. Back
  45. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  46. 'and that the' superscript in contemporary hand. Back
  47. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  48. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  49. Rest of line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  50. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  51. Rest of word and line missing due to tear in folio. Back
  52. NAS, PA2/16, f.17v-19r. Back
  53. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  54. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  55. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  56. Rest of line is missing due to tear in folio. Back
  57. Word unclear. Back
  58. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  59. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  60. NAS, PA2/16, f.19r. Back
  61. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  62. This act is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/68. Back
  63. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Mss returns to usual hand. Back
  64. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  65. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  66. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  67. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v. Back
  68. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  69. NAS, PA2/16, f.19v-20r. Back
  70. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  71. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r. Back
  72. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  73. NAS, PA2/16, f.20r-v. Back
  74. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  75. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  76. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  77. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  78. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  79. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  80. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  81. NAS, PA2/16, f.20v. Back
  82. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  83. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  84. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  85. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  86. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  87. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  88. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  89. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  90. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  91. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r. Back
  92. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  93. NAS, PA2/16, f.21r-v. Back
  94. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v. Back
  95. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  96. NAS, PA2/16, f.21v-22r. Back
  97. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  98. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r. Back
  99. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  100. NAS, PA2/16, f.22r-v. Back
  101. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  102. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v. Back
  103. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  104. NAS, PA2/16, f.22v-23r. Back
  105. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  106. Followed by a partly illegible deleted word, perhaps 'estate'? Back
  107. NAS, PA2/16, f.23r-v. Back
  108. 'P' printed in margin beside heading. Back
  109. NAS, PA2/16, f.23v-24r. Back
  110. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  111. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r. Back
  112. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  113. Uncertain meaning. Back
  114. Defined in DSL as 'The name of a water-fowl, wintering in Orkney and Shetland, and variously described as a variety of the teal, the pochard and the widgeon'. Back
  115. According to DSL, 'Origin and precise application obscure: the name of some (apparently aquatic) bird ... the guillemot or the razorbill, ? from the cries'. Back
  116. NAS, PA2/16, f.24r-v. Back
  117. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  118. NAS, PA2/16, f.24v-25r. Back
  119. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  120. NAS, PA2/16, f.25r-v. Back
  121. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  122. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  123. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  124. NAS, PA2/16, f.25v. Back
  125. 'V' written in margin beside heading. Back
  126. Defined in DSL as a jerkin or doublet of defence, with or without sleeves, usually of leather lined or padded, and in the 16th century sometimes iron-plated or faced with mail. Back
  127. NAS, PA2/16, f.26r-27r. Back
  128. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  129. 'March' crossed out. Back
  130. NAS, PA2/16, f.27r-v. Back
  131. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  132. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v. Back
  133. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  134. NAS, PA2/16, f.27v-28r. Back
  135. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  136. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  137. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  138. NAS, PA2/16, f.28r. Back
  139. 'P' written in margin beside heading. Back
  140. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v. Back
  141. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  142. NAS, PA2/16, f.28v-29r. Back
  143. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  144. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  145. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  146. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  147. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  148. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r. Back
  149. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  150. NAS, PA2/16, f.29r-v. Back
  151. 'V' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  152. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v. Back
  153. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  154. NAS, PA2/16, f.29v. Back
  155. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  156. NAS, PA2/16, f. 29v-30r. Back
  157. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  158. NAS, PA2/16, f.30r-32r. Back
  159. 'P' is written in margin beside heading. Back
  160. The text of this act, not including the title heading, is written in a different hand, which is similar to that of 1600/11/22.